York ‘is affordable housing blackspot’ in Yorkshire and Humber - charity claims

York ‘is affordable housing blackspot’

York ‘is affordable housing blackspot’

Published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by

YORK is the least affordable place in Yorkshire and the Humber for young families trying to get a foot on the housing ladder.

Research by housing charity Shelter shows that just one percent of houses for sale in York would be within the reach of a a family trying to buy their first home - the lowest figure in the Yorkshire and Humber region.

The figures were gathered when the charity surveyed the asking prices of homes for sale on one day, and compared them to average wages, deposits and mortgages for first time buyers.

In York, only eight out of 817 homes for sale would have been affordable for a working family - with one full time and one part time income - trying to buy their first home, in Harrogate 46 out of 1,345, and Scarborough 129 out of 1,104.

The situation was even worse for single people relying on only one average income to buy - just 0.9 percent of homes were affordable; while even childless couples with two incomes would find just 20 percent of homes for sale within their budget.

York’s council leader James Alexander has called the revelations clear proof of York’s housing crisis.

He said: “This is why many York families are being priced out of their own city. Since Labour won control of the council our actions have brought forward a dramatic increase in the number of planning consents and development on brownfield sites has started, but we still need an increase in land supply for homes and employment to stop a generation being lost to ‘generation rent’.

“Every York hardworking family should be able to live in a decent home they can afford and this shouldn’t be a privilege of the few.”

Comments (20)

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8:19am Thu 26 Jun 14

andrew flower says...

Yet another glorious failure for Alexander
Yet another glorious failure for Alexander andrew flower
  • Score: 15

8:30am Thu 26 Jun 14

nearlyman says...

What is wrong with renting ? It is the norm in many countries. Home ownership is almost an uniquely British obsession. You cannot buck the market and Labour has done more damage to peoples prospects with its ideological meddling in these matters. .....and some among their own ranks even buy up housing stock to profit themselves from the situation......'you do as we say and we will do what most enriches us'....the essence of socialism.
What is wrong with renting ? It is the norm in many countries. Home ownership is almost an uniquely British obsession. You cannot buck the market and Labour has done more damage to peoples prospects with its ideological meddling in these matters. .....and some among their own ranks even buy up housing stock to profit themselves from the situation......'you do as we say and we will do what most enriches us'....the essence of socialism. nearlyman
  • Score: 16

8:39am Thu 26 Jun 14

julia brica says...

"Our actions have brought forward a ---DRAMATIC-- increase in the number of planning consents and development on brownfield sites have started "
Well ! I must have missed that one . Perhaps James would be so kind as to provide a full list for us all to marvel at.
"Our actions have brought forward a ---DRAMATIC-- increase in the number of planning consents and development on brownfield sites have started " Well ! I must have missed that one . Perhaps James would be so kind as to provide a full list for us all to marvel at. julia brica
  • Score: 18

8:45am Thu 26 Jun 14

eeoodares says...

House building all but stopped in York because of Labour's mismanagement.

Building has begun since Labour lost in Court regarding its punitive social housing policy. Yet he still claims it as a victory, I am not sure what goes on in that mans head. I used to think he was incompetent, he might actually be delusional.
House building all but stopped in York because of Labour's mismanagement. Building has begun since Labour lost in Court regarding its punitive social housing policy. Yet he still claims it as a victory, I am not sure what goes on in that mans head. I used to think he was incompetent, he might actually be delusional. eeoodares
  • Score: 16

8:51am Thu 26 Jun 14

Zetkin says...

Put this together with the recent revelations about the extent of low-paid part-time work in the city's economy and you can see what a struggle day-to-day life is for thousands of York citizens.

As Nearlyman says, there's nothing wrong with renting, except there's a crisis in that sector too. Someone working a twenty-hour week for the minimum wage cannot afford the rents being demanded by greedy buy-to-let landlords.

However they try to spin it, the council's efforts won't make much difference. Action is needed at national level, preferably through an immediate end to council house sales and a massive programme of building new council houses to replace those that have been privatised, coupled with the reintroduction of rent controls.

