1,500 York street-lights to be replaced

1,500 York street-lights to be replaced

1,500 York street-lights to be replaced

Published in News by

New LED street lights will be shining in York this winter - to cut crime, save hard-pressed charge payers money, and improve views of the night sky.

But they may not always operate at full power because they will be turned down in off-peak periods by council bosses - who say no one will be able to tell the difference.

More than 1,500 lamps will be replaced in seven months to provide clearer "white light" by January in Rawcliffe, Clifton, Huntington, New Earswick, Copmanthorpe, Bishopthorpe and Micklegate.

The areas currently have the highest number of the sodium lights, introduced in the 1980s because the low wattage was cheap - but many found the orange glow depressing.

Police monitoring CCTV cameras also dislike sodium - because it mixes up colours in the dark and makes it harder for witnesses to provide accurate descriptions.

The new LEDS will be reduced by 50 to 60 per cent on streets between midnight and 6am when there is less traffic.

York Council has already experimented with the first LED lights, installed in January on Hamilton Way, Collingwood Avenue, Stewart Road and Amberley Street in Holgate.

They say when the lights were reduced by up to 60 per cent no one noticed.

Cllr David Levene, Cabinet Member for Transport, said: “LED lighting is cheaper, better for the environment, and gives a superior quality of illumination which will help residents feel safer.”

York Police Commander Supt Phil Cain said: “The benefits of the new lighting with regards to improved CCTV images is something that will aid criminal investigations in the city.”

The new street lights cost £200 each, but are expected to save £20 a year - or £30,000 in total.

Reduced maintenance costs and carbon emissions will also mean a £1,200 annual saving.

Cllr Dave Merrett, Cabinet Member for Environmental Services, said: “LED lights reduce light pollution, increase the number of stars visible at night and reduce the effects of unnatural lighting .

"They also halve the amount of energy usage per light by 50 per cent while maintaining current lighting level standards, and they save money."

The York Environment Forum, said: “This is a positive move towards reducing the city’s carbon emissions and it makes sound economic sense."

Comments (30)

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12:20pm Wed 9 Jul 14

X5019c says...

In times of austerity should we really be replacing street lamps or should be be more concerned of the care of our elderly and basic services that have been hit hard like rubbish collection?
The cost of £200 each is most likely the basic unit cost, once you factor in the cost of ripping up the old ones and disposing of them and then installing the new ones is suspect that you would not get much change out of £800-1000. Why is it that the Press print out press releases from the Council as if they are gospel and never practice any due diligence?
In times of austerity should we really be replacing street lamps or should be be more concerned of the care of our elderly and basic services that have been hit hard like rubbish collection? The cost of £200 each is most likely the basic unit cost, once you factor in the cost of ripping up the old ones and disposing of them and then installing the new ones is suspect that you would not get much change out of £800-1000. Why is it that the Press print out press releases from the Council as if they are gospel and never practice any due diligence? X5019c
  • Score: -9

12:28pm Wed 9 Jul 14

lezyork1966 says...

I dont think changing from sodium to led will save 50% electricity for the same light.
and I hate to say this after years of being an electronics hobbyist, but LED is not anywhere near as reliable as sodium.
better light, yes for colour vision, less light pollution? well as most of that is caused by light reflecting back off the road surface not really...
turning them down to 50% at night will help but why not just turn off half the old ones and it costs nothing to change!
I dont think changing from sodium to led will save 50% electricity for the same light. and I hate to say this after years of being an electronics hobbyist, but LED is not anywhere near as reliable as sodium. better light, yes for colour vision, less light pollution? well as most of that is caused by light reflecting back off the road surface not really... turning them down to 50% at night will help but why not just turn off half the old ones and it costs nothing to change! lezyork1966
  • Score: -9

12:29pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Oaklands Resident says...

But according to the Council web site they haven't issued a media release?

There is also no record of any consultation having been undertaken with residents and no indication of who took this decision and when?

