Live flooding coverage - Day 1

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Latest

  • Bridge inspection work in Tadcaster
  • Barge sinks in York
  • Fire service receive 260+ call-outs over the past 24 hours
  • A1 closed
  • Warnings for motorists
  • Widespread rail delays
  • ... and 2 donkeys rescued

1:45pm

9:18am

Flooding updates for Wednesday will continue in our second day coverage>>

9:04am

The River Ouse in York is set to peak at 4.5m above normal river levels this afternoon.

9:03am

In York the Environment Agency is warning that isolated properties on Huntington Road, Haley's Terrace, Yearsley Cres, The Groves, Foss Bank and properties surrounding Wormalds Cut and Foss Navigation could be at risk of flooding.
 

8:56am

IN North Yorkshire the bridge in Tadcaster over the River Wharfe was closed to traffic last night as engineers made checks and the bridge over the River Ure in the centre of Boroughbridge was also shut. The Tadcaster bridge has also been closed to pedestrians.

8:54am

ABOUT 2,000 properties in York are on flood alert this morning.

The Environment Agency said stretches of the River Ouse at York and Selby are particularly vulnerable as the huge amount of rain that has fallen over the Yorkshire Dales in the last two days works its way through the system.

7:57am

7:50am

Tadcaster: Bridge Street closed as inspection work being carried out on the bridge.

7:44am

10:09pm

The Environment Agency says its flood risk level for North Yorkshire and York tonight is "medium", meaning flooding is expected, but should drop to "low" on Wednesday as the rain is forecast to move away.

The "low" level means flooding is possible and the public should stay alert and keep checking the weather forecast and flood warnings, as well as taking precautions while travelling and planning journeys to take possible delays into account.

However, the agency says there is also a "residual flood risk" throughout Wednesday along the River Ouse, as it takes longer to respond to rainfall with water flowing into the river from higher ground. It will be updating the UK's flood status on Wednesday morning.

See The Press on Wednesday for a full report and pictures from today's flooding incidents, and keep checking thepress.co.uk throughout the day, as well as following @yorkpress on twitter, for the latest information on floods in York and North and East Yorkshire.

7:50pm

There are currently four flood warnings in place on the River Ouse, covering the area around St George's Field, riverside properties on Kings Staith, Queens Staith, South Esplanade and New Walk, and at Linton Lock and Naburn Lock.

A warning was also put in place at 5pm today for the River Derwent at Buttercrambe Mill, while an Ouse flood alert is covering riverside footpaths and low-lying land in York and another is covering farmland next to the river in the Selby, Cawood, Kelfield and Wistow areas.

The Environment Agency has issued warnings for the River Ure at Milby Island and at Roecliffe Caravan Park, and the River Nidd at Hunsingore and Cattal.

7:35pm

Fire crews in North Yorkshire say they had received more than 270 calls in the 24 hours leading up to 2.30pm today as heavy rain swept across the region and caused severe flooding problems.

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service called in help from neighbouring services, including Cleveland, Lancashire and Cumbria, and has said that, for several hours, it was dealing with more than 50 incidents and had 73 more waiting for crews to be assigned to them.

Firefighters have been forced to work some way from their usual patch as many of the incidents were in the northern part of the region, with crews from Selby attending incidents in Richmond. One Reeth crew which was called out at 7.30pm on Monday did not come off duty until 1.30pm today due to their workload.

Command centres were set up in Richmond, Leyburn, Colburn and Northallerton, and the fire service said its call-outs included "dozens" of cars stranded in flood water, more than 20 people being rescued from vehicles which had become stuck - including two men in a bin lorry - and sheep and horses being led to safety from rising water.

Extra control room operators were drafted in to handle the level of calls and the service said it had also had to make arrangements for fuel to be delivered directly to the scene of incidents so fire engines and pumps could be topped up, or for appliances to be relieved so they could refuel.

6:14pm

Police are urging motorists not to drive unnecessarily tonight, as a number of roads remain closed.

The A1 is closed between junction 49 at the A168 and Catterick and traffic is being diverted to the A19. There are also delays on the A1 at Marne Barracks. It is not known when the A1 will reopen.