We can afford this easily if we ditch the three-party consensus that austerity is inevitable and desirable. The British economy, despite the weakness of the current alleged recovery, is in a far stronger condition than it was at the end of the second world war, when we managed to build hundreds of thousands of homes for people that needed them (not just "hardworking families" whatever the hell that means), providing thousands of building jobs in the process.
Put this together with the recent revelations about the extent of low-paid part-time work in the city's economy and you can see what a struggle day-to-day life is for thousands of York citizens. As Nearlyman says, there's nothing wrong with renting, except there's a crisis in that sector too. Someone working a twenty-hour week for the minimum wage cannot afford the rents being demanded by greedy buy-to-let landlords. However they try to spin it, the council's efforts won't make much difference. Action is needed at national level, preferably through an immediate end to council house sales and a massive programme of building new council houses to replace those that have been privatised, coupled with the reintroduction of rent controls. We can afford this easily if we ditch the three-party consensus that austerity is inevitable and desirable. The British economy, despite the weakness of the current alleged recovery, is in a far stronger condition than it was at the end of the second world war, when we managed to build hundreds of thousands of homes for people that needed them (not just "hardworking families" whatever the hell that means), providing thousands of building jobs in the process. Zetkin
  • Score: 23

9:10am Thu 26 Jun 14

CommonSense!! says...

Someone working 20 hours a week can't afford nice things? What a surprise.

How about getting out and doing a proper job and working proper hours?
Someone working 20 hours a week can't afford nice things? What a surprise. How about getting out and doing a proper job and working proper hours? CommonSense!!
  • Score: -20

10:04am Thu 26 Jun 14

andrew flower says...

CommonSense!! wrote:
Someone working 20 hours a week can't afford nice things? What a surprise.

How about getting out and doing a proper job and working proper hours?
In Alexander's kingdom such things do not exist.
[quote][p][bold]CommonSense!![/bold] wrote: Someone working 20 hours a week can't afford nice things? What a surprise. How about getting out and doing a proper job and working proper hours?[/p][/quote]In Alexander's kingdom such things do not exist. andrew flower
  • Score: 10

11:23am Thu 26 Jun 14

Archiebold the 1st says...

York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses.

I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job.

But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones.

No sympathy at all.
York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all. Archiebold the 1st
  • Score: -10

11:28am Thu 26 Jun 14

Blythespirit says...

CommonSense!! wrote:
Someone working 20 hours a week can't afford nice things? What a surprise.

How about getting out and doing a proper job and working proper hours?
Where have you been? There are plenty of young people out there struggling on zero hours contracts, not knowing from one week to the next what their hours are going to be. I know plenty of my children's friends who would absolutely love to have full time hours but just can't get the work. I bought my first house at the age of 21. I worked part time, my husband worked full time - not on massive money either - but a couple of decades ago this was enough to buy us a nice three bedroomed house in the city. I really do pity the plight of the younger generation today. No job security and house prices vastly out of reach. My own 21 year old works 40 hours a week (fortunately contracted hours) but still couldn't dream of owning a house of his own. On top of this lots of family houses have been converted into HMOs by greedy landlords wanting to milk every last drop out of the ex-social housing properties they have acquired. Added to this, not enough new housing has been built in this country for donkeys years - every new development being viciously opposed by selfish nimbies who already have their own little plot of green and pleasant land. Hence the current crisis...
[quote][p][bold]CommonSense!![/bold] wrote: Someone working 20 hours a week can't afford nice things? What a surprise. How about getting out and doing a proper job and working proper hours?[/p][/quote]Where have you been? There are plenty of young people out there struggling on zero hours contracts, not knowing from one week to the next what their hours are going to be. I know plenty of my children's friends who would absolutely love to have full time hours but just can't get the work. I bought my first house at the age of 21. I worked part time, my husband worked full time - not on massive money either - but a couple of decades ago this was enough to buy us a nice three bedroomed house in the city. I really do pity the plight of the younger generation today. No job security and house prices vastly out of reach. My own 21 year old works 40 hours a week (fortunately contracted hours) but still couldn't dream of owning a house of his own. On top of this lots of family houses have been converted into HMOs by greedy landlords wanting to milk every last drop out of the ex-social housing properties they have acquired. Added to this, not enough new housing has been built in this country for donkeys years - every new development being viciously opposed by selfish nimbies who already have their own little plot of green and pleasant land. Hence the current crisis... Blythespirit
  • Score: 24

11:32am Thu 26 Jun 14

bravo whisky says...

