Protesters demonstrate at York Barbican against GP appointment charges proposal

Protesters demonstrate against GP charges proposal

Protesters greet delegates at the Local Medical Committee two day Conference at the Barbican in York

Protesters greet delegates at the Local Medical Committee two day Conference at the Barbican in York

First published in News
Last updated
York Press: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

CAMPAIGNERS have demonstrated outside York Barbican against proposals by some GPs to charge patients for appointments.

The protests were staged yesterday by Defend Our NHS York and York People's Assembly when the British Medical Association Local Medical Committee's two-day conference started.

Demonstrator Graham Martin claimed charges would be counter-productive, because they could encourage people not to go to their doctor promptly, allowing their illnesses to worsen before they finally sought help. It would also end a fundamental NHS principle of care, that it was free at the point of use.

Another protester, former nurse Gwen Bardigan, said she was also protesting against creeping privatisation of the NHS, which she claimed was leading to huge pay cuts for some staff.

The conference agenda included increasing demand on GPs, current recruitment and retention issues, and the funding crisis facing GPs.

The proposal to charge for access to general practice was debated and voted on at the conference, and GPs from across the UK resoundingly rejected calls to introduce a charge.

During the debate, GPs expressed concern about the extreme funding pressures facing general practice, but agreed that patients should not be penalised because of a funding shortfall from government.

General practice is under increasing pressure due to rising demand from an ageing population with increasingly complex medical needs.

Dr Chaand Nagpaul, Chair of the BMA GP Committee, said: “Many GPs are frustrated and concerned about the future of general practice given that many GP practices are struggling from a combination of rising patient demand, falling funding and more work being moved from hospitals into the community.

“In this climate, it is understandable that the LMC Conference wanted to debate the need for extra funding for overstretched GP services. But introducing a charge for services would be a tax on illness, hit the most vulnerable the hardest and threaten to undermine the principle of an NHS free at the point of delivery.

"Introducing a financial transaction would undermine the trust between doctor and patient. If patients are deterred from seeing their GP due to an additional cost this could result in their illness deteriorating and costing the NHS even more.

“GPs have today sent a resounding message that charging patients is not the solution to the financial crisis facing the NHS. The BMA is committed to a health service that is free at the point of need and accessible to all and we should proud to have an NHS GP service where no one has to pay to get the treatment they need."

Comments (12)

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11:00am Fri 23 May 14

Archiebold the 1st says...

F@cking hippies...

I'd put the spin on it and say if less people went to see the dr due to this maybe they wouldn't have to wait 2 weeks due to the same old hypochondriacs going once a week......

I'd rather pay to see a dr then go see a nurse and then when they realise i need to see a dr wait another 2 weeks to get in....
F@cking hippies... I'd put the spin on it and say if less people went to see the dr due to this maybe they wouldn't have to wait 2 weeks due to the same old hypochondriacs going once a week...... I'd rather pay to see a dr then go see a nurse and then when they realise i need to see a dr wait another 2 weeks to get in.... Archiebold the 1st
  • Score: -14

11:45am Fri 23 May 14

The Grim Reaper says...

I already pay to see my doctor through the NIC's I make each and every month, along with my employer. To charge per visit would be wrong on so many levels, unless of course the government scrap the portion of NIC's that I contribute to my doctor.
I already pay to see my doctor through the NIC's I make each and every month, along with my employer. To charge per visit would be wrong on so many levels, unless of course the government scrap the portion of NIC's that I contribute to my doctor. The Grim Reaper
  • Score: 17

2:24pm Fri 23 May 14

asd says...

Looks like privatization is nearly upon us of NHS, so all the government pals can race to get equivalent of medicare in USA and all the directors and shareholders reap the reward on peoples needs. EVIL SCUM TORIES.
Looks like privatization is nearly upon us of NHS, so all the government pals can race to get equivalent of medicare in USA and all the directors and shareholders reap the reward on peoples needs. EVIL SCUM TORIES. asd
  • Score: 7

2:25pm Fri 23 May 14

asd says...

