Hessay farmer calls for ban on Chinese lanterns

York Press: Chinese lanterns, which  farmer Roger Hildreth would like to see banned Chinese lanterns, which farmer Roger Hildreth would like to see banned

A FARMER is calling for a ban on the sale of Chinese lanterns in York to protect farms and animals from the dangers they pose.

Roger Hildreth farms 150 dairy cows at Hessay, just outside the city ring road, and is so worried about the damage wires from the lanterns could do to his herd that he has put magnets in each of the animals’ stomachs.

Mr Hildreth said he had seen straw stacks at neighbouring farms completely destroyed by burning lanterns, while animals face a painful death if they accidentally eat fragments of the lanterns’ wires.

He said: “Last Christmas Eve – a windy night – some lanterns were let off nearby and blew past the farm. They cleared our straw shed by feet. If one had been just a few feet lower we would have lost £100,000.”

He branded the lanterns, which have become increasingly popular in recent years as people celebrate special occasions, a menace and wants to see them outlawed.

“If I stood downwind of someone’s house and let go of burning bits of paper, that would be antisocial.”

Mr Hildreth said he wanted City of York Council to pass a by-law banning the sale or use of the lanterns in York.

As well as fire, the lanterns posed a deadly risk for animals.

When burnt-out lanterns land in grass fields the wires can be caught by modern grass cutters which chop them into small pieces, which then make their way into animal feed.

Mr Hildreth has now placed small magnets - administered like medicines - in the animals’ stomachs to stop wires passing right through their digestive tracts.

He said the practice was growing among cattle farmers, who stand to lose up £3,000 if a cow was to die from eating the wire.

Hessay’s parish council is set to discuss the problem next week but Mr Hildreth Roger hopes the campaign will be taken further.

A spokesman for City of York Council said they would need central Government support to make a by-law banning the lanterns.

Comments (13)

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10:03am Sat 4 Jan 14

Bigwood says...

They are already banned in some countries. I couldn't agree more with Mr Hildreth. Nobody in their right mind would be irresponsible enough to set these floating fires off.
They are already banned in some countries. I couldn't agree more with Mr Hildreth. Nobody in their right mind would be irresponsible enough to set these floating fires off. Bigwood

12:23pm Sat 4 Jan 14

RingoStarr says...

I just can't believe that these things are allowed! BAN THEM!
I just can't believe that these things are allowed! BAN THEM! RingoStarr

12:46pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Older Sometimes Wiser says...

"Mr Hildreth has now placed small magnets - administered like medicines - in the animals’ stomachs to stop wires passing right through their digestive tracts. "
Can anyone please explain how this might work? Only iron based wire might be retained, and what would be the benefits, rather than allowing this to be eliminated through normal process?
Though most people would consider the use of these "Chinese Lantern" fire risks" potentially dangerous particularly in very dry weather, I suspect the actual risks are very low. It would be impossible to police and hardly a worthy news story in this January weather!
"Mr Hildreth has now placed small magnets - administered like medicines - in the animals’ stomachs to stop wires passing right through their digestive tracts. " Can anyone please explain how this might work? Only iron based wire might be retained, and what would be the benefits, rather than allowing this to be eliminated through normal process? Though most people would consider the use of these "Chinese Lantern" fire risks" potentially dangerous particularly in very dry weather, I suspect the actual risks are very low. It would be impossible to police and hardly a worthy news story in this January weather! Older Sometimes Wiser

3:08pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Daisy75 says...

I'm not sure what the people who set these off imagine happens to them. If you wouldn't go onto a strangers land and start a small fire, you shouldn't let these off. They seem to have replaced balloon releases or dove releasing as a memorial for someone who has died- what better memorial than injured animals or accidental fires?
I'm not sure what the people who set these off imagine happens to them. If you wouldn't go onto a strangers land and start a small fire, you shouldn't let these off. They seem to have replaced balloon releases or dove releasing as a memorial for someone who has died- what better memorial than injured animals or accidental fires? Daisy75

3:14pm Sat 4 Jan 14

bolero says...

