River Ouse could help heat hundreds of York homes

The River Ouse may provide an energy source

The River Ouse may provide an energy source

First published in News
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THE River Ouse could provide clean, reliable heating to hundreds of homes and businesses in York, Government experts have claimed.

A map published by the Department of Energy & Climate Change indicates that the Ouse is one of about 40 urban rivers and estuaries that could provide large-scale renewable heating supplies to local communities through water source heat pumps, instead of traditional gas-fired or electric domestic heating.

The rivers and estuaries are said to be able to accommodate heat pumps with the capacity to each generate more than 1 megawatt of power – which is enough to provide heating and hot water to around 400 - 500 homes.

A spokesman said such heat pumps operated by taking heat from the water and feeding it into local heat networks or single buildings, providing a low-carbon source of renewable heat .

He said the map was the first of its kind to be published in the UK and was designed to help local authorities, private developers and community groups identify prime locations to install large water source heat pumps, by aligning suitable bodies of water with areas where there was a high demand for heat.

Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey said it 'sounds like magic' but proven technology meant heat could now be extracted from some of the heat in the water to heat homes and offices.

“I want to help communities across England use our waterways for this renewable heat and this new map is designed to help communities, councils and developers identify the most promising opportunities," he said.

"If we can succeed on the large scale, it would cut Britain’s import bill and boost our home-grown supplies of clean, secure energy.”

Green York councillor Dave Taylor, whose Fishergate ward includes the Ouse, said: "It sounds like an excellent idea, and York should be investigating this form of renewable energy from water, rather than fracking, which would poison our water."

He added that he had already discussed the potential for using the Ouse for heating with Conservative York councillor Tony Richardson, who had an expertise in the area.

Coun Richardson, who is a water engineer, said: "It's good news. I have always said we should be making better use of the resources we have, such as water, to create renewable energy - and it's good for the environment."

Comments (34)

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9:21am Tue 12 Aug 14

julia brica says...

Yes spend a couple of million to heat a couple of rooms all in the name of green energy.
Then again we are doing that already with wind turbines.
Load it onto all our fuel bills. Burden us all with another madcap scheme after all they got away with the last one.
Yes spend a couple of million to heat a couple of rooms all in the name of green energy. Then again we are doing that already with wind turbines. Load it onto all our fuel bills. Burden us all with another madcap scheme after all they got away with the last one. julia brica
  • Score: -19

9:26am Tue 12 Aug 14

meme says...

ITS A GREAT IDEA
ITS A GREAT IDEA meme
  • Score: 11

9:26am Tue 12 Aug 14

julia brica says...

Tony Richardson has an expertise in this area ?
So does Anna. Her roof says it all.
Ed Davey says its magic !
Anything that green zealot backs will be expensive for us all.
Tony Richardson has an expertise in this area ? So does Anna. Her roof says it all. Ed Davey says its magic ! Anything that green zealot backs will be expensive for us all. julia brica
  • Score: -14

9:36am Tue 12 Aug 14

gwen4me says...

Have there been any postings done yet?
Have there been any postings done yet? gwen4me
  • Score: -4

9:38am Tue 12 Aug 14

nearlyman says...

Is it April 1st ?
Is it April 1st ? nearlyman
  • Score: -5

9:41am Tue 12 Aug 14

smudge2 says...

The only way to keep Britain powered is down the nuclear route which the government finally realises with its current power station build plans.
The only way to keep Britain powered is down the nuclear route which the government finally realises with its current power station build plans. smudge2
  • Score: 19

10:11am Tue 12 Aug 14

gwen4me says...

Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport. gwen4me
  • Score: 20

10:12am Tue 12 Aug 14

gwen4me says...

gwen4me wrote:
Have there been any postings done yet?
Sorry I meant costings.
[quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Have there been any postings done yet?[/p][/quote]Sorry I meant costings. gwen4me
  • Score: 9

10:22am Tue 12 Aug 14

smudge2 says...

gwen4me wrote:
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .
[quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.[/p][/quote]Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly . smudge2
  • Score: -22

10:25am Tue 12 Aug 14

bonobo says...