While dimming street lights in main streets - which enjoy illumination from shop window displays which have been left on all night - may have little effect, I have serous concerns about the implications for back alleys, snickets etc.

The Police comments add to my concern.

Not fully thought through?
But according to the Council web site they haven't issued a media release? There is also no record of any consultation having been undertaken with residents and no indication of who took this decision and when? While dimming street lights in main streets - which enjoy illumination from shop window displays which have been left on all night - may have little effect, I have serous concerns about the implications for back alleys, snickets etc. The Police comments add to my concern. Not fully thought through? Oaklands Resident
  • Score: -10

12:40pm Wed 9 Jul 14

anistasia says...

We got them 8-10 months ago in new earswick and you can see the difference a lot dimmer than the old ones
We got them 8-10 months ago in new earswick and you can see the difference a lot dimmer than the old ones anistasia
  • Score: -11

12:42pm Wed 9 Jul 14

BL2 says...

If no one noticed them at reduced levels why run them at full power at all?
If no one noticed them at reduced levels why run them at full power at all? BL2
  • Score: -10

12:43pm Wed 9 Jul 14

anistasia says...

We got them 8-10 months ago in new earswick and you can see the difference a lot dimmer than the old ones.
We got them 8-10 months ago in new earswick and you can see the difference a lot dimmer than the old ones. anistasia
  • Score: -10

12:47pm Wed 9 Jul 14

eeoodares says...

BL2 wrote:
If no one noticed them at reduced levels why run them at full power at all?
You have hit the nail on the head.

I doubt very much if you can get an LED street light fitted for £200. I am thinking that is a made-up figure.
[quote][p][bold]BL2[/bold] wrote: If no one noticed them at reduced levels why run them at full power at all?[/p][/quote]You have hit the nail on the head. I doubt very much if you can get an LED street light fitted for £200. I am thinking that is a made-up figure. eeoodares
  • Score: -15

12:48pm Wed 9 Jul 14

again says...

Brilliant idea!

LED is the future.

Fact: Britain was the last of the great industrial economies to be electrified behind Germany, the USA and France among others.

We have some excellent inventors and scientists; we also have a first class record at failing to make use of their work. The comments here demonstrate why.
Brilliant idea! LED is the future. Fact: Britain was the last of the great industrial economies to be electrified behind Germany, the USA and France among others. We have some excellent inventors and scientists; we also have a first class record at failing to make use of their work. The comments here demonstrate why. again
  • Score: 18

12:50pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Buzzz Light-year says...

The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.
The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant. Buzzz Light-year
  • Score: 2

12:59pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Dave Ruddock says...

save hard-pressed charge payers money (No Idea)
Cabinet Member for Transport, said: “LED lighting is cheaper, better for the environment, and gives a superior quality of illumination which will help residents feel safer.” (the White light guardian)
Reduced maintenance costs and carbon emissions will also mean a £1,200 annual saving. (What Carbon Emissions)
and also York and all other cities are suffering depression for the last 30-40 years due to Orange lighting, and i thought is was recession.
Ho well where all wrong lol
save hard-pressed charge payers money (No Idea) Cabinet Member for Transport, said: “LED lighting is cheaper, better for the environment, and gives a superior quality of illumination which will help residents feel safer.” (the White light guardian) Reduced maintenance costs and carbon emissions will also mean a £1,200 annual saving. (What Carbon Emissions) and also York and all other cities are suffering depression for the last 30-40 years due to Orange lighting, and i thought is was recession. Ho well where all wrong lol Dave Ruddock
  • Score: -6

1:45pm Wed 9 Jul 14

the original Homer says...

If the £1200 annual saving is for the entire scheme than it's so low that it isn't even worth reporting.

If it's £1200 per light then it's a great saving, but at the same time it's scandalous that the old lights were costing so much to maintain.

