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9:14am Tue 25 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Never mind the rain - I was nearly driven off the A64 by laughter, thanks to an Environment Agency spokesman on Radio Five who appeared to be having trouble with basic geography.

Presenter: 'And where are the real problem areas, that are at serious risk of flooding?'

EA moron: 'The north, and especially in the North West'.

Presenter: 'Are there any specific towns in the North West that we should be worried about?'

EA moron: 'Yes. We're especially worried about the risk of widespread property damage in Morpeth.
Never mind the rain - I was nearly driven off the A64 by laughter, thanks to an Environment Agency spokesman on Radio Five who appeared to be having trouble with basic geography. Presenter: 'And where are the real problem areas, that are at serious risk of flooding?' EA moron: 'The north, and especially in the North West'. Presenter: 'Are there any specific towns in the North West that we should be worried about?' EA moron: 'Yes. We're especially worried about the risk of widespread property damage in Morpeth. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

9:31am Tue 25 Sep 12

Peterwalker says...

Tee Hee
Tee Hee Peterwalker
  • Score: 0

9:50am Tue 25 Sep 12

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink.
9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink. Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 0

9:58am Tue 25 Sep 12

Jazzper says...

Looks more like a narrow boat to me, I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water.
Looks more like a narrow boat to me, I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water. Jazzper
  • Score: 0

10:25am Tue 25 Sep 12

Woody G Mellor says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink.
Obviously Viking long boats were more intelligent than today's long boats.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: 9.32am - A "long boat" capsizing? A bit of rain and a long boat capsizes? How did the Vikings ever conquer this country? They must be turning in their - er - funeral pyres at the thought that, after 1200 years, high water levels are finally starting to cause long boats to capsize and sink.[/p][/quote]Obviously Viking long boats were more intelligent than today's long boats. Woody G Mellor
  • Score: 0

10:36am Tue 25 Sep 12

bob the builder says...

It's all manmade problems from lack of investment and expenditure, and porr planning: not dredging rivers, not maintaining waterways or field ditches and building on floodplains. Successive governments have avoided this issue, but you can bet your souwester that when the South of England starts being reclaimed by the sea they will throw money at it, then all move up to the North they so despised inflating our property prices and making us even more worse off. I hope Scotland is independant by then and refuses to let them in!
It's all manmade problems from lack of investment and expenditure, and porr planning: not dredging rivers, not maintaining waterways or field ditches and building on floodplains. Successive governments have avoided this issue, but you can bet your souwester that when the South of England starts being reclaimed by the sea they will throw money at it, then all move up to the North they so despised inflating our property prices and making us even more worse off. I hope Scotland is independant by then and refuses to let them in! bob the builder
  • Score: 0

10:36am Tue 25 Sep 12

Firedrake says...

Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too.
Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too. Firedrake
  • Score: 0

10:40am Tue 25 Sep 12

Firedrake says...

PS: I mean the barge incident - not the problem of flooding per se!
PS: I mean the barge incident - not the problem of flooding per se! Firedrake
  • Score: 0

10:51am Tue 25 Sep 12

Tim Cronin says...

Very true. I personally think that water stilts would be of use here. We used them in the war. They were simply steel stansions which were then welded to the underside of boats and other such water going vehicles. They worked a treat and stopped all boats from sinking. Just a thought though as the boats were all completely ruined when these stilts were removed at a later date, as they had to be cut off the hulls. Maybe this isn`t a good idea after all.
Very true. I personally think that water stilts would be of use here. We used them in the war. They were simply steel stansions which were then welded to the underside of boats and other such water going vehicles. They worked a treat and stopped all boats from sinking. Just a thought though as the boats were all completely ruined when these stilts were removed at a later date, as they had to be cut off the hulls. Maybe this isn`t a good idea after all. Tim Cronin
  • Score: 0

10:52am Tue 25 Sep 12

Grumpy Old Man says...