Bloody green zealots with their bloody hippy , impractical ideas !!
Has anyone actually checked out what the cheapest electric tariff is in the country and how that energy is produced ?
Research it and open your eyes and stop dragging your heels
Bloody green zealots with their bloody hippy , impractical ideas !! Has anyone actually checked out what the cheapest electric tariff is in the country and how that energy is produced ? Research it and open your eyes and stop dragging your heels bonobo
  • Score: 3

10:39am Tue 12 Aug 14

bonobo says...

And research exactly what energy suppliers receive subsidies and stop blaming it on us 'greenies' or ' not sticking our heads in the sand and pointing the fingers '-ies as we should be known
And research exactly what energy suppliers receive subsidies and stop blaming it on us 'greenies' or ' not sticking our heads in the sand and pointing the fingers '-ies as we should be known bonobo
  • Score: 26

11:29am Tue 12 Aug 14

SelbyLady says...

I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland.

We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)
I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland. We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-) SelbyLady
  • Score: 30

12:43pm Tue 12 Aug 14

gwen4me says...

SelbyLady wrote:
I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland.

We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)
Excellent idea, they should put barrages across all the major estuaries and use the tide to generate power. Ships could go through locks. The tide movers around the coast so would generate power at different times and provide continuous power.
[quote][p][bold]SelbyLady[/bold] wrote: I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland. We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)[/p][/quote]Excellent idea, they should put barrages across all the major estuaries and use the tide to generate power. Ships could go through locks. The tide movers around the coast so would generate power at different times and provide continuous power. gwen4me
  • Score: 21

1:20pm Tue 12 Aug 14

BL2 says...

smudge2 wrote:
gwen4me wrote:
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .
Utter rubbish - its does and is in use on a large scale elsewhere in the world! Other sources of energy are finite and WILL run out. Costs come down as production levels increase. There are already solar panels on the way which are much more efficient and much cheaper to produce. The more money is put into renewable research and usage instead of wasting it on fossil fuels and nuclear power the cheaper it will become.
[quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.[/p][/quote]Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .[/p][/quote]Utter rubbish - its does and is in use on a large scale elsewhere in the world! Other sources of energy are finite and WILL run out. Costs come down as production levels increase. There are already solar panels on the way which are much more efficient and much cheaper to produce. The more money is put into renewable research and usage instead of wasting it on fossil fuels and nuclear power the cheaper it will become. BL2
  • Score: 21

1:39pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Not-Dotty says...

"A spokesman said such heat pumps operated by taking heat from the water and feeding it into local heat networks or single buildings, providing a low-carbon source of renewable heat ."

So does this locally lower the temperature of the water in the river? And if so, how does that affect the ecology of the river?

On the one hand this sounds like a brilliant idea, but can we have some investigative journalism to tell us the whole story, rather than an advert please?
"A spokesman said such heat pumps operated by taking heat from the water and feeding it into local heat networks or single buildings, providing a low-carbon source of renewable heat ." So does this locally lower the temperature of the water in the river? And if so, how does that affect the ecology of the river? On the one hand this sounds like a brilliant idea, but can we have some investigative journalism to tell us the whole story, rather than an advert please? Not-Dotty
  • Score: 24

2:16pm Tue 12 Aug 14

bonobo says...

https://www.gov.uk/g
overnment/publicatio
ns/water-source-heat
-map
https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/publicatio ns/water-source-heat -map bonobo
  • Score: 2

3:07pm Tue 12 Aug 14

piaggio1 says...