I suspect the £1200 is just a made up figure, based on a percentage of the total annual spend on maintenance. As such it would be a saving that would never actually happen (how do you sell a quarter of a lorry, make 1% of a manager redundant, close 2% of a depot etc?).
If the £1200 annual saving is for the entire scheme than it's so low that it isn't even worth reporting. If it's £1200 per light then it's a great saving, but at the same time it's scandalous that the old lights were costing so much to maintain. I suspect the £1200 is just a made up figure, based on a percentage of the total annual spend on maintenance. As such it would be a saving that would never actually happen (how do you sell a quarter of a lorry, make 1% of a manager redundant, close 2% of a depot etc?). the original Homer
  • Score: -12

2:05pm Wed 9 Jul 14

the original Homer says...

LEDs are far more efficient, hence cheaper to run. They can also be incredibly reliable, but you really do get what you pay for. I've got LEDs with thousands of hours use behind them, but I had some which failed within days. I hope the Council are buying the good ones.

I also hope that they will set (and publish) a policy for fixing them. The picture shows a lamp unit with 32 separate LEDs (probably actually 32 clusters of many smaller LEDs). There is no sense in going out to fix a light every time one of those 32 fails, so the council need to set a threshold of what number of failures constitutes a need of a fix. It might be better if they planned to just do a round of fixing once a year and to not worry about individual failures unless there was a real safety issue.

On another level, "not worrying about individual failures" is probably the one thing this council is actually good at.
LEDs are far more efficient, hence cheaper to run. They can also be incredibly reliable, but you really do get what you pay for. I've got LEDs with thousands of hours use behind them, but I had some which failed within days. I hope the Council are buying the good ones. I also hope that they will set (and publish) a policy for fixing them. The picture shows a lamp unit with 32 separate LEDs (probably actually 32 clusters of many smaller LEDs). There is no sense in going out to fix a light every time one of those 32 fails, so the council need to set a threshold of what number of failures constitutes a need of a fix. It might be better if they planned to just do a round of fixing once a year and to not worry about individual failures unless there was a real safety issue. On another level, "not worrying about individual failures" is probably the one thing this council is actually good at. the original Homer
  • Score: -10

2:05pm Wed 9 Jul 14

maybejustmaybe says...

the original Homer wrote:
If the £1200 annual saving is for the entire scheme than it's so low that it isn't even worth reporting.

If it's £1200 per light then it's a great saving, but at the same time it's scandalous that the old lights were costing so much to maintain.

I suspect the £1200 is just a made up figure, based on a percentage of the total annual spend on maintenance. As such it would be a saving that would never actually happen (how do you sell a quarter of a lorry, make 1% of a manager redundant, close 2% of a depot etc?).
£1200 annual saving on maintenance costs per light on these 1500 alone would be £2million a year. Can I have the contract?
[quote][p][bold]the original Homer[/bold] wrote: If the £1200 annual saving is for the entire scheme than it's so low that it isn't even worth reporting. If it's £1200 per light then it's a great saving, but at the same time it's scandalous that the old lights were costing so much to maintain. I suspect the £1200 is just a made up figure, based on a percentage of the total annual spend on maintenance. As such it would be a saving that would never actually happen (how do you sell a quarter of a lorry, make 1% of a manager redundant, close 2% of a depot etc?).[/p][/quote]£1200 annual saving on maintenance costs per light on these 1500 alone would be £2million a year. Can I have the contract? maybejustmaybe
  • Score: 1

2:35pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Badgers Drift says...

Questions:

1.The council say the new lights cost £200/each, but, does this include installation? if not, how much will that cost?

2. Why don't they replace the lights as and when the old ones have stopped working?

3. Where is the £300,000 (1,500 @ £200/ea) plus installation (if not included) coming from? Is this included in thisyear's budget?

4. Who made the decision, and when?

It's all very well spending this money on energy-saving, environmentally-frie
ndly equipment, but, if it means some other more deserving services suffer, then we should know about it, and have a right to question/criticise etc.

