More than 100 NHS trust staff earn at least £75,000

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First published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by

MORE than 40 people working for the NHS trust which provides mental health and learning disability services in York and Selby are earning more than £100,000.

Forty three people at the Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (LYPFT) earn more than £100,000, and 58 earn more than £75,000.

The highest earner at the trust – which covers York, Leeds, Selby, Tadcaster, Easingwold and parts of North Yorkshire – is a consultant earning almost £183,000, figures released under the Freedom of Information Act show.

The average salary at the trust, which has about 3,280 employees, 842 employed in the York and Selby area, is £28,667. Among the top ten salaries are eight consultants earning between £182,791 and £145,936.

Chris Butler, chief executive of LYPFT, earned between £150,000 and £155,000 in 2012/13, a rise of £5,000 on the preceding year, and another person, whose job title and name has not been revealed, earns £165,934. A trust spokesman said: “The vast majority of salaries towards the higher end of the scale are paid to consultant medical staff; these are in accordance with nationally set terms and conditions and are not decided locally.”

Of those earning more than £100,000, 39 have a clinical or medical role, including psychologists, doctors, consultants and pharmacists. Four with a non-clinical background earn more than £100,000. Of the 58 earning between £75,000 and £100,000, 54 have a medical or clinical background and four do not.

Dr Mick Phythian, a spokesman for York Defend Our NHS, said he hoped all employees would receive fair pay rises to ensure the highly-paid are not receiving rises when the less well paid are not.

He said: “It is also suspected that with the recent NHS restructuring many more high-paid management positions have been created (as the numbers seem to indicate) resulting in less funds being available for the actual medical and mental health services.”

The Press previously reported that five bosses at York Hospital received pay rises totalling £85,000 from 2012-13 as the gap between the highest and lowest paid hospital workers widened.

Dr Alastair Turnbull, the medical director of York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, last year received a rise of about £15,000, taking his annual earnings to between £225,000 and £230,000. Patrick Crowley, chief executive, received a pay rise of about £30,000, taking his annual earnings to between £190,000 and £195,000. The median salary of hospital staff dropped from £25,611 to £24,566.

The hospital trust said executive director salaries were reviewed following the merger of York and Scarborough trusts when the “increased size and complexity of the organisation, and the demands this placed on them” were taken into consideration.

Comments (5)

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11:20am Sat 4 Jan 14

Tom6187 says...

They are happily making cuts to lower paid frontline staff at the same time. All they do is fail to replace Nurses and Midwives when they retire or leave which puts all the remaining staff members under immense pressure. This then causes staff to go off with stress related issues and they have also had their pay frozen for years now.

The whole thing stinks, but it's part of the Tory plan to dismantle the NHS and sell it on to their chums in the private sector, if they manage to get elected again you can kiss goodbye to the NHS.
They are happily making cuts to lower paid frontline staff at the same time. All they do is fail to replace Nurses and Midwives when they retire or leave which puts all the remaining staff members under immense pressure. This then causes staff to go off with stress related issues and they have also had their pay frozen for years now. The whole thing stinks, but it's part of the Tory plan to dismantle the NHS and sell it on to their chums in the private sector, if they manage to get elected again you can kiss goodbye to the NHS. Tom6187
  • Score: 14

3:14pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Can't all be wrong says...

Tom6187 wrote:
They are happily making cuts to lower paid frontline staff at the same time. All they do is fail to replace Nurses and Midwives when they retire or leave which puts all the remaining staff members under immense pressure. This then causes staff to go off with stress related issues and they have also had their pay frozen for years now.

The whole thing stinks, but it's part of the Tory plan to dismantle the NHS and sell it on to their chums in the private sector, if they manage to get elected again you can kiss goodbye to the NHS.
Not sure your right on this one Tom6187.
I can't think of a single private enterprise that would pay so much to so many for what is essentially a chronic failure. Private healthcare companies need to make profits to survive, how that would be possible based on the details quoted is a mystery.
[quote][p][bold]Tom6187[/bold] wrote: They are happily making cuts to lower paid frontline staff at the same time. All they do is fail to replace Nurses and Midwives when they retire or leave which puts all the remaining staff members under immense pressure. This then causes staff to go off with stress related issues and they have also had their pay frozen for years now. The whole thing stinks, but it's part of the Tory plan to dismantle the NHS and sell it on to their chums in the private sector, if they manage to get elected again you can kiss goodbye to the NHS.[/p][/quote]Not sure your right on this one Tom6187. I can't think of a single private enterprise that would pay so much to so many for what is essentially a chronic failure. Private healthcare companies need to make profits to survive, how that would be possible based on the details quoted is a mystery. Can't all be wrong
  • Score: -2

6:19pm Sat 4 Jan 14

againstthecuts says...

They make cuts to frontline services. Nurses and Health care staff have to work short on wards because there is no money to pay extra staff. It seems they don`t` get to the root of they problem by getting rid of the wastage ie managers that earn too much money for doing very little. Maybe they should look at the managers role and what they actually do to earn that money?
They make cuts to frontline services. Nurses and Health care staff have to work short on wards because there is no money to pay extra staff. It seems they don`t` get to the root of they problem by getting rid of the wastage ie managers that earn too much money for doing very little. Maybe they should look at the managers role and what they actually do to earn that money? againstthecuts
  • Score: 7

12:34pm Sun 5 Jan 14

Stan2Attention says...

So let's see if I got this right. 102 people employed by Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust earn more than £75,000 a year. 94 of them are doctors, and their salaries are set nationally, not locally. The other eight are not doctors. Presumably they are senior managers, such as qualified accountants - who also earn big salaries not just in the NHS but in industry too.

I'm not sure I see the point of this story.
So let's see if I got this right. 102 people employed by Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust earn more than £75,000 a year. 94 of them are doctors, and their salaries are set nationally, not locally. The other eight are not doctors. Presumably they are senior managers, such as qualified accountants - who also earn big salaries not just in the NHS but in industry too. I'm not sure I see the point of this story. Stan2Attention
  • Score: 5

2:04pm Mon 6 Jan 14

Steve67Williams says...

So what we have here is a story that an organisation pays large salaries to a relatively small number of highly senior employees (presumably in this case directors, consultants and very senior managers), and pays a lot less to the vast majority of its workforce? This in an industry where pay is dictated by national agreements and carved-in-stone pay banding structures derived from skill-set, experience, and time-served seniority?

There's a word for that... "life".

Would someone point out to me where the "news" is in this? Is this what journalists do for a living now the News of the World is closed?
So what we have here is a story that an organisation pays large salaries to a relatively small number of highly senior employees (presumably in this case directors, consultants and very senior managers), and pays a lot less to the vast majority of its workforce? This in an industry where pay is dictated by national agreements and carved-in-stone pay banding structures derived from skill-set, experience, and time-served seniority? There's a word for that... "life". Would someone point out to me where the "news" is in this? Is this what journalists do for a living now the News of the World is closed? Steve67Williams
  • Score: 0

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