Looks like privatization is nearly upon us of NHS, so all the government pals can race to get equivalent of medicare in USA and all the directors and shareholders reap the reward on peoples needs. EVIL SCUM TORIES.
Looks like privatization is nearly upon us of NHS, so all the government pals can race to get equivalent of medicare in USA and all the directors and shareholders reap the reward on peoples needs. EVIL SCUM TORIES. asd
  • Score: -1

7:25pm Fri 23 May 14

Buzzz Light-year says...

Archiebold the 1st wrote:
F@cking hippies...

I'd put the spin on it and say if less people went to see the dr due to this maybe they wouldn't have to wait 2 weeks due to the same old hypochondriacs going once a week......

I'd rather pay to see a dr then go see a nurse and then when they realise i need to see a dr wait another 2 weeks to get in....
Oh yes, they look just like a bunch of hippies don't they?

Yet another purveyor of the false dichotomy.
Protestors aren't concerned people who might be affected by this IE everyone who uses the NHS, no they are soapdodgers. Of course.
[quote][p][bold]Archiebold the 1st[/bold] wrote: F@cking hippies... I'd put the spin on it and say if less people went to see the dr due to this maybe they wouldn't have to wait 2 weeks due to the same old hypochondriacs going once a week...... I'd rather pay to see a dr then go see a nurse and then when they realise i need to see a dr wait another 2 weeks to get in....[/p][/quote]Oh yes, they look just like a bunch of hippies don't they? Yet another purveyor of the false dichotomy. Protestors aren't concerned people who might be affected by this IE everyone who uses the NHS, no they are soapdodgers. Of course. Buzzz Light-year
  • Score: 0

9:05pm Fri 23 May 14

nearlyman says...

Unbelievable.......p
rotesting against something that has not happened !!! Have they nothing better to do ??
Unbelievable.......p rotesting against something that has not happened !!! Have they nothing better to do ?? nearlyman
  • Score: 0

9:28pm Fri 23 May 14

MouseHouse says...

UKIP want to charge for GP visits. People have just voted UKIP, the vast majority having done so without knowing that. The Tories, the Yellow Tories and the Red Tories will all impose GP charging within the next parliament. UKIP are pure 100% establishment, as are the Tories, the Yellow Tories and the Red Tories. They are all capitalist free marketeeers. They all believe in profiting from health care. They believe in profiting from dementia care.

Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest good of everyone (John Maynard Keynes)

If you want a privatised NHS with lower standards and increased costs to us all then fine, if you don't then support these fine, honest decent people. Good luck to them say I.
UKIP want to charge for GP visits. People have just voted UKIP, the vast majority having done so without knowing that. The Tories, the Yellow Tories and the Red Tories will all impose GP charging within the next parliament. UKIP are pure 100% establishment, as are the Tories, the Yellow Tories and the Red Tories. They are all capitalist free marketeeers. They all believe in profiting from health care. They believe in profiting from dementia care. Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest good of everyone (John Maynard Keynes) If you want a privatised NHS with lower standards and increased costs to us all then fine, if you don't then support these fine, honest decent people. Good luck to them say I. MouseHouse
  • Score: 1

11:43pm Fri 23 May 14

electricwarrior says...

People should be charged for missed appointments when they don't turn up and don't ring to let them know.
People should be charged for missed appointments when they don't turn up and don't ring to let them know. electricwarrior
  • Score: 2

12:20am Sat 24 May 14

jumbojet says...