We need more transparency and honesty from this council, who time and time again arefound wanting...!!!
Questions: 1.The council say the new lights cost £200/each, but, does this include installation? if not, how much will that cost? 2. Why don't they replace the lights as and when the old ones have stopped working? 3. Where is the £300,000 (1,500 @ £200/ea) plus installation (if not included) coming from? Is this included in thisyear's budget? 4. Who made the decision, and when? It's all very well spending this money on energy-saving, environmentally-frie ndly equipment, but, if it means some other more deserving services suffer, then we should know about it, and have a right to question/criticise etc. We need more transparency and honesty from this council, who time and time again arefound wanting...!!! Badgers Drift
  • Score: -13

2:44pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Badgers Drift says...

again wrote:
Brilliant idea! LED is the future. Fact: Britain was the last of the great industrial economies to be electrified behind Germany, the USA and France among others. We have some excellent inventors and scientists; we also have a first class record at failing to make use of their work. The comments here demonstrate why.
The council will have us believe that they are good at brilliant ideas, but, the problem is they don't provide the full facts/information.

Until they provide fully detailed (evidence-based) cost/benefit analysis of their expenditure/ideas, I wouldn't believe what they say, because, the deal in spin and half-truths. Even when found out, they try tolie and cover up the truth.

The comments on here are entirely appropriate.
[quote][p][bold]again[/bold] wrote: Brilliant idea! LED is the future. Fact: Britain was the last of the great industrial economies to be electrified behind Germany, the USA and France among others. We have some excellent inventors and scientists; we also have a first class record at failing to make use of their work. The comments here demonstrate why.[/p][/quote]The council will have us believe that they are good at brilliant ideas, but, the problem is they don't provide the full facts/information. Until they provide fully detailed (evidence-based) cost/benefit analysis of their expenditure/ideas, I wouldn't believe what they say, because, the deal in spin and half-truths. Even when found out, they try tolie and cover up the truth. The comments on here are entirely appropriate. Badgers Drift
  • Score: -10

5:09pm Wed 9 Jul 14

notpedallingpaul says...

Buzzz Light-year wrote:
The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.
Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses!
[quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.[/p][/quote]Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses! notpedallingpaul
  • Score: -11

5:47pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Jonault says...

I have seen an article stating that the amount of blue light in LED lamps can interfere with sleep patterns and melatonin levels. It can have an adverse effect on wild life. Has enough research been conducted into these effects to allow them to be introduced wholesale?
I have seen an article stating that the amount of blue light in LED lamps can interfere with sleep patterns and melatonin levels. It can have an adverse effect on wild life. Has enough research been conducted into these effects to allow them to be introduced wholesale? Jonault
  • Score: -10

6:16pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Buzzz Light-year says...

notpedallingpaul wrote:
Buzzz Light-year wrote:
The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.
Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses!
Most stupid reply ever
[quote][p][bold]notpedallingpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.[/p][/quote]Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses![/p][/quote]Most stupid reply ever Buzzz Light-year
  • Score: 2

6:53pm Wed 9 Jul 14

gmsgop says...

1. Was there any consultation? If not why not?

2. Why were these places chosen?

3. Have I missed the committee/cabinet/co
uncillor or chief officer report, cost benefit analysis and decision? Is there a record of who made the decision when? Who has the powers to make this decision? Was it in June forward plan or any plan? Was the decision made legally - if so it should be somewhere where we can see it.....

4. What is the total budget? Has the contract been tendered? When? Thx badgers drift - where can citizens see it programmed? Is this more capital borrowing if so from where or has Ian Floyd found an extra cache or cash?

5. Last year £2million was spent on getting the latest street lights as I recall- - are all those LED etc? Do we dim these? If not why did City of York buy them?

6. I wrote to Dave Merritt with these questions and some more a few days ago - but to date these particular questions have not been answered.

7. Regarding the press release- interesting I haven't seen one but quite a few folks on the environment forum were asked by our chair for comments as CYC had asked for comments a few days ago - it seems the council did not send background documents, explanations or anything else to support this decision.

As usual seems the transparency and engagement is the usual York Council style - if we are lucky we are told of dictats agreed behind closed doors - please tell me I'm wrong....

