Living wage rate boost for council’s casual workers

York Press: Living wage rate boost for council’s casual workers Living wage rate boost for council’s casual workers

CLEANERS and other casual workers at York’s council are to be paid the “living wage” rate earlier than expected.

The move, increasing the wages of 120 staff in a range of jobs at City of York Council to £7.45 an hour, will be rubber-stamped by the authority’s leader, Coun James Alexander next week, with the rises being backdated to the start of December.

The Labour council was recommended to pay the living wage, which is higher than the minimum wage, by the city’s Fairness Commission in 2012.

The decision boosted the pay of 570 staff and this will now be extended to cleaners, admin assistants, traffic survey workers and midday supervisors, among other roles.

Coun Alexander said: “Being the first local authority in Yorkshire to introduce the Living Wage is something we are particularly proud of.

“My colleagues and I thought it was unfair for the council to pay both permanent staff and those who work for our trading company the living wage, but not casual staff. After a group debate, we decided to proceed with closing this loophole.”

The £13,000 cost of the living wage extension will come from the council’s contingency fund. By March, casual staff will have transferred to the council’s trading company and continue to receive the new payments.

The authority will start building the living wage into new external contracts from April.

Comments (11)

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12:56pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Andy449 says...

£13,000 cost - is that per day, week, month or year? Not that it matters as council tax payers are always happy to pay more money aren't they?

/s
£13,000 cost - is that per day, week, month or year? Not that it matters as council tax payers are always happy to pay more money aren't they? /s Andy449

1:17pm Wed 15 Jan 14

old_geezer says...

Andy449 wrote:
£13,000 cost - is that per day, week, month or year? Not that it matters as council tax payers are always happy to pay more money aren't they?

/s
Nice to see such an expression of common decency and community feeling. I hope this example spreads outwards from direct CYC employment.
[quote][p][bold]Andy449[/bold] wrote: £13,000 cost - is that per day, week, month or year? Not that it matters as council tax payers are always happy to pay more money aren't they? /s[/p][/quote]Nice to see such an expression of common decency and community feeling. I hope this example spreads outwards from direct CYC employment. old_geezer

1:26pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Dave Ruddock says...

Am I reading this right, council workers where being paid under the living wage (this is "below" the loving wage, wether it be parttime, casual or full. I hope I have mis read
Am I reading this right, council workers where being paid under the living wage (this is "below" the loving wage, wether it be parttime, casual or full. I hope I have mis read Dave Ruddock

2:01pm Wed 15 Jan 14

the original Homer says...

Dave Ruddock wrote:
Am I reading this right, council workers where being paid under the living wage (this is "below" the loving wage, wether it be parttime, casual or full. I hope I have mis read
They were being paid the minimum wage, as they legally have to be. The council has now decided to pay them the "living wage", which is the amount deemed necessary to meet today's cost of living.

Minimum wage is 6.31 oer hour. "Living wage" is 7.45 per hour. That's a nice 18 percent rise to those who need it most.

I'm one of the first to criticise the clowns who control our council, but for once I agree with their actions.

It's a shame the minimum wage can't be raised, so that everyone gets a decent wage, but there would be amny people laid off of small companies faced this 18 percent rise in wage bills.

Good to see larger organisations supporting it though, and I for one don't begrudge that use of public money.
[quote][p][bold]Dave Ruddock[/bold] wrote: Am I reading this right, council workers where being paid under the living wage (this is "below" the loving wage, wether it be parttime, casual or full. I hope I have mis read[/p][/quote]They were being paid the minimum wage, as they legally have to be. The council has now decided to pay them the "living wage", which is the amount deemed necessary to meet today's cost of living. Minimum wage is 6.31 oer hour. "Living wage" is 7.45 per hour. That's a nice 18 percent rise to those who need it most. I'm one of the first to criticise the clowns who control our council, but for once I agree with their actions. It's a shame the minimum wage can't be raised, so that everyone gets a decent wage, but there would be amny people laid off of small companies faced this 18 percent rise in wage bills. Good to see larger organisations supporting it though, and I for one don't begrudge that use of public money. the original Homer

4:25pm Wed 15 Jan 14

boroboy66 says...