There is nothing at all wrong in renting a property, personally I see it as dead money, but in Germany renting is the norm. The problem in York is that York University has been given free rein to expand beyond its own abilities to accommodate all it students, hence the problems around Badger Hill estate and Hull road. Yes we know all Uni's take more students than it can accommodate such as Manchester but York is a village in comparison. Then we have a steady intake of non EU immigrants piling into York, helped by this labour council which heaps more pressure on the housing market. The British Sugar site has been dormant now since 2008 , all 100 acres of it, the Barbican swim pool site is still a unused mess, yes this labour council have worked wonders, is Alexander really in this world, I do not think even he knows the answer to that.
There is nothing at all wrong in renting a property, personally I see it as dead money, but in Germany renting is the norm. The problem in York is that York University has been given free rein to expand beyond its own abilities to accommodate all it students, hence the problems around Badger Hill estate and Hull road. Yes we know all Uni's take more students than it can accommodate such as Manchester but York is a village in comparison. Then we have a steady intake of non EU immigrants piling into York, helped by this labour council which heaps more pressure on the housing market. The British Sugar site has been dormant now since 2008 , all 100 acres of it, the Barbican swim pool site is still a unused mess, yes this labour council have worked wonders, is Alexander really in this world, I do not think even he knows the answer to that. bravo whisky
  • Score: 14

11:34am Thu 26 Jun 14

Blythespirit says...

Archiebold the 1st wrote:
York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses.

I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job.

But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones.

No sympathy at all.
Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.
[quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.[/p][/quote]Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do. Blythespirit
  • Score: 26

11:40am Thu 26 Jun 14

Archiebold the 1st says...

Blythespirit wrote:
Archiebold the 1st wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.
Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.
Actually no, it will be 2 years in december so the market is pretty much the same. I saved for around 5 years. If people can not manage their money that is their issue. You can always move outside of york? Studies show that people who earn the least spend the most. I will leave you with that thought.
[quote][p][bold]Blythespirit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.[/p][/quote]Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.[/p][/quote]Actually no, it will be 2 years in december so the market is pretty much the same. I saved for around 5 years. If people can not manage their money that is their issue. You can always move outside of york? Studies show that people who earn the least spend the most. I will leave you with that thought. Archiebold the 1st
  • Score: -15

12:06pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Blythespirit says...

Archiebold the 1st wrote:
Blythespirit wrote:
Archiebold the 1st wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.
Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.
Actually no, it will be 2 years in december so the market is pretty much the same. I saved for around 5 years. If people can not manage their money that is their issue. You can always move outside of york? Studies show that people who earn the least spend the most. I will leave you with that thought.
You are indeed right about the people who earn the least spending the most. Poorer people bear more of the tax burden (proportionately) than their better paid contemporaries and usually buy their fuel at higher rates through the use of prepayment meters. I work in housing and am reminded on a day to day basis of the hardships facing particularly working families on lower incomes. When you walk in other people's shoes you see first hand the inequality and hardship faced by the very people you claim to have no sympathy for. Believe me, people do move out of York - far away from their families and support networks - to find a roof over their heads. I don't know if you have children of your own, but when you see them struggling far harder than you had to, for far less reward, your feelings might change.
[quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Blythespirit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.[/p][/quote]Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.[/p][/quote]Actually no, it will be 2 years in december so the market is pretty much the same. I saved for around 5 years. If people can not manage their money that is their issue. You can always move outside of york? Studies show that people who earn the least spend the most. I will leave you with that thought.[/p][/quote]You are indeed right about the people who earn the least spending the most. Poorer people bear more of the tax burden (proportionately) than their better paid contemporaries and usually buy their fuel at higher rates through the use of prepayment meters. I work in housing and am reminded on a day to day basis of the hardships facing particularly working families on lower incomes. When you walk in other people's shoes you see first hand the inequality and hardship faced by the very people you claim to have no sympathy for. Believe me, people do move out of York - far away from their families and support networks - to find a roof over their heads. I don't know if you have children of your own, but when you see them struggling far harder than you had to, for far less reward, your feelings might change. Blythespirit
  • Score: 19

12:36pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Archiebold the 1st says...

Blythespirit wrote:
Archiebold the 1st wrote:
Blythespirit wrote:
Archiebold the 1st wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.
Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.
Actually no, it will be 2 years in december so the market is pretty much the same. I saved for around 5 years. If people can not manage their money that is their issue. You can always move outside of york? Studies show that people who earn the least spend the most. I will leave you with that thought.
You are indeed right about the people who earn the least spending the most. Poorer people bear more of the tax burden (proportionately) than their better paid contemporaries and usually buy their fuel at higher rates through the use of prepayment meters. I work in housing and am reminded on a day to day basis of the hardships facing particularly working families on lower incomes. When you walk in other people's shoes you see first hand the inequality and hardship faced by the very people you claim to have no sympathy for. Believe me, people do move out of York - far away from their families and support networks - to find a roof over their heads. I don't know if you have children of your own, but when you see them struggling far harder than you had to, for far less reward, your feelings might change.
They are also the biggest gambles and in general smoke and drink more (Generalisation not all do). I've worked on min wage and had a variety of jobs in my time. If people settle for that then I can't really criticize them. But to then turn around and say I can not afford to buy own house is a bit of an obvious statement. The same would apply for I can not afford to bring my child up right. It’s not really fair in having one if you can’t? No I don't have children. I'll have them when I am financially stable. I'd feel guilty having one if I couldn't offer them the best possible upbringing. Let’s also not forget why the market got so ridicules, people taking out massive loans with 5% deposits and not being able to pay.