Gwen Swinburn
1. Was there any consultation? If not why not? 2. Why were these places chosen? 3. Have I missed the committee/cabinet/co uncillor or chief officer report, cost benefit analysis and decision? Is there a record of who made the decision when? Who has the powers to make this decision? Was it in June forward plan or any plan? Was the decision made legally - if so it should be somewhere where we can see it..... 4. What is the total budget? Has the contract been tendered? When? Thx badgers drift - where can citizens see it programmed? Is this more capital borrowing if so from where or has Ian Floyd found an extra cache or cash? 5. Last year £2million was spent on getting the latest street lights as I recall- - are all those LED etc? Do we dim these? If not why did City of York buy them? 6. I wrote to Dave Merritt with these questions and some more a few days ago - but to date these particular questions have not been answered. 7. Regarding the press release- interesting I haven't seen one but quite a few folks on the environment forum were asked by our chair for comments as CYC had asked for comments a few days ago - it seems the council did not send background documents, explanations or anything else to support this decision. As usual seems the transparency and engagement is the usual York Council style - if we are lucky we are told of dictats agreed behind closed doors - please tell me I'm wrong.... Gwen Swinburn gmsgop
  • Score: -17

6:53pm Wed 9 Jul 14

gmsgop says...

1. Was there any consultation? If not why not?

2. Why were these places chosen?

3. Have I missed the committee/cabinet/co
uncillor or chief officer report, cost benefit analysis and decision? Is there a record of who made the decision when? Who has the powers to make this decision? Was it in June forward plan or any plan? Was the decision made legally - if so it should be somewhere where we can see it.....

4. What is the total budget? Has the contract been tendered? When? Thx badgers drift - where can citizens see it programmed? Is this more capital borrowing if so from where or has Ian Floyd found an extra cache or cash?

5. Last year £2million was spent on getting the latest street lights as I recall- - are all those LED etc? Do we dim these? If not why did City of York buy them?

6. I wrote to Dave Merritt with these questions and some more a few days ago - but to date these particular questions have not been answered.

7. Regarding the press release- interesting I haven't seen one but quite a few folks on the environment forum were asked by our chair for comments as CYC had asked for comments a few days ago - it seems the council did not send background documents, explanations or anything else to support this decision.

As usual seems the transparency and engagement is the usual York Council style - if we are lucky we are told of dictats agreed behind closed doors - please tell me I'm wrong....

Gwen Swinburn
1. Was there any consultation? If not why not? 2. Why were these places chosen? 3. Have I missed the committee/cabinet/co uncillor or chief officer report, cost benefit analysis and decision? Is there a record of who made the decision when? Who has the powers to make this decision? Was it in June forward plan or any plan? Was the decision made legally - if so it should be somewhere where we can see it..... 4. What is the total budget? Has the contract been tendered? When? Thx badgers drift - where can citizens see it programmed? Is this more capital borrowing if so from where or has Ian Floyd found an extra cache or cash? 5. Last year £2million was spent on getting the latest street lights as I recall- - are all those LED etc? Do we dim these? If not why did City of York buy them? 6. I wrote to Dave Merritt with these questions and some more a few days ago - but to date these particular questions have not been answered. 7. Regarding the press release- interesting I haven't seen one but quite a few folks on the environment forum were asked by our chair for comments as CYC had asked for comments a few days ago - it seems the council did not send background documents, explanations or anything else to support this decision. As usual seems the transparency and engagement is the usual York Council style - if we are lucky we are told of dictats agreed behind closed doors - please tell me I'm wrong.... Gwen Swinburn gmsgop
  • Score: -18

8:12pm Wed 9 Jul 14

PKH says...

the original Homer wrote:
LEDs are far more efficient, hence cheaper to run. They can also be incredibly reliable, but you really do get what you pay for. I've got LEDs with thousands of hours use behind them, but I had some which failed within days. I hope the Council are buying the good ones.