Other roads/areas affected include:

  • The road into Richmond is flooded.
  • Tunstall Bridge is flooded.
  • The B6271 between Brompton-on-Swale and Richmond is flooded.
  • The A689 at Crakehall is flooded.
  • The A684 at Morton on Swale is flooded.
  • The A61 at Skipton on Swale is passable with care.
  • Gilling West village is flooded.
  • Bellerby is flooded.
  • The A684 at Aysgarth is flooded.
  • The bridge over the River Swale at Scotton is closed.
  • The A66 is flooded at the Fox Inn.
  • The road into Newton-le-Willows is closed.
  • The road from Leyburn to Catterick Garrison is closed.
  • The iron Bridge at Great Langton is flooded.
  • Catterick Village is flooded.
  • Croft on Tees is flooded.

6:14pm

East Coast Trains are now running a "limited" service between London and Edinburgh following earlier flooding south of Darlington.

An hourly service is operating on the section of the East Coast Main Line between York and Darlington, but East Coast is advising people not to travel for the rest of the day. Tickets for travel today will still be valid tomorrow, and ticket restrictions have been lifted for the rest of today to allow people to use different services.

"We thank passengers for their understanding during the extreme weather conditions which have severely disrupted road and rail travel through much of northern England today," said East Coast spokesman John Gelson.

"Our advice to those travelling first thing on Wednesday morning is to check before setting out. We are hoping to run through trains on the route tomorrow, as the worst of the weather is forecast to improve."

Travel information is available at eastcoast.co.uk, by following the East Coast twitter feed @eastcoastuk or by phoning National Rail Enquiries on 08457 484950.

4:42pm

A resident of Knaresborough wades through water following flooding from the River Nidd in the town.

York Press: A resident of Knaresborough wades through water following flooding from the River Nidd in the town.

4:20pm

The A64 at Scampston in Ryedale is only just passable and traffic is very slow, we're told.

4:15pm

The search for a body in the River Swale has been completed and called off. Police say they have found a yellow flotation ring at Kiplin and believe that was what had been seen in the water.

Initial reports this morning suggested a man in yellow jacket had been seen near Marne Barracks.

A North Yorkshire Police spokesman said: "At around 3.05pm this afternoon, a yellow floatation ring was found at Kiplin. It is likely that this is the object that was seen in the river this morning and as a result search teams have been stood down."

4:15pm

Searches of the River Swale for a person believed to have been washed away have been stood down.

Reports this morning suggested that a man in yellow jacket had been seen near Marne Barracks.

At about 3.05pm this afternoon a yellow floatation ring was found at Kiplin - police believe it is likely that this is the object that was seen in the river this morning and as a result search teams have been stood down.

4:13pm

Nineteen pensioners – the oldest of which is 92 - at a flooded North Yorkshire care home were carried to safety by firefighters when its flood defences broke.
The Oswin Grove care home at Gilling West, in Richmondshire, was three foot under water this morning and was evacuated.

4:05pm

82 flood warnings across the UK now, say the Environment Agency.

3:50pm

Emergency services are scaling back a search for a person believed to have been washed away in the River Swale in North Yorkshire.

Police received a report at 11.25 am this morning of a man in a yellow jacket in the river at Marne barracks, near Catterick Village.

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service, the police and Swaledale Mountain Rescue Team launched a major search - but now are scaling back thier operation.

A spokesman for North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service said there had been no further sightings.

3:21pm

This from York Travel on twitter....

3:04pm

Severe flood warnings at riverside properties in York including Kings Staith, Queens Staith, South Esplanade and New Walk have been issued

3:02pm

Environment Agency says river levels will be higher in York tomorrow -  http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/floods/34681.aspx?area=122FWF710&page=1&type=Region&term=Northeast

City of York Council say they are working closely with the agency and say its standard sandbag policy is in place

2:56pm

Environment Agency says the current level at the Viking Recorder in York is 3.17m above ordinary depth. Levels are expected to rise throughout today and into tomorrow. Further rain is forecast.

2:34pm

Firefighters, a search helicopter and a mountain rescue team are still currently searching the area around Marne Barracks at Catterick Garrison after reports of a man in a yellow jacket being swept away by the floods.

Crews are searching upstream and downstream.

More to follow as it comes.

2:28pm

Update on sinking boat at Marygate, York: North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue say a boat crew have now rescued the owners of the stranded vessel.

2:26pm

Motorists are being reminded only to travel when necessary

2:12pm

UP to 20-30mm of rain is expected across the North West region in the next 24 hours

2:09pm

Torrential rain has caused traffic chaos, including the A1 at Catterick which is under water.

1:32pm

TheEnvironment Agency has 73 flood warnings for rivers in place, and more than 150 less serious flood alerts.