Bob The Builder, you have it completely wrong. It's not the lack of good drainage in the main part; it's too much drainage causing the problems. In the old days, land soaked up water and released it slowly. It didn't stop flooding - we can't avoid that in this country - but you did have some time to prepare. The spread of concrete over the past 20 years however means that floodwater runs off immediately. Drains, ditches and rivers can't cope with the sudden influx and the water backs up. Blocked drains don't cause the problem, they just make it worse. And parts of York flood now which never used to in the old days. We don't need new technology to ease the problem, we need to take a step back and look at old technology. A good start would be to start ripping up all those concrete driveways. Gravel is just as effective and is more nature-friendly
Bob The Builder, you have it completely wrong. It's not the lack of good drainage in the main part; it's too much drainage causing the problems. In the old days, land soaked up water and released it slowly. It didn't stop flooding - we can't avoid that in this country - but you did have some time to prepare. The spread of concrete over the past 20 years however means that floodwater runs off immediately. Drains, ditches and rivers can't cope with the sudden influx and the water backs up. Blocked drains don't cause the problem, they just make it worse. And parts of York flood now which never used to in the old days. We don't need new technology to ease the problem, we need to take a step back and look at old technology. A good start would be to start ripping up all those concrete driveways. Gravel is just as effective and is more nature-friendly Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 0

10:53am Tue 25 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water.


Or was too busy singing 'My Heart Will Go On' as it slipped beneath the waves...
[quote]I suppose the owner must have left it unattended with mooring ropes too tight for the rising water.[/quote] Or was too busy singing 'My Heart Will Go On' as it slipped beneath the waves... Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

11:33am Tue 25 Sep 12

noblematt says...

If your going to use images from the York City Rowing Club Website/Webcam please credit them
If your going to use images from the York City Rowing Club Website/Webcam please credit them noblematt
  • Score: 0

11:45am Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.
The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

11:55am Tue 25 Sep 12

again says...

Yorkie41 wrote:
The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.
When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide.

There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick?
[quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.[/p][/quote]When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide. There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick? again
  • Score: -1

12:09pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

again wrote:
Yorkie41 wrote: The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.
When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide. There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick?
Sounds good to me, I did think that that may have contributed to what was happening. but I am a land lubber. HA HA! what would I know.
[quote][p][bold]again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: The Barge Recklaw was tied up on the foss for years and never sunk. I can't believe it.[/p][/quote]When you tie a boat up in tidal waters you have to allow for it to rise and fall with the tide. There is a cunning way of deploying the mooring ropes to enable the boat to do so. I guess fresh water mariners don't know the trick?[/p][/quote]Sounds good to me, I did think that that may have contributed to what was happening. but I am a land lubber. HA HA! what would I know. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

12:52pm Tue 25 Sep 12

old_geezer says...

bob the builder: one of the biggest problems is the now-abandoned policy of paying farmers to put in "gripping", i.e. drainage ditches on the moors. This accelerates runoff at least a hundredfold, and never served much useful purpose, but hey, farmers were paid by the yard, so many hundreds of miles were dug. DEFRA/EA are now blocking them, but slowly because of budgets.
bob the builder: one of the biggest problems is the now-abandoned policy of paying farmers to put in "gripping", i.e. drainage ditches on the moors. This accelerates runoff at least a hundredfold, and never served much useful purpose, but hey, farmers were paid by the yard, so many hundreds of miles were dug. DEFRA/EA are now blocking them, but slowly because of budgets. old_geezer
  • Score: 0

1:45pm Tue 25 Sep 12

York1900 says...

Firedrake wrote:
Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too.
They could not do that it would spoil the look of York
[quote][p][bold]Firedrake[/bold] wrote: Floating pontoons would eradicate this problem so long as the stanchions were tall enough. I think they've been suggested for the revamp near the Guildhall. Foss Basin would be a good location too.[/p][/quote]They could not do that it would spoil the look of York York1900
  • Score: 0

2:05pm Tue 25 Sep 12

LibDem says...

It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O
use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!. LibDem
  • Score: 0

2:09pm Tue 25 Sep 12

YSTClinguist says...

Looks like those donkeys aren't going to make it to the ark in time.
Looks like those donkeys aren't going to make it to the ark in time. YSTClinguist
  • Score: 0

2:36pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Oncebitten says...

Dredging.....just an idea!
Dredging.....just an idea! Oncebitten
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Tim Cronin says...

