University and college staff strike over pay

York Press: The picket line outside York College. The picket line outside York College.

LECTURERS and students in York have marched through the city centre as part of a row over pay.

The protest march went from Micklegate Bar to St Helen’s Square yesterday, as thousands of lecturers and support staff went on their second national strike over a proposed one per cent pay rise, which they say represents a 13 per cent pay cut in real terms since October 2008.

Among them were staff from York College, the University of York St John, Askham Bryan College and the University of York. Four unions staged the one-day walkout – the University and College Union (UCU), Unison, Unite and the Scottish education union EIS.

John Westmoreland, a lecturer at York College, said: “We have balloted over pay, but really the issue is synonymous with protesting against cuts. If you cut education you are cutting away people’s futures. There’s no ecomomic justification for it. I’m not in education for the money but because I want to help make the world a better place and help students make their own way. If you cut education, you are cutting my ability to do that.”

Mr Westmoreland said some 150 staff at the college were in the union, the majority of which went on strike. About ten per cent of the 700 affected staff at York St John University went on strike. The University of York was unable to say how many staff went on strike.

At Askham Bryan College, ten out of 600 staff went on strike, a spokeswoman said. The dispute centres on a one per cent pay rise offered to university staff.

Comments (10)

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6:18pm Tue 3 Dec 13

Digeorge says...

Along with Huddersfield University.
Along with Huddersfield University. Digeorge

8:14am Wed 4 Dec 13

Whitetornado says...

Listening to the video of the union chap, he comments that this year's pay offer has strings attached. I'd like to know what those "strings" are before I can make a judgement on the fairness.

As for his comments on bonuses of those in the private sector, whilst you may agree or disagree, it is not a straight or fair comparison to make and it's for shareholders to take up those issues, as it is for voters to take public sector issues up with Government and Local Government.
Listening to the video of the union chap, he comments that this year's pay offer has strings attached. I'd like to know what those "strings" are before I can make a judgement on the fairness. As for his comments on bonuses of those in the private sector, whilst you may agree or disagree, it is not a straight or fair comparison to make and it's for shareholders to take up those issues, as it is for voters to take public sector issues up with Government and Local Government. Whitetornado

10:49am Wed 4 Dec 13

electricwarrior says...

Lucky to get any pay rise these days.
Lucky to get any pay rise these days. electricwarrior

2:10pm Wed 4 Dec 13

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

Poor things. They don't know they're born.
Poor things. They don't know they're born. Ignatius Lumpopo

3:35pm Wed 4 Dec 13

chelk says...

Should get back to work it was reported yesterday that our Education score had stagnated maybe if they pulled their fingers out it would improve should be paid on results real results not the manipulated kind
Should get back to work it was reported yesterday that our Education score had stagnated maybe if they pulled their fingers out it would improve should be paid on results real results not the manipulated kind chelk

5:34pm Wed 4 Dec 13

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

The reason I think they're a waste of time is I was on a train to London yesterday morning and three university lecturers - from York - sitting behind me were talking about how they could have been manning the picket line at that particular moment but agreed it was a lot more fun taking the day off to go to London to do some Christmas shopping instead.

So, dedication, being hard up and a rich, caring seam of integrity, all wrapped up in one, there.
The reason I think they're a waste of time is I was on a train to London yesterday morning and three university lecturers - from York - sitting behind me were talking about how they could have been manning the picket line at that particular moment but agreed it was a lot more fun taking the day off to go to London to do some Christmas shopping instead. So, dedication, being hard up and a rich, caring seam of integrity, all wrapped up in one, there. Ignatius Lumpopo

8:21pm Wed 4 Dec 13

nearlyman says...

Just no idea whatsoever of life out in the real world .......
Just no idea whatsoever of life out in the real world ....... nearlyman

9:10pm Wed 4 Dec 13

whitehorse says...