I also hope that they will set (and publish) a policy for fixing them. The picture shows a lamp unit with 32 separate LEDs (probably actually 32 clusters of many smaller LEDs). There is no sense in going out to fix a light every time one of those 32 fails, so the council need to set a threshold of what number of failures constitutes a need of a fix. It might be better if they planned to just do a round of fixing once a year and to not worry about individual failures unless there was a real safety issue.

On another level, "not worrying about individual failures" is probably the one thing this council is actually good at.
The LED lights fitted in my mothers kitchen were the most unreliable lights I have ever come across 50% of them failed in under a year.
[quote][p][bold]the original Homer[/bold] wrote: LEDs are far more efficient, hence cheaper to run. They can also be incredibly reliable, but you really do get what you pay for. I've got LEDs with thousands of hours use behind them, but I had some which failed within days. I hope the Council are buying the good ones. I also hope that they will set (and publish) a policy for fixing them. The picture shows a lamp unit with 32 separate LEDs (probably actually 32 clusters of many smaller LEDs). There is no sense in going out to fix a light every time one of those 32 fails, so the council need to set a threshold of what number of failures constitutes a need of a fix. It might be better if they planned to just do a round of fixing once a year and to not worry about individual failures unless there was a real safety issue. On another level, "not worrying about individual failures" is probably the one thing this council is actually good at.[/p][/quote]The LED lights fitted in my mothers kitchen were the most unreliable lights I have ever come across 50% of them failed in under a year. PKH
  • Score: -6

8:38pm Wed 9 Jul 14

simon34 says...

Jonault wrote:
I have seen an article stating that the amount of blue light in LED lamps can interfere with sleep patterns and melatonin levels. It can have an adverse effect on wild life. Has enough research been conducted into these effects to allow them to be introduced wholesale?
Answer: No. When Cllr Levene says they are "better for the environment" he is clearly repeating all the PR-spin and sound bytes without having a proper understanding of the subject matter.

LEDs come in different CCTs. The energy efficient ones are more environmentally damaging because they have to produce a lot of blue light to compete with sodium.

Why don't these people do some proper due dilligence rather than believing what the snake oil (LED, in this case) salesmen tell them?
[quote][p][bold]Jonault[/bold] wrote: I have seen an article stating that the amount of blue light in LED lamps can interfere with sleep patterns and melatonin levels. It can have an adverse effect on wild life. Has enough research been conducted into these effects to allow them to be introduced wholesale?[/p][/quote]Answer: No. When Cllr Levene says they are "better for the environment" he is clearly repeating all the PR-spin and sound bytes without having a proper understanding of the subject matter. LEDs come in different CCTs. The energy efficient ones are more environmentally damaging because they have to produce a lot of blue light to compete with sodium. Why don't these people do some proper due dilligence rather than believing what the snake oil (LED, in this case) salesmen tell them? simon34
  • Score: -13

9:11pm Wed 9 Jul 14

MorkofYork says...

Are these the same as the white ones in Acomb ? They make it harder to see the paths.
Are these the same as the white ones in Acomb ? They make it harder to see the paths. MorkofYork
  • Score: -10

9:42pm Wed 9 Jul 14

york_chap says...

"Cllr Dave Merrett, Cabinet Member for Environmental Services, said.... they also halve the amount of energy usage per light by 50 per cent".

Well duh. A half is equal to 50%. I think I learnt that when I was about 7.

Good to see our councillors know their maths as well as any primary school aged child.
"Cllr Dave Merrett, Cabinet Member for Environmental Services, said.... they also halve the amount of energy usage per light by 50 per cent". Well duh. A half is equal to 50%. I think I learnt that when I was about 7. Good to see our councillors know their maths as well as any primary school aged child. york_chap
  • Score: -13

3:40am Thu 10 Jul 14

Magicman! says...

Just one or two points to consider....