1:23pm

North Yorks Fire and Rescue have attended more than 260 incidents over the last 24 hours

 

1:18pm

RSPCA this morning called in staff from Liverpool, Manchester, Darlington and Preston to help two donkeys - called Noah and David - caught in flood water in North Yorkshire at Cattal. Noah and David have both been safely rescued.

1:03pm

Firefighters say they are on their way to reports of a person in a refuse truck in Northallerton, stuck in flood-water which has reached the steering wheel.

12:56pm

Getting reports of another boat close to sinking on the River Ouse in York at Marygate near the Bay Horse pub.

Firefighters have been called.

More to follow as it comes.

12:53pm

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue are currently dealing with 50 ongoing incidents

12:53pm

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue are currently dealing with 50 ongoing incidents

12:51pm

North Yorks County Council say some drivers are ignoring road-blocks and driving through flooded roads, causing bow waves which are then flooding road-side properties. They say this is "causing anger and distress among residents" and urge people to obey the closures.

12:49pm

FIREFIGHTERS are currently searching for a person reportedly trapped in a swollen river in North Yorkshire.

Fire crews along with Cleveland Air Support are at Catterick.

Crews are searching upstream and downstream and mountain rescue have set up their swift water team.

More to follow.

12:42pm

This picture of the A1 at Catterick comes via Malcolm Warne at one of our sister papers in the North East:

12:17pm

Flooding is causing severe train delays.

There is currently no service on the East Coast Main Line between Darlington and York: the line is blocked due to flooding at Eryholme, near Northallerton.

This is affecting services operated by East Coast, Cross Country and First TransPennine Express.

Due to flooding on many roads to the south of Darlington it's currently not possible to run replacement bus services either.

East Coast passengers being advised not to travel today: tickets for today will be valid for travel tomorrow.

East Coast trains spokesman John Gelson said: "We apologise to customers for the disruption to their journeys today.

"Very heavy rain across a wide area of northern England is affecting all travel today, and conditions are not expected to improve until this evening.

"Our advice to customers is to delay their journeys until the situation improves. East Coast tickets for today will be
valid for travel tomorrow."

York Press: Flooded railway line near Dalton, North Yorkshire

The flooded railway line at Dalton in North Yorkshire

12:01pm

There are a number of cancellations now from York Station: the 1229 to King's Cross; the 1232 to Glasgow Central; the 1234 to Newcastle and the 1234 to Southampton Central via Doncaster.

12:00pm

East Coast are still reporting delays due to the weather. Their tickets are also being accepted on Virgin, Northern Rail and Transpennine Express trains, as staff work to reduce disruption.

11:44am

St George's Field car park in York is beginning to flood. City of York Council ask any motorists parked there to return to their cars.

11:37am

Fire crews were called to help an ambulance with a patient on board caught in flood waters in North Yorkshire.
Firefighters were called to help tow the ambulance which had slipped off the road at Little Langton, Northallerton
The crew have stabilised the vehicle and because of the road conditions have used the fire engine to transfer the casualty to a point of safety.
The casualty is due to be transferred to hospital by either a road ambulance or the air ambulance.

11:01am

The British Army have said the Royal Dragoon Guards deployment event due to be held at 4.15pm today at Alma Lines, Munster Barracks, Catterick Garrison, has been cancelled due to the weather conditions.

11:00am

A group shelter from the heavy rain under umbrellas as they walk across Lendal Bridge in York, while a passer-by takes a photograph of the swollen River Ouse

York Press: People with umbrellas in heavy rain in York

10:52am

  • The A684 closed in both directions at Aysgarth
  • Standing water near Thirsk and Northallerton Golf Club and between Sutton under Whitestonecliffe and Thirsk.
  • Flooding in Gilling West.
  • Road into Newton le Willows is impassable.
  • Bridge at Crakehall impassable due to flooding.
  • Flooding in Tunstall and road blocked into the village.
  • Flooding in Morton on Swale and Great Langton.
  • B6267 impassable at Ingleby Quernhow.
  • Numerous other roads are flooded across Richmondshire, most are passable with care.
  • In Craven, the road in Carelton in closed. There is flooding at Bolton Abbey, Gargrave and Settle. However, the roads are passable with care.
  • In York the River Ouse is 2.8 meters higher than normal levels.

10:50am

A1 at Catterick -  both carriageways are closed again between the A168 and Leeming Bar.

10:50am

More pictures of the sinking barge in the River Ouse

York Press: Sinking barge on River Ouse

York Press: Sinking barge on River Ouse

10:49am

North Yorkshire Police say Hambleton and Richmondshire are the areas worst affected by the heavy rainfall.