Unfortunately we all have to suffer inconveniences and sometimes dangerous situations as we go through life; some caused by inconsiderate fellow human beings and some that just cannot be helped. I find one of the most annoying of these occurences is the emergence of a tractor from a ploughed field which then deposits large amounts of mud and filth on the carriageway which causes a hazard to following motorists with a danger of skidding and also splattering the stuff everywhere within a ten metre radius and usually all over the windscreen causing a further danger. There should be a law; if there isn't already one; which requires the operator of these vehicles to clear this dangerous mess from the roadway in order to prevent accidents and the possible loss of a human life.
Unfortunately we all have to suffer inconveniences and sometimes dangerous situations as we go through life; some caused by inconsiderate fellow human beings and some that just cannot be helped. I find one of the most annoying of these occurences is the emergence of a tractor from a ploughed field which then deposits large amounts of mud and filth on the carriageway which causes a hazard to following motorists with a danger of skidding and also splattering the stuff everywhere within a ten metre radius and usually all over the windscreen causing a further danger. There should be a law; if there isn't already one; which requires the operator of these vehicles to clear this dangerous mess from the roadway in order to prevent accidents and the possible loss of a human life. bolero

3:38pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Sillybillies says...

bolero wrote:
Unfortunately we all have to suffer inconveniences and sometimes dangerous situations as we go through life; some caused by inconsiderate fellow human beings and some that just cannot be helped. I find one of the most annoying of these occurences is the emergence of a tractor from a ploughed field which then deposits large amounts of mud and filth on the carriageway which causes a hazard to following motorists with a danger of skidding and also splattering the stuff everywhere within a ten metre radius and usually all over the windscreen causing a further danger. There should be a law; if there isn't already one; which requires the operator of these vehicles to clear this dangerous mess from the roadway in order to prevent accidents and the possible loss of a human life.
The Law
Farmers and vehicle operators who deposit mud on the road are potentially liable for a range of offences. While there is a range of powers available to the police and highways department the primary powers fall under the Highways Act 1980.

Section 148 of the Highways Act 1980 makes it an offence to deposit mud etc. on the highway that would interrupt other users of the highway.

Section 149 of the Highways Act 1980 gives the highways authority the power to clean the road and recover its expenses from the person causing the obstruction.

Section 161 Highways Act 1980 “If a person, without lawful authority or excuse, deposits anything whatsoever on a highway in consequence of which a user of the highway is injured or endangered, that person is guilty of an offence”.
[quote][p][bold]bolero[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately we all have to suffer inconveniences and sometimes dangerous situations as we go through life; some caused by inconsiderate fellow human beings and some that just cannot be helped. I find one of the most annoying of these occurences is the emergence of a tractor from a ploughed field which then deposits large amounts of mud and filth on the carriageway which causes a hazard to following motorists with a danger of skidding and also splattering the stuff everywhere within a ten metre radius and usually all over the windscreen causing a further danger. There should be a law; if there isn't already one; which requires the operator of these vehicles to clear this dangerous mess from the roadway in order to prevent accidents and the possible loss of a human life.[/p][/quote]The Law Farmers and vehicle operators who deposit mud on the road are potentially liable for a range of offences. While there is a range of powers available to the police and highways department the primary powers fall under the Highways Act 1980. Section 148 of the Highways Act 1980 makes it an offence to deposit mud etc. on the highway that would interrupt other users of the highway. Section 149 of the Highways Act 1980 gives the highways authority the power to clean the road and recover its expenses from the person causing the obstruction. Section 161 Highways Act 1980 “If a person, without lawful authority or excuse, deposits anything whatsoever on a highway in consequence of which a user of the highway is injured or endangered, that person is guilty of an offence”. Sillybillies

4:13pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Gazz (Within the Walls) says...

If you use biodegradable eco lanterns which are about £3 each they contain no metal at all and only fall to earth once the central fire card has gone out. Maybe more restrictions on the sale of cheap ones and also maybe some good sense not to let them off when it's windy is what is really needed.
If you use biodegradable eco lanterns which are about £3 each they contain no metal at all and only fall to earth once the central fire card has gone out. Maybe more restrictions on the sale of cheap ones and also maybe some good sense not to let them off when it's windy is what is really needed. Gazz (Within the Walls)

4:20pm Sat 4 Jan 14

anistasia says...

Look nice but ban them if got a flame in there have been farm fires and property lost.and no one can be found guilty as who knows where they come from its an expense to farmers they can do without.
Look nice but ban them if got a flame in there have been farm fires and property lost.and no one can be found guilty as who knows where they come from its an expense to farmers they can do without. anistasia

8:45pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Wiggles says...

