Cancer patients to receive one-to-one nursing support

Patients and staff at the York Hospital Cancer Care Centre mark two of the UK’s leading breast cancer charities-Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Care teaming up with York and Scarborough Hospitals to improve services

Patients and staff at the York Hospital Cancer Care Centre mark two of the UK’s leading breast cancer charities-Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Care teaming up with York and Scarborough Hospitals to improve services

First published in News
Last updated

YORK Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has announced it is working with cancer charities and patients to offer the best possible care to people diagnosed with secondary breast cancer.

York and Scarborough Hospitals have been working with Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Care to make improvements, which include allocating each secondary breast cancer patient a named key worker to act as an advocate, to co-ordinate care and provide support and information as needed on a one-to-one basis.

Other improvements have been identified through patient questionnaires, and patients were also included in discussions to agree on the best way to go about making changes.

Of the 50,000 women and 400 men diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the UK, it is still not known exactly how many of these patients will go on to develop secondary breast cancer – cancer that has spread beyond the breast or armpit to other parts of the body.

Secondary breast cancer cannot be cured but it can be treated and controlled, sometimes for a number of years.

Margaret Ralph, 70, from York who was diagnosed with secondary breast cancer in 2012, said: “Being told that your cancer has spread is an incredibly frightening time and when you hear those words it can be very difficult to process the information you are being given.

“One of the goals set out today is to ensure that a nurse either sits-in on this appointment with you or makes contact within five working days to ensure that any changes being made to your treatment plan are understood and answer any questions you may have once the news has sunk in.

“It is such a good idea to get input from patients themselves, as we are the ones who know what it is like to live with cancer. I’m proud to have had a hand in what I hope will be some really useful changes for other patients like myself in the near future.”

Jackie Frazer, Breast Clinical Nurse Specialist at York Hospital, said: “Listening to patients’ experiences is invaluable and that’s why this project has been so important.

“We are constantly looking at ways to enhance the care we offer and the development of our pledge has allowed us to get a full picture not only of what we are doing well but also what we can be doing to improve our service in future to ensure that we are giving people the best care possible.

“We look forward to implementing the changes highlighted and I also want to thank all of the team here and the surveyed patients who have worked so hard over the past year on this.”

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:32pm Sat 31 May 14

CHISSY1 says...

Fantastic,but why does it have to be a charity.How much does the government contribute?.How much does it throw away abroad,billions,but the n again we dont matter.
Fantastic,but why does it have to be a charity.How much does the government contribute?.How much does it throw away abroad,billions,but the n again we dont matter. CHISSY1
  • Score: -29

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree