City of York Council to operate two new super care homes for elderly

An artist’s impression of the new  Haxby Hall care home

An artist’s impression of the new Haxby Hall care home

First published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

COUNCIL chiefs look set to build and operate two new super care homes in York in line with public demand – even though using private operators would save the authority £24 million over 26 years.

However, City of York Council is likely to go out to tender to procure a private partner for a proposed separate care village – or “community village for older people”.

Coun Tracey Simpson Laing, cabinet member for health, housing and social services, said the recommendations to cabinet were a balance between residents’ views and the financial implications of decisions.

The proposals are the latest twist in a lengthy programme to close the city’s nine outdated care homes and replace them with state-of-the-art care homes at Fordlands in Fulford and at Haxby Hall in Haxby.

There would also be a care village on the six-acre former Lowfields School site, featuring 90 care beds and possibly affordable housing and apartments.

Officers say Oliver House care home in Bishophill and the existing Fordlands home have now closed, saving the authority £1.1 million a year.

They said detailed financial evaluation of the options available for building and running the two new homes and care village had shown that the most viable option was for the three sites to be operated by the independent sector.

This would save £24 million, with further annual savings of £1.8 million thereafter, by the time capital repayments finished after 26 years.

However, 86 per cent of people who responded to a consultation last year were keen for the council to fund, build and operate the care homes.

The cabinet is being recommended to fund, build and operate the new home at Fordlands and, in principle, to operate the Haxby Hall home – subject to financial circumstances in August next year when a final decision must be made.

This option would save £1.1 million after 26 years and then savings of £870,000 a year.

But officers say no care villages in the UK have been designed, built and operated by a local authority on its own and, because of its complexity, the cabinet is being recommended to procure a private partner to fund, build and operate it. The council’s own in-house service would be able to compete for this work alongside external providers.

New lease of life

OLIVER House, which closed in March, looks set to be leased out to provide city centre “health and wellbeing facilities”.

The cabinet will consider four potential uses for the site in Bishophill: as a health and social care hub involving the voluntary sector, leasing it to York St John University for use as student accommodation, affordable housing or an open market sale.

Officers recommend granting a 20-year lease to a voluntary sector management group, which would provide city centre health and wellbeing facilities, including an autism centre and a specialist renal facility.

The site could also be used by health/wellbeing organisations currently operating from Holgate Villas. The lease would provide income that will be reinvested in care facilities for older people.

Comments (4)

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11:01am Tue 8 May 12

YorkToff says...

Super - apart from the oft overlooked fact that many people could continue living in their own homes or with children should the care and cash be available from government.
Super - apart from the oft overlooked fact that many people could continue living in their own homes or with children should the care and cash be available from government. YorkToff
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Tue 8 May 12

Jiffy says...

"The cabinet will consider four potential uses for the site in Bishophill: as a health and social care hub involving the voluntary sector, leasing it to York St John University for use as student accommodation, affordable housing or an open market sale."

Now let me think, wonder which it will be as St Johns is buying up most of York that comes up for sale at the minute and didn't a certain someone used to work for them, or is that just me being cynical!!!
"The cabinet will consider four potential uses for the site in Bishophill: as a health and social care hub involving the voluntary sector, leasing it to York St John University for use as student accommodation, affordable housing or an open market sale." Now let me think, wonder which it will be as St Johns is buying up most of York that comes up for sale at the minute and didn't a certain someone used to work for them, or is that just me being cynical!!! Jiffy
  • Score: 0

7:24pm Tue 8 May 12

only human says...

pay peanuts and get chimps.These places ring of the old institutional style places of years gone by.fact is many elderly people would much prefer to continue to reside in their own homes for as long as the care and support network permits.This option is the most economic for the private payee or the taxman.
It is a well known fact that the handful of elderly who live in local authority sheltered housing in York save the system millions per year compared to the cost of housing them within any care home.
My own nanna continues to live in such a scheme and recently had a spell in hospital where residential care was suggested as the best option for discharge.
Better for the local authority who are in the process of dismantling the sheltered housing complexes in york in preparation for selling them on to the private sector.
My nanna has the right to choose to stay in her own home and thats where she will remain for as long as she so wishes.having worked hard all her life its only fair and proper for her to have a choice.The cost to the taxman is £29 pwk in subsidies to my nannas income from pensions and savings etc.
On the other hand we were told that in comparison the average cost to the taxman for her to be held in a care home would be around £490 pwk...which is double her income including her rent.
So i am curious as to where the human rights to choice dignity and social interaction come into these so called super homes.
call me cynical but exactly what are the super about,size,piece work or getting the job done as cheaply as possible through cheap labour and production line style care.
pay peanuts and get chimps.These places ring of the old institutional style places of years gone by.fact is many elderly people would much prefer to continue to reside in their own homes for as long as the care and support network permits.This option is the most economic for the private payee or the taxman. It is a well known fact that the handful of elderly who live in local authority sheltered housing in York save the system millions per year compared to the cost of housing them within any care home. My own nanna continues to live in such a scheme and recently had a spell in hospital where residential care was suggested as the best option for discharge. Better for the local authority who are in the process of dismantling the sheltered housing complexes in york in preparation for selling them on to the private sector. My nanna has the right to choose to stay in her own home and thats where she will remain for as long as she so wishes.having worked hard all her life its only fair and proper for her to have a choice.The cost to the taxman is £29 pwk in subsidies to my nannas income from pensions and savings etc. On the other hand we were told that in comparison the average cost to the taxman for her to be held in a care home would be around £490 pwk...which is double her income including her rent. So i am curious as to where the human rights to choice dignity and social interaction come into these so called super homes. call me cynical but exactly what are the super about,size,piece work or getting the job done as cheaply as possible through cheap labour and production line style care. only human
  • Score: 0

9:10pm Wed 9 May 12

YorkToff says...

Replace York councillors with Mary Portas - she could organise the city much better than the lot of them put together.
Replace York councillors with Mary Portas - she could organise the city much better than the lot of them put together. YorkToff
  • Score: 0

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