And at the same time.....germany plans too open more coal mines..
And as for china. !!!!
And our old mates over the channel use nuclear ...mmmmmm.
And at the same time.....germany plans too open more coal mines.. And as for china. !!!! And our old mates over the channel use nuclear ...mmmmmm. piaggio1
  • Score: 1

3:13pm Tue 12 Aug 14

smudge2 says...

BL2 wrote:
smudge2 wrote:
gwen4me wrote:
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .
Utter rubbish - its does and is in use on a large scale elsewhere in the world! Other sources of energy are finite and WILL run out. Costs come down as production levels increase. There are already solar panels on the way which are much more efficient and much cheaper to produce. The more money is put into renewable research and usage instead of wasting it on fossil fuels and nuclear power the cheaper it will become.
Yet another brain washed renewable power candidate . Well done !!
[quote][p][bold]BL2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.[/p][/quote]Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .[/p][/quote]Utter rubbish - its does and is in use on a large scale elsewhere in the world! Other sources of energy are finite and WILL run out. Costs come down as production levels increase. There are already solar panels on the way which are much more efficient and much cheaper to produce. The more money is put into renewable research and usage instead of wasting it on fossil fuels and nuclear power the cheaper it will become.[/p][/quote]Yet another brain washed renewable power candidate . Well done !! smudge2
  • Score: -11

3:18pm Tue 12 Aug 14

MartyntheC says...

Please, someone, let me know where this map is that DECC have produced.
By the way, if anyone wants to understand why we've never seen any TV ads for the Feed In Tariff, think on this:
Since April 2010 we all have been paying an extra 10% on our electricity bills towards a "Green Levy". Domestic household electricity bills might be about £500 a year (mine is). So we all are paying about £50 towards this fund every year and there are 22 million homes in the UK. That's equal to about £150 million per year, from domestic bills, every year, going into somebody's coffers. Plus non-domestic bills (offices, factories, hospitals and schools etc.) So we might say about £500 million into those coffers. Whose coffers? Well the government didn't want to administer this scheme when it was set up, so they handed it over to the Big 6, having agreed with them that this money would pay those people who set up solar panels on their roof if they asked for the Feed In Tariff. Now, I don't know about the rest of you, but if I were one of the Big6 with all that money sloshing around in my bank account earning interest every night, I'd probably keep quiet about it. Added to which, the Big 6 are the very same people who make money from us by selling us electricity - they don't want us to generate our own electricity. Two big fat reasons for the lack of understanding among ordinary people about the Feed In Tariff.
Now to those people who say renewable energy doesn't work I'd say this: try not to talk utter **** about stuff you don't understand. The Feed In Tariff was the UK's (belated) attempt to copy what had been successfully done in Germany and plenty of other clear-thinking countries. These artificial financial incentives are there to stimulate a market which ultimately will demand mass production, leading to economies of scale and the lowering of the price of the product. In the case of solar PV, it has indeed achieved that: you may remember a couple of years ago everyone was clucking about the Feed In Tariff being slashed and there is a school of thought that says that solar PV is no longer worth it. Again: ****. In the case of wind turbines and run-of-river hydro turbines, the reduction in product cost has not happened because of objectionism in the communities where they were to be installed. Those market sectors have not enjoyed an artificially induced boost, so the price of the product has remained very high.
In answer to other questions: yes, heat pumps in a river will lower the temperature of the water in that vicinity by a small amount for a few seconds, but the mass of water in the river that is not affected soon equalises out the temperature so there is no ecological impact.
Solar panels are unsightly? I can't argue with that sort of value judgement. I just happen to think that they, and wind turbines, may or may not be intrinsically beautiful, but to me they symbolise something good.
Please, someone, let me know where this map is that DECC have produced. By the way, if anyone wants to understand why we've never seen any TV ads for the Feed In Tariff, think on this: Since April 2010 we all have been paying an extra 10% on our electricity bills towards a "Green Levy". Domestic household electricity bills might be about £500 a year (mine is). So we all are paying about £50 towards this fund every year and there are 22 million homes in the UK. That's equal to about £150 million per year, from domestic bills, every year, going into somebody's coffers. Plus non-domestic bills (offices, factories, hospitals and schools etc.) So we might say about £500 million into those coffers. Whose coffers? Well the government didn't want to administer this scheme when it was set up, so they handed it over to the Big 6, having agreed with them that this money would pay those people who set up solar panels on their roof if they asked for the Feed In Tariff. Now, I don't know about the rest of you, but if I were one of the Big6 with all that money sloshing around in my bank account earning interest every night, I'd probably keep quiet about it. Added to which, the Big 6 are the very same people who make money from us by selling us electricity - they don't want us to generate our own electricity. Two big fat reasons for the lack of understanding among ordinary people about the Feed In Tariff. Now to those people who say renewable energy doesn't work I'd say this: try not to talk utter **** about stuff you don't understand. The Feed In Tariff was the UK's (belated) attempt to copy what had been successfully done in Germany and plenty of other clear-thinking countries. These artificial financial incentives are there to stimulate a market which ultimately will demand mass production, leading to economies of scale and the lowering of the price of the product. In the case of solar PV, it has indeed achieved that: you may remember a couple of years ago everyone was clucking about the Feed In Tariff being slashed and there is a school of thought that says that solar PV is no longer worth it. Again: ****. In the case of wind turbines and run-of-river hydro turbines, the reduction in product cost has not happened because of objectionism in the communities where they were to be installed. Those market sectors have not enjoyed an artificially induced boost, so the price of the product has remained very high. In answer to other questions: yes, heat pumps in a river will lower the temperature of the water in that vicinity by a small amount for a few seconds, but the mass of water in the river that is not affected soon equalises out the temperature so there is no ecological impact. Solar panels are unsightly? I can't argue with that sort of value judgement. I just happen to think that they, and wind turbines, may or may not be intrinsically beautiful, but to me they symbolise something good. MartyntheC
  • Score: 15