What about some type of barrier or flood diversion, maybe to Hull or something? Just a thought. Or very dry sand, that`ll swab a bit up!
What about some type of barrier or flood diversion, maybe to Hull or something? Just a thought. Or very dry sand, that`ll swab a bit up! Tim Cronin
  • Score: 0

3:08pm Tue 25 Sep 12

NoNewsIsGoodNews says...

LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O

use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
I blame Labour.

We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council.

What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.
[quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]I blame Labour. We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council. What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket. NoNewsIsGoodNews
  • Score: 0

3:13pm Tue 25 Sep 12

ReginaldBiscuit says...

NoNewsIsGoodNews wrote:
LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O


use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
I blame Labour.

We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council.

What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.
Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines.
[quote][p][bold]NoNewsIsGoodNews[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]I blame Labour. We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council. What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.[/p][/quote]Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines. ReginaldBiscuit
  • Score: 0

3:28pm Tue 25 Sep 12

NoNewsIsGoodNews says...

ReginaldBiscuit wrote:
NoNewsIsGoodNews wrote:
LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O



use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
I blame Labour.

We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council.

What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.
Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines.
Good point......

Seriously though, why does Galloway think we need a coloured warning?

It's been persisting down for two days straight, and we don't need an official jobsworth to tell us that sooner or later the river is going to come up.
[quote][p][bold]ReginaldBiscuit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]NoNewsIsGoodNews[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]I blame Labour. We never used to get floods like this under a Liberal Democrat run Council. What is James Alexander doing? he should be stood on Kings Staith with his bucket.[/p][/quote]Be rest assured. If there is an opportunity for publicity, a photo call or the chance to espouse council support for 'victims', James Alexander will be there trying to generate headlines.[/p][/quote]Good point...... Seriously though, why does Galloway think we need a coloured warning? It's been persisting down for two days straight, and we don't need an official jobsworth to tell us that sooner or later the river is going to come up. NoNewsIsGoodNews
  • Score: 0

3:42pm Tue 25 Sep 12

tapatun says...

More photos from flooding York on TalkYork - http://talkyork.com/
galleries
More photos from flooding York on TalkYork - http://talkyork.com/ galleries tapatun
  • Score: 0

3:47pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Firedrake says...

Tim Cronin's suggestion of a "flood diversion" to Hull is intriguing. It was first proposed in the 1650s - not so much to relieve flooding so much as to create a direct navigation to the Humber. It might, I think, have achieved both ends; though I suspect the condition of the Ouse between York and Trent Falls would have deteriorated accordingly. Selby would have suffered and Goole and the port of Goole never constructed.
Tim Cronin's suggestion of a "flood diversion" to Hull is intriguing. It was first proposed in the 1650s - not so much to relieve flooding so much as to create a direct navigation to the Humber. It might, I think, have achieved both ends; though I suspect the condition of the Ouse between York and Trent Falls would have deteriorated accordingly. Selby would have suffered and Goole and the port of Goole never constructed. Firedrake
  • Score: 0

4:28pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

Oncebitten wrote:
Dredging.....just an idea!
They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening.
[quote][p][bold]Oncebitten[/bold] wrote: Dredging.....just an idea![/p][/quote]They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

4:28pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

Oncebitten wrote:
Dredging.....just an idea!
They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening.
[quote][p][bold]Oncebitten[/bold] wrote: Dredging.....just an idea![/p][/quote]They used to dredge the Foss and the ouse a lot years ago, you never see that happening. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

4:30pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Stretch says...

Hosepipe ban anyone?
Hosepipe ban anyone? Stretch
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Jazzper says...

Stretch wrote:
Hosepipe ban anyone?
Well...I certainly won't need to water my garden tonight!
[quote][p][bold]Stretch[/bold] wrote: Hosepipe ban anyone?[/p][/quote]Well...I certainly won't need to water my garden tonight! Jazzper
  • Score: 0

4:56pm Tue 25 Sep 12

redbluelion says...

with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..
with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england.. redbluelion
  • Score: 0

6:08pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

redbluelion wrote:
with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..
You're right - there's so much of it, it should be cheaper... except that because no-one has a clue what to do with the excess, we'll end up paying Yorkshire Water extra to get rid of it...
[quote][p][bold]redbluelion[/bold] wrote: with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..[/p][/quote]You're right - there's so much of it, it should be cheaper... except that because no-one has a clue what to do with the excess, we'll end up paying Yorkshire Water extra to get rid of it... Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 0

7:03pm Tue 25 Sep 12

greggy83 says...

Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch!
Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch! greggy83
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Tue 25 Sep 12

gjh says...

greggy83 wrote:
Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch!
The drainage has been designed to take the water that falls onto the carriageway. It has not been designed to take all the water that runs off from the many hectares of adjoining land onto the road as well. This applies to most highway drainage systems.
[quote][p][bold]greggy83[/bold] wrote: Just a thought about the new stretch of A1 (M) between Dishforth and Leeming Bar - the road has only been open five minutes yet its drainage doesn't seem to be up to scratch![/p][/quote]The drainage has been designed to take the water that falls onto the carriageway. It has not been designed to take all the water that runs off from the many hectares of adjoining land onto the road as well. This applies to most highway drainage systems. gjh
  • Score: 0

8:18pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Seadog says...

Tim Cronin/Firedrake: Yes - but earlier than you think! This interesting idea was first explored around 1615/20 - at a time when Dutch engineers were being recruited to drain the vast Humberhead Levels, using the same technology which they'd already perfected in the Netherlands. As always, the political shenanigans regarding contracts and completion etc lead to delays which meant the project never actually came to fruition. (Nothing changes, does it?)

Then again, there were real social issues concerning the livelihood of the locals who depended on fishing and fowling: sometimes they rose up in armed revolt against the Dutch engineers, and bloody battles were fought around Thorne and Crowle. Who could blame them?

Anyway, the expert Dutch moved south into the Isle of Axeholme and - ultimately - into the fenlands of South Lincs and East Anglia, reclaiming the Wash hinterland on an almost unimaginable scale.

All this is very well documented in Baron F Duckham's "The Yorkshire Ouse: The History of a RIver Navigation" published by David and Charles of Newton Abbot in 1967, which remains by far the best and most informative work about our sometimes calm and majestic - sometimes volatile - but always intriguing highway to the sea.

Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens.
Tim Cronin/Firedrake: Yes - but earlier than you think! This interesting idea was first explored around 1615/20 - at a time when Dutch engineers were being recruited to drain the vast Humberhead Levels, using the same technology which they'd already perfected in the Netherlands. As always, the political shenanigans regarding contracts and completion etc lead to delays which meant the project never actually came to fruition. (Nothing changes, does it?) Then again, there were real social issues concerning the livelihood of the locals who depended on fishing and fowling: sometimes they rose up in armed revolt against the Dutch engineers, and bloody battles were fought around Thorne and Crowle. Who could blame them? Anyway, the expert Dutch moved south into the Isle of Axeholme and - ultimately - into the fenlands of South Lincs and East Anglia, reclaiming the Wash hinterland on an almost unimaginable scale. All this is very well documented in Baron F Duckham's "The Yorkshire Ouse: The History of a RIver Navigation" published by David and Charles of Newton Abbot in 1967, which remains by far the best and most informative work about our sometimes calm and majestic - sometimes volatile - but always intriguing highway to the sea. Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens. Seadog
  • Score: 0

8:46pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens.


Thanks! I'll certainly look out for that book. Sounds like the Dutch were proposing to build what would now be a bypass on an A-road. Not surprised that it got mired in politics - the descent into the civil war began more or less with the death of Elizabeth I in 1603, and by 1615-20, York, and specifically its status as a north-south transport hub, was already at the centre of a poisonous turf war. Sounds like a fascinating historical "what if?".