Sillybillies wrote:
bolero wrote:
Unfortunately we all have to suffer inconveniences and sometimes dangerous situations as we go through life; some caused by inconsiderate fellow human beings and some that just cannot be helped. I find one of the most annoying of these occurences is the emergence of a tractor from a ploughed field which then deposits large amounts of mud and filth on the carriageway which causes a hazard to following motorists with a danger of skidding and also splattering the stuff everywhere within a ten metre radius and usually all over the windscreen causing a further danger. There should be a law; if there isn't already one; which requires the operator of these vehicles to clear this dangerous mess from the roadway in order to prevent accidents and the possible loss of a human life.
The Law
Farmers and vehicle operators who deposit mud on the road are potentially liable for a range of offences. While there is a range of powers available to the police and highways department the primary powers fall under the Highways Act 1980.

Section 148 of the Highways Act 1980 makes it an offence to deposit mud etc. on the highway that would interrupt other users of the highway.

Section 149 of the Highways Act 1980 gives the highways authority the power to clean the road and recover its expenses from the person causing the obstruction.

Section 161 Highways Act 1980 “If a person, without lawful authority or excuse, deposits anything whatsoever on a highway in consequence of which a user of the highway is injured or endangered, that person is guilty of an offence”.
Perhaps someone could also tell the developers at the John Lewis/Next site at Monks Cross - the link road between Malton Road and Jockey Lane is an absolute disgrace - mud all over the carriageway
[quote][p][bold]Sillybillies[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bolero[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately we all have to suffer inconveniences and sometimes dangerous situations as we go through life; some caused by inconsiderate fellow human beings and some that just cannot be helped. I find one of the most annoying of these occurences is the emergence of a tractor from a ploughed field which then deposits large amounts of mud and filth on the carriageway which causes a hazard to following motorists with a danger of skidding and also splattering the stuff everywhere within a ten metre radius and usually all over the windscreen causing a further danger. There should be a law; if there isn't already one; which requires the operator of these vehicles to clear this dangerous mess from the roadway in order to prevent accidents and the possible loss of a human life.[/p][/quote]The Law Farmers and vehicle operators who deposit mud on the road are potentially liable for a range of offences. While there is a range of powers available to the police and highways department the primary powers fall under the Highways Act 1980. Section 148 of the Highways Act 1980 makes it an offence to deposit mud etc. on the highway that would interrupt other users of the highway. Section 149 of the Highways Act 1980 gives the highways authority the power to clean the road and recover its expenses from the person causing the obstruction. Section 161 Highways Act 1980 “If a person, without lawful authority or excuse, deposits anything whatsoever on a highway in consequence of which a user of the highway is injured or endangered, that person is guilty of an offence”.[/p][/quote]Perhaps someone could also tell the developers at the John Lewis/Next site at Monks Cross - the link road between Malton Road and Jockey Lane is an absolute disgrace - mud all over the carriageway Wiggles

9:01pm Sat 4 Jan 14

bolero says...

In all fairness I have seen roadsweeping vehicles operating on numerous occasions in this area doing what has been pointed out is a requirement under the Road Traffic Act. However, there are other contractors working opposite the Monks C ross site and also on Malton Road. Perhaps these are the parties at fault.
In all fairness I have seen roadsweeping vehicles operating on numerous occasions in this area doing what has been pointed out is a requirement under the Road Traffic Act. However, there are other contractors working opposite the Monks C ross site and also on Malton Road. Perhaps these are the parties at fault. bolero

5:18pm Mon 6 Jan 14

Sillybillies says...

The problem is we don't have a proper police force any more. Mud on the road used to be a serious road safety issue.
The problem is we don't have a proper police force any more. Mud on the road used to be a serious road safety issue. Sillybillies

8:10pm Mon 6 Jan 14

bolero says...

Roadsweeping vehicle in operation adjacent to Monks Cross site this afternoon.
Roadsweeping vehicle in operation adjacent to Monks Cross site this afternoon. bolero

12:01am Tue 7 Jan 14

MouseHouse says...

I used to use these lanterns but gave up two or three years ago. Not keen on blanket banning stuff but there does need to be a lot more though shown before lighting one.
I used to use these lanterns but gave up two or three years ago. Not keen on blanket banning stuff but there does need to be a lot more though shown before lighting one. MouseHouse

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