The problem with this country is everyone wants things with minimal effort. There wouldn’t be a sudden surge in bright house sales and payday loans if we didn’t. We are getting worse then Americans for this. Families are now struggling as funding from the government has been cut. Which is a sharp wake up call for a lot of people. If you are struggling to afford to live or provide then you need to look at training up and progressing in life.

I know a lot of people won't agree with me and will call it harsh but this is one thing i fully beleive in. People have got away with doing nothing in this country for too long.
[quote][p][bold]Blythespirit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Blythespirit[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: York has always been expensive it is not a change? If you want to buy a house you have to get a good job. York is a central hub for many big businesses. I really have no sympathy for people who work and can not save for a house. I did my time saving up. If it is not affordable then there is always the possibility to train up and go for a higher paid job. But then again why bother? Just get a 5 bed council house in a nice area then when you have been in a while the council will sell it to you on the cheap. This only bumps house prices up. Supply and demand is a funny thing. The less houses available to the public in a development i.e non council, the higher they have to sell the available ones. No sympathy at all.[/p][/quote]Times have obviously changed since you nobly 'did your time saving up'. Rocketing house prices, energy bills and rising food costs have made saving up an impossibility for a vast number of young families. I too did my time saving up, but fortunately for my generation it was easier to do.[/p][/quote]Actually no, it will be 2 years in december so the market is pretty much the same. I saved for around 5 years. If people can not manage their money that is their issue. You can always move outside of york? Studies show that people who earn the least spend the most. I will leave you with that thought.[/p][/quote]You are indeed right about the people who earn the least spending the most. Poorer people bear more of the tax burden (proportionately) than their better paid contemporaries and usually buy their fuel at higher rates through the use of prepayment meters. I work in housing and am reminded on a day to day basis of the hardships facing particularly working families on lower incomes. When you walk in other people's shoes you see first hand the inequality and hardship faced by the very people you claim to have no sympathy for. Believe me, people do move out of York - far away from their families and support networks - to find a roof over their heads. I don't know if you have children of your own, but when you see them struggling far harder than you had to, for far less reward, your feelings might change.[/p][/quote]They are also the biggest gambles and in general smoke and drink more (Generalisation not all do). I've worked on min wage and had a variety of jobs in my time. If people settle for that then I can't really criticize them. But to then turn around and say I can not afford to buy own house is a bit of an obvious statement. The same would apply for I can not afford to bring my child up right. It’s not really fair in having one if you can’t? No I don't have children. I'll have them when I am financially stable. I'd feel guilty having one if I couldn't offer them the best possible upbringing. Let’s also not forget why the market got so ridicules, people taking out massive loans with 5% deposits and not being able to pay. The problem with this country is everyone wants things with minimal effort. There wouldn’t be a sudden surge in bright house sales and payday loans if we didn’t. We are getting worse then Americans for this. Families are now struggling as funding from the government has been cut. Which is a sharp wake up call for a lot of people. If you are struggling to afford to live or provide then you need to look at training up and progressing in life. I know a lot of people won't agree with me and will call it harsh but this is one thing i fully beleive in. People have got away with doing nothing in this country for too long. Archiebold the 1st
  • Score: 1

1:14pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Stafford_Staff says...

If you look at House Prices vs Wages since the 1970's, the gap has grown massively. It has never been tougher to get on the housing ladder. Your typical York terrace would have sold for around £45,000 in the Mid Nineties. Now sell for £140,000+, your looking at an annual price increase of £5000 a year, 5% a year, people have not been getting pay increases of 5% a year since the mid nineties. Unless we have large scale housing building in and around York, the young of York will suffer.
If you look at House Prices vs Wages since the 1970's, the gap has grown massively. It has never been tougher to get on the housing ladder. Your typical York terrace would have sold for around £45,000 in the Mid Nineties. Now sell for £140,000+, your looking at an annual price increase of £5000 a year, 5% a year, people have not been getting pay increases of 5% a year since the mid nineties. Unless we have large scale housing building in and around York, the young of York will suffer. Stafford_Staff
  • Score: 12

1:29pm Thu 26 Jun 14

RealMcoy says...