 

10:48am

Flood warnings are currently in place at:

• Brompton-on-Swale Caravan Park
• Gilling Beck at Gilling West
• Brough Beck at Catterick
• River Ure at Roecliffe Caravan Park
• Bishop Monkton Beck
• River Nidd at Hunsingore and Cattal
• River Nidd at Knaresborough Caravan Parks

10:37am

Ongoing incidents this morning: Crews attended flooding to the cellar of a pub in West Witton. Firefighters pumped the water out and managed to divert the floodwater away.
Several vehicles have been stuck in floodwater at the A684 at Morton on Swale. Firefighters have helped tow trapped vehicles out of the water.
North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue said they have been getting a lot of calls to flooded properties around the areas of Colburn and Leyburn.

10:24am

If you're planning to travel by rail today, you can get live updates on departures from York Station here: http://ojp.nationalrail.co.uk/service/ldbboard/dep/YRK

10:12am

There are delays on the trains today too. The 1029 from York to Kings Cross is currently running 49 minutes late, and the 1032 to Glasgow has been cancelled.

10:08am

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue say that, as at 9.30am today, they were dealing with 20 incidents and 39 other potential incidents that they may be attending.  A spokesman said incidents were mainly in the north of the county, around Leyburn, Snape, Catterick and other areas around Richmondshire and Hambleton.

Firefighters from Humberside, Cleveland and Cumbria are helping out or on stand-by.

10:03am

North Yorkshire County Council has published this list of roads closed due to flooding: http://www.northyorks.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=21311

9:44am

Another reader picture from the banks of the Ouse:

9:41am

Scroll down to the foot of this story for pictures of the barge sinking, taken from York Rowing Club.

9:41am

Another picture of the barge:

9:32am

Latest on capsized barge: A spokesman for North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue said fire crews were called to reports of a long boat in danger of capsizing.

He said when firefighters arrived they found the boat badly listing to the port side.

Crews cut the mooring lines on the boat to try to right the vessel but due to the amount of water taken on board firefighters were unable to save it and had to let the boat sink.

9:27am

A warning on twitter from the Environment Agency....

9:14am

Rail services north of York are disrupted today due to the weather. There are reports of flooding to some tracks near Darlington, and delays have been compounded by a signalling problem between Newcastle and Edinburgh.

9:13am

Do you have details or pictures of any flooding incidents? email jennifer.bell@thepress.co.uk or tweet us at @yorkpress

9:13am

A large number of flood warnings remain in force across the whole of North Yorkshire and motorists are urged to take extra care while out on the roads.

9:12am

FIREFIGHTERS were called to more than 80 flooding incidents overnight across the county.

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service said the majority of the calls were between 4pm and 10pm yesterday and were mainly in the west and north of the county.

Many were within the Harrogate and Summerbridge area where a number of domestic and commercial properties were flooded.

A school at Summerbridge was affected by floodwater and fire crews set up sandbags to try to divert the water.

Some properties in the Richmond and Colburn areas and northern parts of the Yorkshire Dales were flooded, and some vehicles were stranded in flood water.

Crews also removed several cars from standing floodwater on the A1 at Brompton on Swale.

Five people had to be rescued from vehicles in the Skeeby area and one person from a stranded vehicle at Whashton.

9:09am

A barge has capsized and sunk in York city centre. Firefighters were called to the Ouse near Lendal Bridge at about 8am today, but said they were unable to stop the boat sinking.

York Press: Barge sinking on River Ouse

York Press: Barge sinking on River Ouse

York Press: Barge sinking on River Ouse

York Press: Barge sinking on River Ouse

York Press: Barge sinking on River Ouse

York Press: Barge sinking on River Ouse

Comments (41)

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9:14am Tue 25 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Never mind the rain - I was nearly driven off the A64 by laughter, thanks to an Environment Agency spokesman on Radio Five who appeared to be having trouble with basic geography.

Presenter: 'And where are the real problem areas, that are at serious risk of flooding?'

EA moron: 'The north, and especially in the North West'.

Presenter: 'Are there any specific towns in the North West that we should be worried about?'

EA moron: 'Yes. We're especially worried about the risk of widespread property damage in Morpeth.
Never mind the rain - I was nearly driven off the A64 by laughter, thanks to an Environment Agency spokesman on Radio Five who appeared to be having trouble with basic geography. Presenter: 'And where are the real problem areas, that are at serious risk of flooding?' EA moron: 'The north, and especially in the North West'. Presenter: 'Are there any specific towns in the North West that we should be worried about?' EA moron: 'Yes. We're especially worried about the risk of widespread property damage in Morpeth. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

9:31am Tue 25 Sep 12

Peterwalker says...