Why try and invent the wheel?
The whole system is bent from GP to Hospital. If you want medical attention, save up your pennies and go private, you will only be treated as a number within the NHS.
I have paid £500,000 into the tax system in the last 10 years, that covers 40% tax and 10% NIC, and I go to my GP for a blood test for Cholesterol and I am told that we don't do that as a normal situation.
When do they do it? when you have had the heart attack. The NHS is in a delicate state, the people on the 'coal face' are superb, but the politics behind the whole system is a disgrace.
Save a few quid, as and when you can, and if you need medical attention, make a call, and you will be sorted, within days, not months, and if the Doctor or Surgeon looks familiar, do not be surprised, he/she will be a paid up member of the NHS, someone trained by the British taxpayer, doing a little bit of work on the side. Everybody is on the make, especially the drug companies, in the pockets of the same 'experts', and you and I still pay into the system.
The sooner the NIC is stopped and each and everyone is left to put the same monies into Private Medicine then the more efficient the system will become, and we may get value for money instead of total contempt and authority.
Why try and invent the wheel? The whole system is bent from GP to Hospital. If you want medical attention, save up your pennies and go private, you will only be treated as a number within the NHS. I have paid £500,000 into the tax system in the last 10 years, that covers 40% tax and 10% NIC, and I go to my GP for a blood test for Cholesterol and I am told that we don't do that as a normal situation. When do they do it? when you have had the heart attack. The NHS is in a delicate state, the people on the 'coal face' are superb, but the politics behind the whole system is a disgrace. Save a few quid, as and when you can, and if you need medical attention, make a call, and you will be sorted, within days, not months, and if the Doctor or Surgeon looks familiar, do not be surprised, he/she will be a paid up member of the NHS, someone trained by the British taxpayer, doing a little bit of work on the side. Everybody is on the make, especially the drug companies, in the pockets of the same 'experts', and you and I still pay into the system. The sooner the NIC is stopped and each and everyone is left to put the same monies into Private Medicine then the more efficient the system will become, and we may get value for money instead of total contempt and authority. jumbojet
  • Score: -3

4:44am Sat 24 May 14

Magicman! says...

jumbojet wrote:
Why try and invent the wheel?
The whole system is bent from GP to Hospital. If you want medical attention, save up your pennies and go private, you will only be treated as a number within the NHS.
I have paid £500,000 into the tax system in the last 10 years, that covers 40% tax and 10% NIC, and I go to my GP for a blood test for Cholesterol and I am told that we don't do that as a normal situation.
When do they do it? when you have had the heart attack. The NHS is in a delicate state, the people on the 'coal face' are superb, but the politics behind the whole system is a disgrace.
Save a few quid, as and when you can, and if you need medical attention, make a call, and you will be sorted, within days, not months, and if the Doctor or Surgeon looks familiar, do not be surprised, he/she will be a paid up member of the NHS, someone trained by the British taxpayer, doing a little bit of work on the side. Everybody is on the make, especially the drug companies, in the pockets of the same 'experts', and you and I still pay into the system.
The sooner the NIC is stopped and each and everyone is left to put the same monies into Private Medicine then the more efficient the system will become, and we may get value for money instead of total contempt and authority.
And why do you think this is allowed? because MP's, a lot of whom are Tories, have huge stakes and shares in private healthcare companies.... you know, because their salary as an MP isn't enough for them to live on apparently so they have to go round screwing up the country to get themselves more money to top up their earnings.
[quote][p][bold]jumbojet[/bold] wrote: Why try and invent the wheel? The whole system is bent from GP to Hospital. If you want medical attention, save up your pennies and go private, you will only be treated as a number within the NHS. I have paid £500,000 into the tax system in the last 10 years, that covers 40% tax and 10% NIC, and I go to my GP for a blood test for Cholesterol and I am told that we don't do that as a normal situation. When do they do it? when you have had the heart attack. The NHS is in a delicate state, the people on the 'coal face' are superb, but the politics behind the whole system is a disgrace. Save a few quid, as and when you can, and if you need medical attention, make a call, and you will be sorted, within days, not months, and if the Doctor or Surgeon looks familiar, do not be surprised, he/she will be a paid up member of the NHS, someone trained by the British taxpayer, doing a little bit of work on the side. Everybody is on the make, especially the drug companies, in the pockets of the same 'experts', and you and I still pay into the system. The sooner the NIC is stopped and each and everyone is left to put the same monies into Private Medicine then the more efficient the system will become, and we may get value for money instead of total contempt and authority.[/p][/quote]And why do you think this is allowed? because MP's, a lot of whom are Tories, have huge stakes and shares in private healthcare companies.... you know, because their salary as an MP isn't enough for them to live on apparently so they have to go round screwing up the country to get themselves more money to top up their earnings. Magicman!
  • Score: 3