If anybody from the council reads this, I suggest buying products from a reputable brand such as Philips; purchasing lights from some random unknown brand may sound cheaper at first due to lower "off the shelf" prices, but the Led's, or more importantly, the PCB drivers which power the LED's will be of an inferior quality - and as such would have a much higher failure rate, leading to lanterns failing within their first 5 years... as the economic payback of these lights is worked out over an expected 20-25 year lifetime, having a load of them failing nowhere near that timescale would wreck any cost savings. The LED lights on Water End are made by a random company in West Yorkshire, and three of the lights have yet to shine a single lumen since they were installed over 18 months ago.

To reduce light pollution will require specifying lights at a sensible power output. Some councils *COUGHCOUGHleedsCOUG
HCOUGH* have spent millions of pounds installing lights that are at least 1 but normally 2 or 3 stages too bright for the class of installation they are (whether this be on a 6m pole in a back alley or on a 12m pole on the ring road) - the result of this is that 30-40% of the light emitted from these "dark sky friendly" lanterns is reflected straight off the road surface and into the sky, meaning the area concerned now has worse light pollution than before.

I would also like to see "warm white" LED lights used. Standard LED lights produce light at too high a 'colour temperature', which appears to be very blue-based - this can be perceived as cold and clinical.

-----

As for dimming lights, it is true that being able to detect a dimmed light is quite tricky. I have such a light at home myself, the light sensor on top is a special one that dims the light output to 75% of full brightness from midnight until dawn - the only way to tell it has dimmed is to take a photo of it lit at 10pm (when it's dark by that time obviously), and then again at 2am in the exact same position, and then compare the photos - the human eye can't tell the difference; and this is helped because the lights don't suddenly go from full brightness to their dimmed level in 1 second or less - instead the output is gradually dimmed over a period of about an hour.
... it' also worth noting that most lanterns installed after 2011 have the equipment inside which means they are "dimming ready" so to speak. The light source in those may not be LED, but can still be dimmed.

Savings of these LED lights versus the yellow sodium lights will vary from street to street, as most of the savings vary on the equipment which controls the sodium lamp itself. Many streets in Huntington still have old 'chunky' concrete lamp posts in which the bottom part holds the necessary equipment (such as on New Lane) - this equipment can date back to the 1970's and is quite 'lossy', so a lamp which might be rated as using 55 Watts of power is in actual fact consuming at least 70 Watts of power and in some cases even up to over 100 Watts of power.
Just one or two points to consider.... If anybody from the council reads this, I suggest buying products from a reputable brand such as Philips; purchasing lights from some random unknown brand may sound cheaper at first due to lower "off the shelf" prices, but the Led's, or more importantly, the PCB drivers which power the LED's will be of an inferior quality - and as such would have a much higher failure rate, leading to lanterns failing within their first 5 years... as the economic payback of these lights is worked out over an expected 20-25 year lifetime, having a load of them failing nowhere near that timescale would wreck any cost savings. The LED lights on Water End are made by a random company in West Yorkshire, and three of the lights have yet to shine a single lumen since they were installed over 18 months ago. To reduce light pollution will require specifying lights at a sensible power output. Some councils *COUGHCOUGHleedsCOUG HCOUGH* have spent millions of pounds installing lights that are at least 1 but normally 2 or 3 stages too bright for the class of installation they are (whether this be on a 6m pole in a back alley or on a 12m pole on the ring road) - the result of this is that 30-40% of the light emitted from these "dark sky friendly" lanterns is reflected straight off the road surface and into the sky, meaning the area concerned now has worse light pollution than before. I would also like to see "warm white" LED lights used. Standard LED lights produce light at too high a 'colour temperature', which appears to be very blue-based - this can be perceived as cold and clinical. ----- As for dimming lights, it is true that being able to detect a dimmed light is quite tricky. I have such a light at home myself, the light sensor on top is a special one that dims the light output to 75% of full brightness from midnight until dawn - the only way to tell it has dimmed is to take a photo of it lit at 10pm (when it's dark by that time obviously), and then again at 2am in the exact same position, and then compare the photos - the human eye can't tell the difference; and this is helped because the lights don't suddenly go from full brightness to their dimmed level in 1 second or less - instead the output is gradually dimmed over a period of about an hour. ... it' also worth noting that most lanterns installed after 2011 have the equipment inside which means they are "dimming ready" so to speak. The light source in those may not be LED, but can still be dimmed. Savings of these LED lights versus the yellow sodium lights will vary from street to street, as most of the savings vary on the equipment which controls the sodium lamp itself. Many streets in Huntington still have old 'chunky' concrete lamp posts in which the bottom part holds the necessary equipment (such as on New Lane) - this equipment can date back to the 1970's and is quite 'lossy', so a lamp which might be rated as using 55 Watts of power is in actual fact consuming at least 70 Watts of power and in some cases even up to over 100 Watts of power. Magicman!
  • Score: 11