Tee Hee
Tee Hee Peterwalker
  • Score: 0

9:50am Tue 25 Sep 12

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink.
9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink. Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 0

9:58am Tue 25 Sep 12

Jazzper says...

Looks more like a narrow boat to me, I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water.
Looks more like a narrow boat to me, I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water. Jazzper
  • Score: 0

10:25am Tue 25 Sep 12

Woody G Mellor says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink.
Obviously Viking long boats were more intelligent than today's long boats.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: 9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink.[/p][/quote]Obviously Viking long boats were more intelligent than today's long boats. Woody G Mellor
  • Score: 0

10:36am Tue 25 Sep 12

bob the builder says...

It's all manmade problems from lack of investment and expenditure, and porr planning: not dredging rivers, not maintaining waterways or field ditches and building on floodplains. Successive governments have avoided this issue, but you can bet your souwester that when the South of England starts being reclaimed by the sea they will throw money at it, then all move up to the North they so despised inflating our property prices and making us even more worse off. I hope Scotland is independant by then and refuses to let them in!
It's all manmade problems from lack of investment and expenditure, and porr planning: not dredging rivers, not maintaining waterways or field ditches and building on floodplains. Successive governments have avoided this issue, but you can bet your souwester that when the South of England starts being reclaimed by the sea they will throw money at it, then all move up to the North they so despised inflating our property prices and making us even more worse off. I hope Scotland is independant by then and refuses to let them in! bob the builder
  • Score: 0

10:36am Tue 25 Sep 12

Firedrake says...

Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too.
Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too. Firedrake
  • Score: 0

10:40am Tue 25 Sep 12

Firedrake says...

PS: I mean the barge incident - not the problem of flooding per se!
PS: I mean the barge incident - not the problem of flooding per se! Firedrake
  • Score: 0

10:51am Tue 25 Sep 12

Tim Cronin says...

Very true. I personally think that water stilts would be of use here. We used them in the war. They were simply steel stansions which were then welded to the underside of boats and other such water going vehicles. They worked a treat and stopped all boats from sinking. Just a thought though as the boats were all completely ruined when these stilts were removed at a later date, as they had to be cut off the hulls. Maybe this isn`t a good idea after all.
Very true. I personally think that water stilts would be of use here. We used them in the war. They were simply steel stansions which were then welded to the underside of boats and other such water going vehicles. They worked a treat and stopped all boats from sinking. Just a thought though as the boats were all completely ruined when these stilts were removed at a later date, as they had to be cut off the hulls. Maybe this isn`t a good idea after all. Tim Cronin
  • Score: 0

10:52am Tue 25 Sep 12

Grumpy Old Man says...

Bob The Builder, you have it completely wrong. It's not the lack of good drainage in the main part; it's too much drainage causing the problems. In the old days, land soaked up water and released it slowly. It didn't stop flooding - we can't avoid that in this country - but you did have some time to prepare. The spread of concrete over the past 20 years however means that floodwater runs off immediately. Drains, ditches and rivers can't cope with the sudden influx and the water backs up. Blocked drains don't cause the problem, they just make it worse. And parts of York flood now which never used to in the old days. We don't need new technology to ease the problem, we need to take a step back and look at old technology. A good start would be to start ripping up all those concrete driveways. Gravel is just as effective and is more nature-friendly
Bob The Builder, you have it completely wrong. It's not the lack of good drainage in the main part; it's too much drainage causing the problems. In the old days, land soaked up water and released it slowly. It didn't stop flooding - we can't avoid that in this country - but you did have some time to prepare. The spread of concrete over the past 20 years however means that floodwater runs off immediately. Drains, ditches and rivers can't cope with the sudden influx and the water backs up. Blocked drains don't cause the problem, they just make it worse. And parts of York flood now which never used to in the old days. We don't need new technology to ease the problem, we need to take a step back and look at old technology. A good start would be to start ripping up all those concrete driveways. Gravel is just as effective and is more nature-friendly Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 0

10:53am Tue 25 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water.


Or was too busy singing 'My Heart Will Go On' as it slipped beneath the waves...
[quote]I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water.[/quote] Or was too busy singing 'My Heart Will Go On' as it slipped beneath the waves... Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

11:33am Tue 25 Sep 12

noblematt says...

