‘Frightening’ figures show more children are obese

York Press: . .

THE number of overweight and obese ten and 11-year-olds in York has risen, according to the latest statistics.

Nationally the proportion of overweight and obese children in reception and year six has dropped since 2011/12.

While there was a fall for reception children in York from 22 per cent to 21.2 per cent, the rates in Year Six have risen from 29.2 per cent in 2011/12 to 30.5 per cent in 2012/13.

However, the proportion of overweight and obese children in York remains lower than the national average, which is 22.2 per cent for reception and 33.3 per cent for year six in 2012/13.

Dr Paul Edmondson-Jones, director of health and wellbeing in York, said: “While City of York Council welcomes the trend of the NCMP figures being below the national average, they are still frightening.

“I would urge parents to reflect on what this data means for the future of our children and what changes could be made through diet and lifestyle to further reduce the problem in York.”

In Ryedale, 24.8 per cent of children in reception were overweight or obese and 29.3 per cent in year six in 2012/13. In Selby, 21.8 per cent in reception and 31.3 per cent in year six were overweight or obese and 21.2 per cent in reception and 28.5 per cent in Year Six in North Yorkshire.

In the East Riding of Yorkshire, 20.9 per cent of children in reception and 32.6 per cent in year six.

Children in England in reception year and Year Six have their height and weight measured as part of the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP).

Comments (5)

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9:46am Fri 27 Dec 13

smudge2 says...

When every empty shop in York and the surrounding area turns into to a coffee or food shop ( nobody else wants these over inflated city centre premises with extortionate rates ) then what can you expect...If you give a child a bag if sweets he's going to eat them and not walk past them.
When every empty shop in York and the surrounding area turns into to a coffee or food shop ( nobody else wants these over inflated city centre premises with extortionate rates ) then what can you expect...If you give a child a bag if sweets he's going to eat them and not walk past them. smudge2

10:33am Fri 27 Dec 13

LittleMissOpinion says...

These ''frightening" figures don't tell the whole story.

My daughter was measured as very overweight. As a deeply concerned mum, I gave the children's dietician a call and asked for their advice. They said I had nothing to worry about since my daughter is really tall and her height/weight are in proportion. If that's the case, why tick the very overweight box?

These figures don't allow for those children who have medical conditions which may affect their weight and where are the figures for the children who measured underweight?

Dr Edmondson-Jones, as a parent I reflected on the future of my child, I asked for help and got absolutely nowhere! When will you reflect on what YOU can do to help parents help our children?
These ''frightening" figures don't tell the whole story. My daughter was measured as very overweight. As a deeply concerned mum, I gave the children's dietician a call and asked for their advice. They said I had nothing to worry about since my daughter is really tall and her height/weight are in proportion. If that's the case, why tick the very overweight box? These figures don't allow for those children who have medical conditions which may affect their weight and where are the figures for the children who measured underweight? Dr Edmondson-Jones, as a parent I reflected on the future of my child, I asked for help and got absolutely nowhere! When will you reflect on what YOU can do to help parents help our children? LittleMissOpinion

1:43pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Art Baker says...

LittleMissOpinion wrote:
These ''frightening" figures don't tell the whole story.

My daughter was measured as very overweight. As a deeply concerned mum, I gave the children's dietician a call and asked for their advice. They said I had nothing to worry about since my daughter is really tall and her height/weight are in proportion. If that's the case, why tick the very overweight box?

These figures don't allow for those children who have medical conditions which may affect their weight and where are the figures for the children who measured underweight?

Dr Edmondson-Jones, as a parent I reflected on the future of my child, I asked for help and got absolutely nowhere! When will you reflect on what YOU can do to help parents help our children?
Not difficult to check tor yourself. Measure height and weight of child and use http://www.nhs.uk/To
ols/Pages/Healthywei
ghtcalculator.aspx to determine whether they are in an ok range or not.
[quote][p][bold]LittleMissOpinion[/bold] wrote: These ''frightening" figures don't tell the whole story. My daughter was measured as very overweight. As a deeply concerned mum, I gave the children's dietician a call and asked for their advice. They said I had nothing to worry about since my daughter is really tall and her height/weight are in proportion. If that's the case, why tick the very overweight box? These figures don't allow for those children who have medical conditions which may affect their weight and where are the figures for the children who measured underweight? Dr Edmondson-Jones, as a parent I reflected on the future of my child, I asked for help and got absolutely nowhere! When will you reflect on what YOU can do to help parents help our children?[/p][/quote]Not difficult to check tor yourself. Measure height and weight of child and use http://www.nhs.uk/To ols/Pages/Healthywei ghtcalculator.aspx to determine whether they are in an ok range or not. Art Baker

2:44pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Sillybillies says...

Art Baker wrote:
LittleMissOpinion wrote:
These ''frightening" figures don't tell the whole story.

My daughter was measured as very overweight. As a deeply concerned mum, I gave the children's dietician a call and asked for their advice. They said I had nothing to worry about since my daughter is really tall and her height/weight are in proportion. If that's the case, why tick the very overweight box?

These figures don't allow for those children who have medical conditions which may affect their weight and where are the figures for the children who measured underweight?

Dr Edmondson-Jones, as a parent I reflected on the future of my child, I asked for help and got absolutely nowhere! When will you reflect on what YOU can do to help parents help our children?
Not difficult to check tor yourself. Measure height and weight of child and use http://www.nhs.uk/To

ols/Pages/Healthywei

ghtcalculator.aspx to determine whether they are in an ok range or not.
Why couldn't whoever ticked the "very overweight" box have used the calculator?

It's at -

http://www.nhs.uk/To
ols/Pages/BMI-health
y-weight-calculator.
aspx
[quote][p][bold]Art Baker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LittleMissOpinion[/bold] wrote: These ''frightening" figures don't tell the whole story. My daughter was measured as very overweight. As a deeply concerned mum, I gave the children's dietician a call and asked for their advice. They said I had nothing to worry about since my daughter is really tall and her height/weight are in proportion. If that's the case, why tick the very overweight box? These figures don't allow for those children who have medical conditions which may affect their weight and where are the figures for the children who measured underweight? Dr Edmondson-Jones, as a parent I reflected on the future of my child, I asked for help and got absolutely nowhere! When will you reflect on what YOU can do to help parents help our children?[/p][/quote]Not difficult to check tor yourself. Measure height and weight of child and use http://www.nhs.uk/To ols/Pages/Healthywei ghtcalculator.aspx to determine whether they are in an ok range or not.[/p][/quote]Why couldn't whoever ticked the "very overweight" box have used the calculator? It's at - http://www.nhs.uk/To ols/Pages/BMI-health y-weight-calculator. aspx Sillybillies

1:32am Sat 28 Dec 13

Magicman! says...

I wonder if these 'increases' would corelate to increased car journeys to/from school, or increased visits to fast food outlets?
I wonder if these 'increases' would corelate to increased car journeys to/from school, or increased visits to fast food outlets? Magicman!

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