3:55pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Wanderer in Canada says...

Heat pumps are not free energy but do provide a free multiplying factor on energy used for heating or cooling.

They are widely used and supported with grants in Canada due to the variance found in houses over the external ambient temperature, as used in the two main seasons (winter and summer).

If you want to learn more about the process before dismissing the technology outright, a comprehensive description is given here - http://www.nrcan.gc.
ca /energy /publications /efficiency /heating-heat-pump /6831 (remove spaces)
Heat pumps are not free energy but do provide a free multiplying factor on energy used for heating or cooling. They are widely used and supported with grants in Canada due to the variance found in houses over the external ambient temperature, as used in the two main seasons (winter and summer). If you want to learn more about the process before dismissing the technology outright, a comprehensive description is given here - http://www.nrcan.gc. ca /energy /publications /efficiency /heating-heat-pump /6831 (remove spaces) Wanderer in Canada
  • Score: 10

5:20pm Tue 12 Aug 14

DEKKA says...

smudge2 wrote:
gwen4me wrote:
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .
Incorrect. Our panels will pay for themselves in less than 10 years then it is all clear profit.
[quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.[/p][/quote]Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .[/p][/quote]Incorrect. Our panels will pay for themselves in less than 10 years then it is all clear profit. DEKKA
  • Score: 9

6:19pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Pinza-C55 says...

SelbyLady wrote:
I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland.

We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)
I Googled this question and as far as I remember all the feasible dam sites have been used.
Scotland won't apply when they vote for independence unless they sell us some of their juice.
[quote][p][bold]SelbyLady[/bold] wrote: I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland. We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)[/p][/quote]I Googled this question and as far as I remember all the feasible dam sites have been used. Scotland won't apply when they vote for independence unless they sell us some of their juice. Pinza-C55
  • Score: -5

8:04pm Tue 12 Aug 14

smudge2 says...