The answer is quite simple, if you cant afford to buy in York, buy somewhere you can afford and commute, i did it, then saved and built up equity in my house so after 5yrs or so we could afford to move back to York, its just how it is, its not going to change anytime soon so just get on with it, yes you might have to get out of bed a bit earlier to beat the traffic but at the end of the day you'll own a house and be on the ladder
The answer is quite simple, if you cant afford to buy in York, buy somewhere you can afford and commute, i did it, then saved and built up equity in my house so after 5yrs or so we could afford to move back to York, its just how it is, its not going to change anytime soon so just get on with it, yes you might have to get out of bed a bit earlier to beat the traffic but at the end of the day you'll own a house and be on the ladder RealMcoy
  • Score: 1

4:35pm Thu 26 Jun 14

bloodaxe says...

I thought that housebuilding slowed down to a trickle from 2008, after the financial crash, when the LibDems were still in office here. Housebuilding has actually increased in the last two years. Not nearly enough but at least buildings are going up. Plans to meet further demand seem doomed to the usual "anywhere but here" complaints. Moans that most of the new housing will be unaffordable overlook the point that as families move up the housing ladder they release smalller homes onto the market. However, the chief problems with housing are that wages are too low for many people nationally and that councils should be able to build good old (well-built and comfortable) council housing. For this they should be able to borrow, long term, as was formerly the case, setting the low cost borrowing against assets (housing). Whilever the banks and building societies are able to lend more than two and a half times salary, as used to be the case, then this problem will continue. Blaming local authorities (of any colour) won't do. Eric Pickles has more say in what goes on locally than any locally elected politician.
I thought that housebuilding slowed down to a trickle from 2008, after the financial crash, when the LibDems were still in office here. Housebuilding has actually increased in the last two years. Not nearly enough but at least buildings are going up. Plans to meet further demand seem doomed to the usual "anywhere but here" complaints. Moans that most of the new housing will be unaffordable overlook the point that as families move up the housing ladder they release smalller homes onto the market. However, the chief problems with housing are that wages are too low for many people nationally and that councils should be able to build good old (well-built and comfortable) council housing. For this they should be able to borrow, long term, as was formerly the case, setting the low cost borrowing against assets (housing). Whilever the banks and building societies are able to lend more than two and a half times salary, as used to be the case, then this problem will continue. Blaming local authorities (of any colour) won't do. Eric Pickles has more say in what goes on locally than any locally elected politician. bloodaxe
  • Score: 1

4:43pm Thu 26 Jun 14

petermaycock says...

There maybe a shortage of housing but there must be a shortage of people on the housing list as well as we own a shared ownership flat and want to sell it and the council say that there is no one on there list who qualify to buy it very strange York council why insist on building low cost housing as you tell me there is no one on the list
There maybe a shortage of housing but there must be a shortage of people on the housing list as well as we own a shared ownership flat and want to sell it and the council say that there is no one on there list who qualify to buy it very strange York council why insist on building low cost housing as you tell me there is no one on the list petermaycock
  • Score: 1

10:35pm Thu 26 Jun 14

greenmonkey says...

Zetkin said:
"Action is needed at national level, preferably through an immediate end to council house sales and a massive programme of building new council houses to replace those that have been privatised, coupled with the reintroduction of rent controls.

We can afford this easily if we ditch the three-party consensus that austerity is inevitable and desirable. The British economy, despite the weakness of the current alleged recovery, is in a far stronger condition than it was at the end of the second world war, when we managed to build hundreds of thousands of homes for people that needed them (not just "hardworking families" whatever the hell that means), providing thousands of building jobs in the process."
WELL SAID! Can we use that for Green Party policy statement??
Zetkin said: "Action is needed at national level, preferably through an immediate end to council house sales and a massive programme of building new council houses to replace those that have been privatised, coupled with the reintroduction of rent controls. We can afford this easily if we ditch the three-party consensus that austerity is inevitable and desirable. The British economy, despite the weakness of the current alleged recovery, is in a far stronger condition than it was at the end of the second world war, when we managed to build hundreds of thousands of homes for people that needed them (not just "hardworking families" whatever the hell that means), providing thousands of building jobs in the process." WELL SAID! Can we use that for Green Party policy statement?? greenmonkey
  • Score: 1

11:58pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Old_Man says...

The whole concept of affordable housing is a huge con. An attempt to force private developers to do the work local authorities can't so because they waste money on pointless ideas.
The whole concept of affordable housing is a huge con. An attempt to force private developers to do the work local authorities can't so because they waste money on pointless ideas. Old_Man
  • Score: -1
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