8:09am Thu 10 Jul 14

pedalling paul says...

Buzzz Light-year wrote:
notpedallingpaul wrote:
Buzzz Light-year wrote:
The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.
Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses!
Most stupid reply ever
I've used LED lights on my bike for years and found them to be very energy friendly and long lasting.......
[quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]notpedallingpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.[/p][/quote]Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses![/p][/quote]Most stupid reply ever[/p][/quote]I've used LED lights on my bike for years and found them to be very energy friendly and long lasting....... pedalling paul
  • Score: -6

9:11am Thu 10 Jul 14

AGuyFromStrensall says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Buzzz Light-year wrote:
notpedallingpaul wrote:
Buzzz Light-year wrote:
The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.
Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses!
Most stupid reply ever
I've used LED lights on my bike for years and found them to be very energy friendly and long lasting.......
Paul managing to shoehorn a bike comment into a completely unrelated story, who would have thunk it...
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]notpedallingpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.[/p][/quote]Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses![/p][/quote]Most stupid reply ever[/p][/quote]I've used LED lights on my bike for years and found them to be very energy friendly and long lasting.......[/p][/quote]Paul managing to shoehorn a bike comment into a completely unrelated story, who would have thunk it... AGuyFromStrensall
  • Score: 6

4:24pm Thu 10 Jul 14

York2000 says...

What the hell has happened to this newspaper.
What the hell has happened to this newspaper. York2000
  • Score: 31

10:16pm Thu 10 Jul 14

pedalling paul says...

AGuyFromStrensall wrote:
pedalling paul wrote:
Buzzz Light-year wrote:
notpedallingpaul wrote:
Buzzz Light-year wrote:
The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.
Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses!
Most stupid reply ever
I've used LED lights on my bike for years and found them to be very energy friendly and long lasting.......
Paul managing to shoehorn a bike comment into a completely unrelated story, who would have thunk it...
Blue touch paper duly lit...........!
[quote][p][bold]AGuyFromStrensall[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]notpedallingpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Buzzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: The LED lights give off a cold light, it's not pleasant.[/p][/quote]Don't stand underneath one then, or put on dark glasses![/p][/quote]Most stupid reply ever[/p][/quote]I've used LED lights on my bike for years and found them to be very energy friendly and long lasting.......[/p][/quote]Paul managing to shoehorn a bike comment into a completely unrelated story, who would have thunk it...[/p][/quote]Blue touch paper duly lit...........! pedalling paul
  • Score: -6

10:27pm Thu 10 Jul 14

deckhanddave says...

Am I the only person to have noticed that these horrible lights create darker ,deeper shadows? I was driving in Acomb and thought somehow it was my car headlights that were the problem, then I found out the street lights had been changed. They have a weak bluish tinged light that's washed out creating these deeper shadows, especially during the darker nights. I'm glad my car hasn't got a tinted windscreen.
Am I the only person to have noticed that these horrible lights create darker ,deeper shadows? I was driving in Acomb and thought somehow it was my car headlights that were the problem, then I found out the street lights had been changed. They have a weak bluish tinged light that's washed out creating these deeper shadows, especially during the darker nights. I'm glad my car hasn't got a tinted windscreen. deckhanddave
  • Score: -9
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