DEKKA wrote:
smudge2 wrote:
gwen4me wrote:
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .
Incorrect. Our panels will pay for themselves in less than 10 years then it is all clear profit.
Our friend foolishly had them fitted and over half failed after 5 years and she took the rest down..The fitter of course told her they had a very long life span.. (He would of course as he charged her an arm and a leg for them and the company folded after 3 years and then set up under a new name and would not honour any of the old orders he sold )!
[quote][p][bold]DEKKA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.[/p][/quote]Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .[/p][/quote]Incorrect. Our panels will pay for themselves in less than 10 years then it is all clear profit.[/p][/quote]Our friend foolishly had them fitted and over half failed after 5 years and she took the rest down..The fitter of course told her they had a very long life span.. (He would of course as he charged her an arm and a leg for them and the company folded after 3 years and then set up under a new name and would not honour any of the old orders he sold )! smudge2
  • Score: -5

8:39pm Tue 12 Aug 14

gwen4me says...

Pinza-C55 wrote:
SelbyLady wrote:
I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland.

We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)
I Googled this question and as far as I remember all the feasible dam sites have been used.
Scotland won't apply when they vote for independence unless they sell us some of their juice.
Prime suitable site for tidal power would be the severn estuary. There are others that would be suitable as well.
[quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SelbyLady[/bold] wrote: I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland. We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)[/p][/quote]I Googled this question and as far as I remember all the feasible dam sites have been used. Scotland won't apply when they vote for independence unless they sell us some of their juice.[/p][/quote]Prime suitable site for tidal power would be the severn estuary. There are others that would be suitable as well. gwen4me
  • Score: 9

9:26pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Vine Weevil says...

For those who do not understand what a Heat Pump is, I suggest you look at the back of your fridge. They are in fact not super-modern renewable technology but a very old and expensive form of electric heating. Back in the early 1950's they were the latest fashion, but so was building huge dams and flooding entire valleys to provide hydro-electricity, building huge dirty coal fired power stations and of course building nuclear power stations, just like Chernobyl, Three Mile Island or Fukushima.
They can be made to work sensibly in certain circumstances, for example by moving heat from a hotel kitchen to the bedrooms. On the other hand using river water to heat buildings has been tried and failed. Using it to cool buildings in summer is more sensible, but hardly a No.1 priority in York.
For those who do not understand what a Heat Pump is, I suggest you look at the back of your fridge. They are in fact not super-modern renewable technology but a very old and expensive form of electric heating. Back in the early 1950's they were the latest fashion, but so was building huge dams and flooding entire valleys to provide hydro-electricity, building huge dirty coal fired power stations and of course building nuclear power stations, just like Chernobyl, Three Mile Island or Fukushima. They can be made to work sensibly in certain circumstances, for example by moving heat from a hotel kitchen to the bedrooms. On the other hand using river water to heat buildings has been tried and failed. Using it to cool buildings in summer is more sensible, but hardly a No.1 priority in York. Vine Weevil
  • Score: -4

10:01pm Tue 12 Aug 14

Yorkkeiyyer says...

Could there be an opportunity for private companies to offer heat for sale against private investment?
Smudge - people build credibility by not commenting on everything
Could there be an opportunity for private companies to offer heat for sale against private investment? Smudge - people build credibility by not commenting on everything Yorkkeiyyer
  • Score: 3

10:11pm Tue 12 Aug 14

pedalling paul says...

What will we do when the sun burns out..........
What will we do when the sun burns out.......... pedalling paul
  • Score: 16

4:08am Wed 13 Aug 14

Magicman! says...

A quick thought... for the river to be used to heat houses, surely the water in the river would need to have *some heat* in it in the first place... when people want their houses heated up, ie during October through to March, normally the river is quite cold (so much that it can freeze over) - so what sort of black magic can take ice cold water to heat up a house??

Even the closest idea which I can relate it to, the reverse of how a fridge works, still wouldn't provide anywhere near enough BTU to heat up houses.