If your going to use images from the York City Rowing Club Website/Webcam please credit them
If your going to use images from the York City Rowing Club Website/Webcam please credit them noblematt
  • Score: 0

11:45am Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.
The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

11:55am Tue 25 Sep 12

again says...

Yorkie41 wrote:
The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.
When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide.

There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick?
[quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.[/p][/quote]When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide. There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick? again
  • Score: -1

12:09pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

again wrote:
Yorkie41 wrote: The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.
When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide. There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick?
Sounds good to me, I did think that that may have contributed to what was happening. but I am a land lubber. HA HA! what would I know.
[quote][p][bold]again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.[/p][/quote]When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide. There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick?[/p][/quote]Sounds good to me, I did think that that may have contributed to what was happening. but I am a land lubber. HA HA! what would I know. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

12:52pm Tue 25 Sep 12

old_geezer says...

bob the builder: one of the biggest problems is the now-abandoned policy of paying farmers to put in "gripping", i.e. drainage ditches on the moors. This accelerates runoff at least a hundredfold, and never served much useful purpose, but hey, farmers were paid by the yard, so many hundreds of miles were dug. DEFRA/EA are now blocking them, but slowly because of budgets.
bob the builder: one of the biggest problems is the now-abandoned policy of paying farmers to put in "gripping", i.e. drainage ditches on the moors. This accelerates runoff at least a hundredfold, and never served much useful purpose, but hey, farmers were paid by the yard, so many hundreds of miles were dug. DEFRA/EA are now blocking them, but slowly because of budgets. old_geezer
  • Score: 0

1:45pm Tue 25 Sep 12

York1900 says...

Firedrake wrote:
Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too.
They could not do that it would spoil the look of York
[quote][p][bold]Firedrake[/bold] wrote: Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too.[/p][/quote]They could not do that it would spoil the look of York York1900
  • Score: 0

2:05pm Tue 25 Sep 12

LibDem says...

It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O
use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!. LibDem
  • Score: 0

2:09pm Tue 25 Sep 12

YSTClinguist says...

Looks like those donkeys aren't going to make it to the ark in time.
Looks like those donkeys aren't going to make it to the ark in time. YSTClinguist
  • Score: 0

2:36pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Oncebitten says...

Dredging.....just an idea!
Dredging.....just an idea! Oncebitten
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Tim Cronin says...

What about some type of barrier or flood diversion, maybe to Hull or something? Just a thought. Or very dry sand, that`ll swab a bit up!
What about some type of barrier or flood diversion, maybe to Hull or something? Just a thought. Or very dry sand, that`ll swab a bit up! Tim Cronin
  • Score: 0

3:08pm Tue 25 Sep 12

NoNewsIsGoodNews says...

LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O

use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
I blame Labour.

We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council.

What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.
[quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]I blame Labour. We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council. What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket. NoNewsIsGoodNews
  • Score: 0

3:13pm Tue 25 Sep 12

ReginaldBiscuit says...

NoNewsIsGoodNews wrote:
LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O


use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
I blame Labour.

We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council.

What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.
Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines.
[quote][p][bold]NoNewsIsGoodNews[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]I blame Labour. We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council. What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.[/p][/quote]Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines. ReginaldBiscuit
  • Score: 0

3:28pm Tue 25 Sep 12

NoNewsIsGoodNews says...

ReginaldBiscuit wrote:
NoNewsIsGoodNews wrote:
LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O



use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
I blame Labour.

We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council.

What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.
Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines.
Good point......

Seriously though, why does Galloway think we need a coloured warning?

It's been persisting down for two days straight, and we don't need an official jobsworth to tell us that sooner or later the river is going to come up.
[quote][p][bold]ReginaldBiscuit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]NoNewsIsGoodNews[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]I blame Labour. We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council. What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.[/p][/quote]Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines.[/p][/quote]Good point...... Seriously though, why does Galloway think we need a coloured warning? It's been persisting down for two days straight, and we don't need an official jobsworth to tell us that sooner or later the river is going to come up. NoNewsIsGoodNews
  • Score: 0

3:42pm Tue 25 Sep 12

tapatun says...

More photos from flooding York on TalkYork - http://talkyork.com/
galleries
More photos from flooding York on TalkYork - http://talkyork.com/ galleries tapatun
  • Score: 0

3:47pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Firedrake says...

Tim Cronin's suggestion of a "flood diversion" to Hull is intriguing. It was first proposed in the 1650s - not so much to relieve flooding so much as to create a direct navigation to the Humber. It might, I think, have achieved both ends; though I suspect the condition of the Ouse between York and Trent Falls would have deteriorated accordingly. Selby would have suffered and Goole and the port of Goole never constructed.
Tim Cronin's suggestion of a "flood diversion" to Hull is intriguing. It was first proposed in the 1650s - not so much to relieve flooding so much as to create a direct navigation to the Humber. It might, I think, have achieved both ends; though I suspect the condition of the Ouse between York and Trent Falls would have deteriorated accordingly. Selby would have suffered and Goole and the port of Goole never constructed. Firedrake
  • Score: 0

4:28pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

Oncebitten wrote:
Dredging.....just an idea!
They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening.
[quote][p][bold]Oncebitten[/bold] wrote: Dredging.....just an idea![/p][/quote]They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

4:28pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

Oncebitten wrote:
Dredging.....just an idea!
They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening.
[quote][p][bold]Oncebitten[/bold] wrote: Dredging.....just an idea![/p][/quote]They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

4:30pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Stretch says...

Hosepipe ban anyone?
Hosepipe ban anyone? Stretch
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Jazzper says...

Stretch wrote:
Hosepipe ban anyone?
Well...I certainly won't need to water my garden tonight!
[quote][p][bold]Stretch[/bold] wrote: Hosepipe ban anyone?[/p][/quote]Well...I certainly won't need to water my garden tonight! Jazzper
  • Score: 0

4:56pm Tue 25 Sep 12

redbluelion says...

with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..
with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england.. redbluelion
  • Score: 0

6:08pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

redbluelion wrote:
with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..
You're right - there's so much of it, it should be cheaper... except that because no-one has a clue what to do with the excess, we'll end up paying Yorkshire Water extra to get rid of it...
[quote][p][bold]redbluelion[/bold] wrote: with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..[/p][/quote]You're right - there's so much of it, it should be cheaper... except that because no-one has a clue what to do with the excess, we'll end up paying Yorkshire Water extra to get rid of it... Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 0

7:03pm Tue 25 Sep 12

greggy83 says...

Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch!
Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch! greggy83
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Tue 25 Sep 12

gjh says...

greggy83 wrote:
Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch!
The drainage has been designed to take the water that falls onto the carriageway. It has not been designed to take all the water that runs off from the many hectares of adjoining land onto the road as well. This applies to most highway drainage systems.
[quote][p][bold]greggy83[/bold] wrote: Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch![/p][/quote]The drainage has been designed to take the water that falls onto the carriageway. It has not been designed to take all the water that runs off from the many hectares of adjoining land onto the road as well. This applies to most highway drainage systems. gjh
  • Score: 0

8:18pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Seadog says...

Tim Cronin/Firedrake: Yes - but earlier than you think! This interesting idea was first explored around 1615/20 - at a time when Dutch engineers were being recruited to drain the vast Humberhead Levels, using the same technology which they'd already perfected in the Netherlands. As always, the political shenanigans regarding contracts and completion etc lead to delays which meant the project never actually came to fruition. (Nothing changes, does it?)

Then again, there were real social issues concerning the livelihood of the locals who depended on fishing and fowling: sometimes they rose up in armed revolt against the Dutch engineers, and bloody battles were fought around Thorne and Crowle. Who could blame them?

Anyway, the expert Dutch moved south into the Isle of Axeholme and - ultimately - into the fenlands of South Lincs and East Anglia, reclaiming the Wash hinterland on an almost unimaginable scale.

All this is very well documented in Baron F Duckham's "The Yorkshire Ouse: The History of a RIver Navigation" published by David and Charles of Newton Abbot in 1967, which remains by far the best and most informative work about our sometimes calm and majestic - sometimes volatile - but always intriguing highway to the sea.

Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens.
Tim Cronin/Firedrake: Yes - but earlier than you think! This interesting idea was first explored around 1615/20 - at a time when Dutch engineers were being recruited to drain the vast Humberhead Levels, using the same technology which they'd already perfected in the Netherlands. As always, the political shenanigans regarding contracts and completion etc lead to delays which meant the project never actually came to fruition. (Nothing changes, does it?) Then again, there were real social issues concerning the livelihood of the locals who depended on fishing and fowling: sometimes they rose up in armed revolt against the Dutch engineers, and bloody battles were fought around Thorne and Crowle. Who could blame them? Anyway, the expert Dutch moved south into the Isle of Axeholme and - ultimately - into the fenlands of South Lincs and East Anglia, reclaiming the Wash hinterland on an almost unimaginable scale. All this is very well documented in Baron F Duckham's "The Yorkshire Ouse: The History of a RIver Navigation" published by David and Charles of Newton Abbot in 1967, which remains by far the best and most informative work about our sometimes calm and majestic - sometimes volatile - but always intriguing highway to the sea. Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens. Seadog
  • Score: 0

8:46pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens.


