Archaeology Live! to excavate the churchyard of All Saints North Street in late March

Archaeological team digging into the past at historic church site

The exterior of All Saints North Street church

A stained-glass window at All Saints North Street church

Church warden Dr Robert Richards

First published in News
Last updated

THE team behind the seven-year-long archaeological dig in Hungate are to move on to the site of an historic church in York.

Archaeology Live! will be starting work at All Saints North Street in late March, excavating in the churchyard and hoping to find evidence of medieval, Viking, and even Roman life on the site.

Church warden Dr Robert Richards said: “We are absolutely thrilled. We like to think we are one of the most archaeologically active churches in York.”

The church has already done various investigations and found evidence of late Roman activity on the site.

Although the finds are waiting expert analysis, the implications could be very exciting for the church’s history, Dr Richards said.

The decision to relocate Archaeology Live! to All Saints North Street came as the excavations at Hungate came to an end. Since bookings opened for the new site the team have seen renewed interest in the training courses they will run at the church.

The first two weeks of digs begin on Monday, March 31, and there will be more work in May, June, August and October.

Assistant field officer Arran Johnson said: “It’s nice to have a fresh site and we expect to find archaeology from the Victorian period going back to medieval, Viking and Roman times. This is a very interesting spot right by the river, and will have been the centre of York for a very long time.”

The digs will take place on the north-east side of the church, and could show evidence that the medieval buildings which surround the site could have at one point extended over it.

Dr Richards said: “It’s very exciting. We have already cleared the site after the church hall was demolished and have found a Norman roof tile lying on the surface.

“It is the site of the medieval rectory as well, and we have already found the 18th-century floor and, beneath that, 12th-century evidence, so very quickly we should be getting back to quite an early period in time.”

To book or raise questions, email trainingdig@yorkat.co.uk or for more information, visit http://www.dighungate.com/content.asp?ID=43

Comments (6)

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10:12am Fri 28 Feb 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?
What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground? Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: -4

10:37am Fri 28 Feb 14

Woody G Mellor says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?
Personally I would love to be dug up in hundreds, if not thousands of years from now, and have my facial features reconstructed from my skull. OK, may seem a tad goulash for some. But I do hope its after more than a year, as I will probably still have squidgy bits.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?[/p][/quote]Personally I would love to be dug up in hundreds, if not thousands of years from now, and have my facial features reconstructed from my skull. OK, may seem a tad goulash for some. But I do hope its after more than a year, as I will probably still have squidgy bits. Woody G Mellor
  • Score: 10

10:58am Fri 28 Feb 14

anistasia says...

Interesting to know about how people lived in York at anytime in history.what they ate and tools they used can work out climate changes.just as long as they don't dig something up with cholera or anthrax that could be airborne and infect people.
Interesting to know about how people lived in York at anytime in history.what they ate and tools they used can work out climate changes.just as long as they don't dig something up with cholera or anthrax that could be airborne and infect people. anistasia
  • Score: 3

11:00am Fri 28 Feb 14

RingoStarr says...

Woody G Mellor wrote:
Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?
Personally I would love to be dug up in hundreds, if not thousands of years from now, and have my facial features reconstructed from my skull. OK, may seem a tad goulash for some. But I do hope its after more than a year, as I will probably still have squidgy bits.
Dinosaur!
[quote][p][bold]Woody G Mellor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?[/p][/quote]Personally I would love to be dug up in hundreds, if not thousands of years from now, and have my facial features reconstructed from my skull. OK, may seem a tad goulash for some. But I do hope its after more than a year, as I will probably still have squidgy bits.[/p][/quote]Dinosaur! RingoStarr
  • Score: 2

11:15am Fri 28 Feb 14

Archaeology York says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?
The site is under the former Boxing Club/Sunday School structure so will not be looking at the main graveyard as such. Any burials encountered will be left in-situ unless they are to be removed at the request of the church.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: What's the statute of limitations on a graveyard? Can its contents be excavated in one year's time? Ten? A hundred? When does it cease being sacred? This is a great argument for cremation. Who - and their family - wants hordes of archaeologists digging them up in x-years time? Whatever happened to hallowed ground?[/p][/quote]The site is under the former Boxing Club/Sunday School structure so will not be looking at the main graveyard as such. Any burials encountered will be left in-situ unless they are to be removed at the request of the church. Archaeology York
  • Score: 11

12:27pm Fri 28 Feb 14

Dig York says...

Indeed, the project isn't currently focusing on the churchyard itself. The immediate environs of the church and their development over time are what we aim to study.
If anyone wants to get involved, trainingdig@yorkat.c
o.uk is the address for enquiries.
Indeed, the project isn't currently focusing on the churchyard itself. The immediate environs of the church and their development over time are what we aim to study. If anyone wants to get involved, trainingdig@yorkat.c o.uk is the address for enquiries. Dig York
  • Score: 8

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