Just stick some hydroelectric turbines on the river at Naburn Lock where the freshwater flows out into the tidal river... and stick some turbines on the outflows from reservoirs up in the Dales and Moors, just like they do in Wales (even in the heart of the Snowdonia National Park)
A quick thought... for the river to be used to heat houses, surely the water in the river would need to have *some heat* in it in the first place... when people want their houses heated up, ie during October through to March, normally the river is quite cold (so much that it can freeze over) - so what sort of black magic can take ice cold water to heat up a house?? Even the closest idea which I can relate it to, the reverse of how a fridge works, still wouldn't provide anywhere near enough BTU to heat up houses. Just stick some hydroelectric turbines on the river at Naburn Lock where the freshwater flows out into the tidal river... and stick some turbines on the outflows from reservoirs up in the Dales and Moors, just like they do in Wales (even in the heart of the Snowdonia National Park) Magicman!
  • Score: -2

9:21am Wed 13 Aug 14

julia brica says...

gwen4me wrote:
Pinza-C55 wrote:
SelbyLady wrote:
I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland.

We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)
I Googled this question and as far as I remember all the feasible dam sites have been used.
Scotland won't apply when they vote for independence unless they sell us some of their juice.
Prime suitable site for tidal power would be the severn estuary. There are others that would be suitable as well.
The severn estuary is indeed one of the best places for a hydro scheme.
High tidefall and reliably going in and out twice a day.
Unfortunately the eco lobby and friends of wading birds put the clappers on that one a long time ago.
[quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SelbyLady[/bold] wrote: I still don't know why they aren't harnessing the tidal flow of the river for hydro-power like they do in Scotland. We have solar panels and the electric company keep reducing our DD for our electric :-)[/p][/quote]I Googled this question and as far as I remember all the feasible dam sites have been used. Scotland won't apply when they vote for independence unless they sell us some of their juice.[/p][/quote]Prime suitable site for tidal power would be the severn estuary. There are others that would be suitable as well.[/p][/quote]The severn estuary is indeed one of the best places for a hydro scheme. High tidefall and reliably going in and out twice a day. Unfortunately the eco lobby and friends of wading birds put the clappers on that one a long time ago. julia brica
  • Score: 4

1:49pm Wed 13 Aug 14

BethFoxhunter96 says...

bonobo wrote:
Bloody green zealots with their bloody hippy , impractical ideas !!
Has anyone actually checked out what the cheapest electric tariff is in the country and how that energy is produced ?
Research it and open your eyes and stop dragging your heels
Ground source heat pumps are widely used and are not really part of "renewable energy". They require lots of electricity to make them work. However, this energy is generally used to pump water, rather than make heat, which makes it more efficient than directly heating homes with it.

So does this locally lower the temperature of the water in the river? And if so, how does that affect the ecology of the river?


This is a good question, but it's a bit like asking if wind turbines reduce the power of gusts of wind. The answer is, a fractional amount.

My house is fitted with air source heat pumps and soon we may have a ground source heat pump at another property. They are good value for money and help reduce bills.

I do not understand why people are so quick to have a go at more efficient or renewable energy. Even if solar panels save 10% a year they may be worth it. If everyone did it we may be able to close a coal fired power station and save all that pollution. No matter what your views on global warming, reducing pollution shouldn't be a difficult thing for anyone to support.
[quote][p][bold]bonobo[/bold] wrote: Bloody green zealots with their bloody hippy , impractical ideas !! Has anyone actually checked out what the cheapest electric tariff is in the country and how that energy is produced ? Research it and open your eyes and stop dragging your heels[/p][/quote]Ground source heat pumps are widely used and are not really part of "renewable energy". They require lots of electricity to make them work. However, this energy is generally used to pump water, rather than make heat, which makes it more efficient than directly heating homes with it. [quote]So does this locally lower the temperature of the water in the river? And if so, how does that affect the ecology of the river?[/quote] This is a good question, but it's a bit like asking if wind turbines reduce the power of gusts of wind. The answer is, a fractional amount. My house is fitted with air source heat pumps and soon we may have a ground source heat pump at another property. They are good value for money and help reduce bills. I do not understand why people are so quick to have a go at more efficient or renewable energy. Even if solar panels save 10% a year they may be worth it. If everyone did it we may be able to close a coal fired power station and save all that pollution. No matter what your views on global warming, reducing pollution shouldn't be a difficult thing for anyone to support. BethFoxhunter96
  • Score: 2