5:08pm Sat 24 May 14

MouseHouse says...

jumbojet wrote:
Why try and invent the wheel?
The whole system is bent from GP to Hospital. If you want medical attention, save up your pennies and go private, you will only be treated as a number within the NHS.
I have paid £500,000 into the tax system in the last 10 years, that covers 40% tax and 10% NIC, and I go to my GP for a blood test for Cholesterol and I am told that we don't do that as a normal situation.
When do they do it? when you have had the heart attack. The NHS is in a delicate state, the people on the 'coal face' are superb, but the politics behind the whole system is a disgrace.
Save a few quid, as and when you can, and if you need medical attention, make a call, and you will be sorted, within days, not months, and if the Doctor or Surgeon looks familiar, do not be surprised, he/she will be a paid up member of the NHS, someone trained by the British taxpayer, doing a little bit of work on the side. Everybody is on the make, especially the drug companies, in the pockets of the same 'experts', and you and I still pay into the system.
The sooner the NIC is stopped and each and everyone is left to put the same monies into Private Medicine then the more efficient the system will become, and we may get value for money instead of total contempt and authority.
It's the other way round.

I had private health insurance as part of my pay at a previous job I had. When a close family member, covered by the insurance, was diagnosed with cancer I thought I'd call on their help. Guess what? NHS or private I would be seeing the same consultant and the same medical team at the same time. Chemotherapy would be given at the same place, the same team with the same options.

I am sure you could have a lovely room for an in growing toe nail op but when the chips are down, private insurance is totally pointless.

After that I spoke to my employer and had my private health cover ceased. It was a waste of money.

Save the NHS from the privateers.
[quote][p][bold]jumbojet[/bold] wrote: Why try and invent the wheel? The whole system is bent from GP to Hospital. If you want medical attention, save up your pennies and go private, you will only be treated as a number within the NHS. I have paid £500,000 into the tax system in the last 10 years, that covers 40% tax and 10% NIC, and I go to my GP for a blood test for Cholesterol and I am told that we don't do that as a normal situation. When do they do it? when you have had the heart attack. The NHS is in a delicate state, the people on the 'coal face' are superb, but the politics behind the whole system is a disgrace. Save a few quid, as and when you can, and if you need medical attention, make a call, and you will be sorted, within days, not months, and if the Doctor or Surgeon looks familiar, do not be surprised, he/she will be a paid up member of the NHS, someone trained by the British taxpayer, doing a little bit of work on the side. Everybody is on the make, especially the drug companies, in the pockets of the same 'experts', and you and I still pay into the system. The sooner the NIC is stopped and each and everyone is left to put the same monies into Private Medicine then the more efficient the system will become, and we may get value for money instead of total contempt and authority.[/p][/quote]It's the other way round. I had private health insurance as part of my pay at a previous job I had. When a close family member, covered by the insurance, was diagnosed with cancer I thought I'd call on their help. Guess what? NHS or private I would be seeing the same consultant and the same medical team at the same time. Chemotherapy would be given at the same place, the same team with the same options. I am sure you could have a lovely room for an in growing toe nail op but when the chips are down, private insurance is totally pointless. After that I spoke to my employer and had my private health cover ceased. It was a waste of money. Save the NHS from the privateers. MouseHouse
  • Score: 0

5:37pm Sun 25 May 14

Caecilius says...

nearlyman wrote:
Unbelievable.......p

rotesting against something that has not happened !!! Have they nothing better to do ??
They're protesting against it to try and STOP it happening. If something unacceptable is being planned, you try to prevent it. You don't wait until it's a done deal, then say "Decent people never wanted this, please undo it".
[quote][p][bold]nearlyman[/bold] wrote: Unbelievable.......p rotesting against something that has not happened !!! Have they nothing better to do ??[/p][/quote]They're protesting against it to try and STOP it happening. If something unacceptable is being planned, you try to prevent it. You don't wait until it's a done deal, then say "Decent people never wanted this, please undo it". Caecilius
  • Score: 0

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