As for the narrow boat sinking, I love that ridiculous antenna sticking up out of the water in the photo. Kind of suggests that even when faced with the second coming, we'll probably have our eyes glued to some cacky reality TV show until the very last moment...
[quote]Sorry to go on about it, but it's a truly fascinating (and relatively unknown) story whose resonances still shape our relationship with the river ... as witness that unfortunate sinking next to the Museum Gardens.[/quote] Thanks! I'll certainly look out for that book. Sounds like the Dutch were proposing to build what would now be a bypass on an A-road. Not surprised that it got mired in politics - the descent into the civil war began more or less with the death of Elizabeth I in 1603, and by 1615-20, York, and specifically its status as a north-south transport hub, was already at the centre of a poisonous turf war. Sounds like a fascinating historical "what if?". As for the narrow boat sinking, I love that ridiculous antenna sticking up out of the water in the photo. Kind of suggests that even when faced with the second coming, we'll probably have our eyes glued to some cacky reality TV show until the very last moment... Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

8:49pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Back and Beyond says...

LibDem wrote:
It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite).

http://tinyurl.com/O

use-catchment

All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear?

A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.
The last update on the Environment Agency website for the Ouse in York was at 11.46am this morning where it stood at 10 Feet 5 inches.

I'm sure there will be many going to bed this evening reassured at the lack of information about expected levels in the City tomorrow! and it is still raining....
[quote][p][bold]LibDem[/bold] wrote: It looks like according to the Environment Agency web site, record high levels are being reached on the Swale (Catterick Bridge), Ure (Ripon) and Nidd (Gouthwaite). http://tinyurl.com/O use-catchment All this water will be heading for York so it’s mildly reassuring that neither the Council nor emergency services seem to be concerned enough to issue high level warnings or put their contingency plans into gear? A lot, of course, depends on when it stops raining!.[/p][/quote]The last update on the Environment Agency website for the Ouse in York was at 11.46am this morning where it stood at 10 Feet 5 inches. I'm sure there will be many going to bed this evening reassured at the lack of information about expected levels in the City tomorrow! and it is still raining.... Back and Beyond
  • Score: 0

9:14pm Tue 25 Sep 12

yorkborn66 says...

Its not a strange phenomenon, Rain and Heavy rain in and around York.
I think what has changed over the decades is they way surface water is controlled, or not now been the case. The extra building and grass areas lost to concrete, inadequate drainage to manage this extra amount of water, and a river that is not dredged anymore, cannot take the extra water pouring into it.
Combine this the water coming down from the hills, we don’t really stand a chance do we. I accept the fact if it rains hard for a couple of days in York or in the Dales as well, we are going to get it, straight away or when the water comes down the vale. And if the scientists have it right, we wont have to worry about 20 mph roads and cyclists without lights in the near future, we will all be building our Arks to live in.
Its not a strange phenomenon, Rain and Heavy rain in and around York. I think what has changed over the decades is they way surface water is controlled, or not now been the case. The extra building and grass areas lost to concrete, inadequate drainage to manage this extra amount of water, and a river that is not dredged anymore, cannot take the extra water pouring into it. Combine this the water coming down from the hills, we don’t really stand a chance do we. I accept the fact if it rains hard for a couple of days in York or in the Dales as well, we are going to get it, straight away or when the water comes down the vale. And if the scientists have it right, we wont have to worry about 20 mph roads and cyclists without lights in the near future, we will all be building our Arks to live in. yorkborn66
  • Score: 0

9:44pm Tue 25 Sep 12

pedalling paul says...

I'll have to change my nom de plume to Paddling Paul.............
I'll have to change my nom de plume to Paddling Paul............. pedalling paul
  • Score: 0

9:56pm Tue 25 Sep 12

Yorkie41 says...

redbluelion wrote:
with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..
They will say it is the wrong kind of rain HA HA!
[quote][p][bold]redbluelion[/bold] wrote: with all this rain now are yorkshire water going to charge us less for water its getting a bit much the price of water..something we are never really short of in england..[/p][/quote]They will say it is the wrong kind of rain HA HA! Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

8:01am Wed 26 Sep 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Just driven in to work (in Leeds) and the water level is VERY high on either side of the A64 passing Tadcaster. The football field next to the brewery on the northern side of the road is flooded almost to the top of the goalposts. If it goes up much further it'll start to affect the road, I'd guess.
Just driven in to work (in Leeds) and the water level is VERY high on either side of the A64 passing Tadcaster. The football field next to the brewery on the northern side of the road is flooded almost to the top of the goalposts. If it goes up much further it'll start to affect the road, I'd guess. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

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