Thanks! I'll certainly look out for that book. Sounds like the Dutch were proposing to build what would now be a bypass on an A-road. Not surprised that it got mired in politics - the descent into the civil war began more or less with the death of Elizabeth I in 1603, and by 1615-20, York, and specifically its status as a north-south transport hub, was already at the centre of a poisonous turf war. Sounds like a fascinating historical "what if?".

As for the narrow boat sinking, I love that ridiculous antenna sticking up out of the water in the photo. Kind of suggests that even when faced with the second coming, we'll probably have our eyes glued to some cacky reality TV show until the very last moment...
[quote]Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens.[/quote] Thanks! I'll certainly look out for that book. Sounds like the Dutch were proposing to build what would now be a bypass on an A-road. Not surprised that it got mired in politics - the descent into the civil war began more or less with the death of Elizabeth I in 1603, and by 1615-20, York, and specifically its status as a north-south transport hub, was already at the centre of a poisonous turf war. Sounds like a fascinating historical "what if?". As for the narrow boat sinking, I love that ridiculous antenna sticking up out of the water in the photo. Kind of suggests that even when faced with the second coming, we'll probably have our eyes glued to some cacky reality TV show until the very last moment... Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

8:49pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Back and Beyond says...

LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O

use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
The last update on the Environment Agency website for the Ouse in York was at 11.46am this morning where it stood at 10 Feet 5 inches.

I'm sure there will be many going to bed this evening reassured at the lack of information about expected levels in the City tomorrow! and it is still raining....
[quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]The last update on the Environment Agency website for the Ouse in York was at 11.46am this morning where it stood at 10 Feet 5 inches. I'm sure there will be many going to bed this evening reassured at the lack of information about expected levels in the City tomorrow! and it is still raining.... Back and Beyond
  • Score: 0

9:14pm Tue 25 Sep 12

yorkborn66 says...

Its not a strange phenomenon, Rain and Heavy rain in and around York.
I think what has changed over the decades is they way surface water is controlled, or not now been the case. The extra building and grass areas lost to concrete, inadequate drainage to manage this extra amount of water, and a river that is not dredged anymore, cannot take the extra water pouring into it.
Combine this the water coming down from the hills, we don’t really stand a chance do we. I accept the fact if it rains hard for a couple of days in York or in the Dales as well, we are going to get it, straight away or when the water comes down the vale. And if the scientists have it right, we wont have to worry about 20 mph roads and cyclists without lights in the near future, we will all be building our Arks to live in.
Its not a strange phenomenon, Rain and Heavy rain in and around York. I think what has changed over the decades is they way surface water is controlled, or not now been the case. The extra building and grass areas lost to concrete, inadequate drainage to manage this extra amount of water, and a river that is not dredged anymore, cannot take the extra water pouring into it. Combine this the water coming down from the hills, we don’t really stand a chance do we. I accept the fact if it rains hard for a couple of days in York or in the Dales as well, we are going to get it, straight away or when the water comes down the vale. And if the scientists have it right, we wont have to worry about 20 mph roads and cyclists without lights in the near future, we will all be building our Arks to live in. yorkborn66
  • Score: 0

9:44pm Tue 25 Sep 12

pedalling paul says...

I'll have to change my nom de plume to Paddling Paul.............
I'll have to change my nom de plume to Paddling Paul............. pedalling paul
  • Score: 0

9:56pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

redbluelion wrote:
with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..
They will say it is the wrong kind of rain HA HA!
[quote][p][bold]redbluelion[/bold] wrote: with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..[/p][/quote]They will say it is the wrong kind of rain HA HA! Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

8:01am Wed 26 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Just driven in to work (in Leeds) and the water level is VERY high on either side of the A64 passing Tadcaster. The football field next to the brewery on the northern side of the road is flooded almost to the top of the goalposts. If it goes up much further it'll start to affect the road, I'd guess.
Just driven in to work (in Leeds) and the water level is VERY high on either side of the A64 passing Tadcaster. The football field next to the brewery on the northern side of the road is flooded almost to the top of the goalposts. If it goes up much further it'll start to affect the road, I'd guess. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

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