Flying Scotsman restoration can now be completed after tests reveal no major problems

York Press: Flying Scotsman Flying Scotsman

THE National Railway Museum says it’s now full steam ahead to complete the restoration of Flying Scotsman after tests showed it can be repaired.

The York museum was concerned last spring that, having already spent £2.89 million on much delayed repairs to the iconic loco, the viability of the whole restoration project might be in doubt.

It said an independent engineering report had identified that further repairs were needed at a substantial cost, and a small section of the main side frames could not be examined until the steam cylinders were removed.

It said a final assessment of the restoration’s viability would be made once the condition of this final piece was known.

Now the museum has revealed that a detailed examination by specialist engineers, involving extensive non-destructive testing, has confirmed there are no significant problems with the frames, while revealing some “limited issues” with the condition of the cylinders.

“The final assessment of the viability of the restoration has now been made by the museum and its trustees and a resounding go-ahead given,” said a spokeswoman.

“It is hoped that the 1920s locomotive, the sole survivor of the A3 class, will be fit to operate within the stringent requirements of today’s modern railway network by summer 2015.”

NRM director Paul Kirkman said: “We are now progressing full steam ahead towards completing the restoration.”

The spokeswoman said Riley & Son (E) Ltd, Bury, were appointed to complete the work last autumn.

“Once the return to mainline operation is complete, a commercial partnership agreement has been reached, under which Riley & Son (E) Ltd will manage the operation of the locomotive for a period of two years,” she said.

“This will include a programme of ongoing maintenance and helping to resolve any issues that may arise.”

Ian Riley, director of Riley & Son (E) Ltd, Bury, said the frame condition had been found to be acceptable and while the cylinders still needed a lot of attention, these were relatively straightforward problems which could be readily fixed by specialist engineers.

“We are delighted that the restoration is going to plan and we will continue to work together with the museum to see the restoration through to completion and its first two years of operation,” he added.

Comments (7)

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11:07am Mon 27 Jan 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

I'd have thought spending £2,980,000 of public money so far on an obviously clapped out locomotive was a reasonably 'major' problem. With the prospect of 'further repairs at substantial cost', just how expensive does it have to be before it DOES become a 'major' problem?
I'd have thought spending £2,980,000 of public money so far on an obviously clapped out locomotive was a reasonably 'major' problem. With the prospect of 'further repairs at substantial cost', just how expensive does it have to be before it DOES become a 'major' problem? Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: -9

2:50pm Mon 27 Jan 14

JHardacre says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
I'd have thought spending £2,980,000 of public money so far on an obviously clapped out locomotive was a reasonably 'major' problem. With the prospect of 'further repairs at substantial cost', just how expensive does it have to be before it DOES become a 'major' problem?
Philistine.

The phrase "Knowing the cost of everything and the value of nothing" comes to mind.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: I'd have thought spending £2,980,000 of public money so far on an obviously clapped out locomotive was a reasonably 'major' problem. With the prospect of 'further repairs at substantial cost', just how expensive does it have to be before it DOES become a 'major' problem?[/p][/quote]Philistine. The phrase "Knowing the cost of everything and the value of nothing" comes to mind. JHardacre
  • Score: 9

3:47pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Dave Ruddock says...

Hope it get a respray to Geen and not War Years BLACK WITH UNKNOWN number , Green and its commonly known number, if its a National Loco ..
Hope it get a respray to Geen and not War Years BLACK WITH UNKNOWN number , Green and its commonly known number, if its a National Loco .. Dave Ruddock
  • Score: 2

6:10pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Bill Kinghorn says...

It's a very visible and exciting public monument for which most of the Public is glad to see some of it's public money spent; I bet.
It's a very visible and exciting public monument for which most of the Public is glad to see some of it's public money spent; I bet. Bill Kinghorn
  • Score: 10

8:52pm Mon 27 Jan 14

gwen4me says...

Would be a shame to lose it as an operational locomotive. A steam engine is a manifestation of raw power under mans control.
Would be a shame to lose it as an operational locomotive. A steam engine is a manifestation of raw power under mans control. gwen4me
  • Score: 4

6:23am Tue 28 Jan 14

the butler says...

I travelled on that train to York Just after the war, It was loaded with servicemen such as myself, we all thought that it was going at a fair lick some thing like 100mph. It was a thrill back in those days. so I say good luck to the repair work, May it give many more folks a thrill as it did us. the Butler.
I travelled on that train to York Just after the war, It was loaded with servicemen such as myself, we all thought that it was going at a fair lick some thing like 100mph. It was a thrill back in those days. so I say good luck to the repair work, May it give many more folks a thrill as it did us. the Butler. the butler
  • Score: 6

7:52am Tue 28 Jan 14

GBTYZ says...

Dave Ruddock wrote:
Hope it get a respray to Geen and not War Years BLACK WITH UNKNOWN number , Green and its commonly known number, if its a National Loco ..
It might be an unknown number to you, but I agree with you it should be green Brunswick green (Dark green) as its current condition requires and numbered 60103 not apple green as it never ran in this condition. It received the double chimney in 1960 and the German smoke deflectors in 1961 so history demands Brunswick green and 60103, but you can be certain that it will be Apple green because the railway museum will get it WRONG!!!!!!
We need to be as far as possible historically correct.
[quote][p][bold]Dave Ruddock[/bold] wrote: Hope it get a respray to Geen and not War Years BLACK WITH UNKNOWN number , Green and its commonly known number, if its a National Loco ..[/p][/quote]It might be an unknown number to you, but I agree with you it should be green Brunswick green (Dark green) as its current condition requires and numbered 60103 not apple green as it never ran in this condition. It received the double chimney in 1960 and the German smoke deflectors in 1961 so history demands Brunswick green and 60103, but you can be certain that it will be Apple green because the railway museum will get it WRONG!!!!!! We need to be as far as possible historically correct. GBTYZ
  • Score: 4

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