Does this mean they are to ensure all contractors who are employed to work at the council will also get the living wage ,I doubt it,so soon more jobs will go to contractors who work at council for £6+ph,disgusting
Does this mean they are to ensure all contractors who are employed to work at the council will also get the living wage ,I doubt it,so soon more jobs will go to contractors who work at council for £6+ph,disgusting boroboy66

5:45pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Alf Garnett says...

Good for YCC.
Good for YCC. Alf Garnett

5:50pm Wed 15 Jan 14

browbeaten says...

Easy to do when you are spending other peoples money, as labour do best.
Easy to do when you are spending other peoples money, as labour do best. browbeaten

8:16pm Wed 15 Jan 14

gwen4me says...

The low pay commission are tasked with setting the minimum wage and if they did their job properly there would be no need to fudge the issue like this. It's the same sort of daft thinking that allows HMRC to do cheap tax deals with multinationals.
The low pay commission are tasked with setting the minimum wage and if they did their job properly there would be no need to fudge the issue like this. It's the same sort of daft thinking that allows HMRC to do cheap tax deals with multinationals. gwen4me

2:54am Thu 16 Jan 14

Magicman! says...

the original Homer wrote:
Dave Ruddock wrote:
Am I reading this right, council workers where being paid under the living wage (this is "below" the loving wage, wether it be parttime, casual or full. I hope I have mis read
They were being paid the minimum wage, as they legally have to be. The council has now decided to pay them the "living wage", which is the amount deemed necessary to meet today's cost of living.

Minimum wage is 6.31 oer hour. "Living wage" is 7.45 per hour. That's a nice 18 percent rise to those who need it most.

I'm one of the first to criticise the clowns who control our council, but for once I agree with their actions.

It's a shame the minimum wage can't be raised, so that everyone gets a decent wage, but there would be amny people laid off of small companies faced this 18 percent rise in wage bills.

Good to see larger organisations supporting it though, and I for one don't begrudge that use of public money.
I'm sure the government would be able to create a fund to subsidise small buisnesses to provide its employees a newly-increased minimum wage, if it were to be increased to the 'living wage'.... MP's might not be able to claim their heating bills back as expenses anymore - but seeing as the move would benefit the 'common man' so to speak, then it'd be universally approved; as only an utterly selfish and uncaring MP would put freebies for themselves above giving money to help poorer people to survive.
[quote][p][bold]the original Homer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dave Ruddock[/bold] wrote: Am I reading this right, council workers where being paid under the living wage (this is "below" the loving wage, wether it be parttime, casual or full. I hope I have mis read[/p][/quote]They were being paid the minimum wage, as they legally have to be. The council has now decided to pay them the "living wage", which is the amount deemed necessary to meet today's cost of living. Minimum wage is 6.31 oer hour. "Living wage" is 7.45 per hour. That's a nice 18 percent rise to those who need it most. I'm one of the first to criticise the clowns who control our council, but for once I agree with their actions. It's a shame the minimum wage can't be raised, so that everyone gets a decent wage, but there would be amny people laid off of small companies faced this 18 percent rise in wage bills. Good to see larger organisations supporting it though, and I for one don't begrudge that use of public money.[/p][/quote]I'm sure the government would be able to create a fund to subsidise small buisnesses to provide its employees a newly-increased minimum wage, if it were to be increased to the 'living wage'.... MP's might not be able to claim their heating bills back as expenses anymore - but seeing as the move would benefit the 'common man' so to speak, then it'd be universally approved; as only an utterly selfish and uncaring MP would put freebies for themselves above giving money to help poorer people to survive. Magicman!

3:03am Thu 16 Jan 14

York1900 says...

The best thing about paying a living wage is it reduces the benefit top ups that are need to be paid to people
So it is a win win all round really
The best thing about paying a living wage is it reduces the benefit top ups that are need to be paid to people So it is a win win all round really York1900

1:15pm Thu 16 Jan 14

CaroleBaines says...

Hmm. Some of these casual contracts see workers only paid for certain activities and not for what salaried colleagues get paid for. In this case, the real wage can be well below the living one.
Hmm. Some of these casual contracts see workers only paid for certain activities and not for what salaried colleagues get paid for. In this case, the real wage can be well below the living one. CaroleBaines

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