Just rview the jobs on offer at the uni. Some have hugely inflated pay packets. Others pay peanuts. No consistency. I'd bet any external candidate wouldn't have a chance at the well paid ones.
Just rview the jobs on offer at the uni. Some have hugely inflated pay packets. Others pay peanuts. No consistency. I'd bet any external candidate wouldn't have a chance at the well paid ones. whitehorse

10:55pm Wed 4 Dec 13

LewisBelton says...

chelk wrote:
Should get back to work it was reported yesterday that our Education score had stagnated maybe if they pulled their fingers out it would improve should be paid on results real results not the manipulated kind
How ignorant actually are you? Do you genuinely think the slipping standards have anything to do with the teachers? If you cut funding to something then of course it's gonna fail, think about what you are saying for christ sake
[quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: Should get back to work it was reported yesterday that our Education score had stagnated maybe if they pulled their fingers out it would improve should be paid on results real results not the manipulated kind[/p][/quote]How ignorant actually are you? Do you genuinely think the slipping standards have anything to do with the teachers? If you cut funding to something then of course it's gonna fail, think about what you are saying for christ sake LewisBelton

11:45pm Wed 4 Dec 13

nearlyman says...

LewisBelton wrote:
chelk wrote:
Should get back to work it was reported yesterday that our Education score had stagnated maybe if they pulled their fingers out it would improve should be paid on results real results not the manipulated kind
How ignorant actually are you? Do you genuinely think the slipping standards have anything to do with the teachers? If you cut funding to something then of course it's gonna fail, think about what you are saying for christ sake
Quite a lot actually............
...........but more to do with parent aspiration for their offspring. Money has considerably less to do with it. Labour threw money at education for years and our kids got worse.


Blair and Gordon Brown made a multibillion-pound investment in education, with the result that we now spend £59,921 on each child between the ages of six and 15. This figure is bettered by only seven other countries, and is twice what China spends. Yet report after report has confirmed that grade inflation has masked poor performance, and that standards have actually fallen.

Nicked from a recent report

Blair and Gordon Brown made a multibillion-pound investment in education, with the result that we now spend £59,921 on each child between the ages of six and 15. This figure is bettered by only seven other countries, and is twice what China spends. Yet report after report has confirmed that grade inflation has masked poor performance, and that standards have actually fallen.
All of which suggests that the real problem is not one of investment, but of an unhealthy culture within parts of the education sector. Shanghai in China was the top-rated jurisdiction in each subject: ironically, a nominally Communist country has embraced aspiration and elitism just as we have abandoned them. Chinese teachers (who are continuously trained throughout their career) enjoy such status that they can call up parents and demand to know whether children are doing their homework. The system does not presume that pupils will slowly specialise, or drop out; the expectation is that they will excel in all areas right up to university. And behind every success story is a tiger mother (or father) pushing their child on. The story is similar across Asia: in Singapore, more than 90 per cent of primary school pupils enjoy private tuition. Compare that to the depressing statistic in the OECD report that 25 per
[quote][p][bold]LewisBelton[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: Should get back to work it was reported yesterday that our Education score had stagnated maybe if they pulled their fingers out it would improve should be paid on results real results not the manipulated kind[/p][/quote]How ignorant actually are you? Do you genuinely think the slipping standards have anything to do with the teachers? If you cut funding to something then of course it's gonna fail, think about what you are saying for christ sake[/p][/quote]Quite a lot actually............ ...........but more to do with parent aspiration for their offspring. Money has considerably less to do with it. Labour threw money at education for years and our kids got worse. Blair and Gordon Brown made a multibillion-pound investment in education, with the result that we now spend £59,921 on each child between the ages of six and 15. This figure is bettered by only seven other countries, and is twice what China spends. Yet report after report has confirmed that grade inflation has masked poor performance, and that standards have actually fallen. Nicked from a recent report Blair and Gordon Brown made a multibillion-pound investment in education, with the result that we now spend £59,921 on each child between the ages of six and 15. This figure is bettered by only seven other countries, and is twice what China spends. Yet report after report has confirmed that grade inflation has masked poor performance, and that standards have actually fallen. All of which suggests that the real problem is not one of investment, but of an unhealthy culture within parts of the education sector. Shanghai in China was the top-rated jurisdiction in each subject: ironically, a nominally Communist country has embraced aspiration and elitism just as we have abandoned them. Chinese teachers (who are continuously trained throughout their career) enjoy such status that they can call up parents and demand to know whether children are doing their homework. The system does not presume that pupils will slowly specialise, or drop out; the expectation is that they will excel in all areas right up to university. And behind every success story is a tiger mother (or father) pushing their child on. The story is similar across Asia: in Singapore, more than 90 per cent of primary school pupils enjoy private tuition. Compare that to the depressing statistic in the OECD report that 25 per nearlyman

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