1:56pm Wed 13 Aug 14

bonobo says...

Bethfoxhunter ...my first comment was a poor attempt at mocking people who mock environmentalists like myself :)
Bethfoxhunter ...my first comment was a poor attempt at mocking people who mock environmentalists like myself :) bonobo
  • Score: 4

4:33pm Wed 13 Aug 14

BethFoxhunter96 says...

bonobo wrote:
Bethfoxhunter ...my first comment was a poor attempt at mocking people who mock environmentalists like myself :)
:) Sorry my friend. I had just been arguing on another page so much have seen red... good comment indeed! To be honest it's not that different from some actual views on this website!!! Which is probably why I missed it heheehe Beth x
[quote][p][bold]bonobo[/bold] wrote: Bethfoxhunter ...my first comment was a poor attempt at mocking people who mock environmentalists like myself :)[/p][/quote]:) Sorry my friend. I had just been arguing on another page so much have seen red... good comment indeed! To be honest it's not that different from some actual views on this website!!! Which is probably why I missed it heheehe Beth x BethFoxhunter96
  • Score: 4

5:19pm Wed 13 Aug 14

bonobo says...

BethFoxhunter96 wrote:
bonobo wrote:
Bethfoxhunter ...my first comment was a poor attempt at mocking people who mock environmentalists like myself :)
:) Sorry my friend. I had just been arguing on another page so much have seen red... good comment indeed! To be honest it's not that different from some actual views on this website!!! Which is probably why I missed it heheehe Beth x
Don't worry ...text Irony is hard as its so close to the norm :) x
[quote][p][bold]BethFoxhunter96[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bonobo[/bold] wrote: Bethfoxhunter ...my first comment was a poor attempt at mocking people who mock environmentalists like myself :)[/p][/quote]:) Sorry my friend. I had just been arguing on another page so much have seen red... good comment indeed! To be honest it's not that different from some actual views on this website!!! Which is probably why I missed it heheehe Beth x[/p][/quote]Don't worry ...text Irony is hard as its so close to the norm :) x bonobo
  • Score: 2

3:25pm Mon 1 Sep 14

greenmonkey says...

smudge2 wrote:
gwen4me wrote:
Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.
Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .
Is there any evidence to back this "all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly " As someone with them fitted I would expect to break even within about 12 years on a 25 year life. As the Feed in tariff goes with the property anyone who got them fitted in the first year would be mad to remove them as the property enjoys a higher payment rate than more recently installed panels, reflecting the lower costs of the panels.
[quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gwen4me[/bold] wrote: Nuclear is good, but the world uranium resource isn't infinite. We could use sustainable sources like rivers and estuaries to provide a chunk of power and save more by adapting our homes and transport.[/p][/quote]Renewable energy doesn't work properly or produce enough power for the massive cost. Involved..is just plain facts and all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly .[/p][/quote]Is there any evidence to back this "all these unsightly solar panel on roofs are a complete waste of time in the UK..Most people who have had them fitted never get their money back and when houses are sold a lot of people take them down as the look so unsightly " As someone with them fitted I would expect to break even within about 12 years on a 25 year life. As the Feed in tariff goes with the property anyone who got them fitted in the first year would be mad to remove them as the property enjoys a higher payment rate than more recently installed panels, reflecting the lower costs of the panels. greenmonkey
  • Score: 0

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