Couple rescued from car as heavy snow covers North Yorkshire

York Press: Police attend to a vehicle on the A64 near Grimston Bar. Police attend to a vehicle on the A64 near Grimston Bar.

A COUPLE, including a woman who was recovering from surgery, had to be rescued from their car after the vehicle became stuck in a snow drift in North Yorkshire last night.

Several inches of snow fell across the region overnight, leading hazardous driving conditions on many of North Yorkshire’s roads, and a number of drivers being forced to abandon their vehicles.

In one incident, North Yorkshire Fire Service were called to the scene, on the road between Stape and Egton, in the North York Moors, at about 7.30pm yesterday, after the couple had tried to dig themselves free from the snow drift for over two hours when their breakdown service refused to attend.

A spokesman for the Fire Service said the couple were rescued and taken to a local hotel, but reminded the public that crews would ordinarily only attend incidents where life was at risk.

A spokesman for the Highways Agency warned motorists to take extra care when travelling, due to the increased risk of adverse driving conditions through heavy snow which covered North Yorkshire last night.

He said: “Road users across England are being advised to check the latest weather forecast and road conditions before they travel today as significant snow is currently being experienced.

“Road users are also advised to plan their journey before they set out, to leave extra time if travel conditions are poor or to consider delaying their journey if the weather becomes severe.”

Although the snow stopped in the early hours of this morning, the Met Office has predicted heavy rain from about 9pm and overnight, which could lead to a rapid thaw, and possibly some flooding in the region.

Comments (7)

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2:02pm Sat 26 Jan 13

again says...

Would compliment the York gritters for the excellent job they made of our local roads overnight.

Well done them.
Would compliment the York gritters for the excellent job they made of our local roads overnight. Well done them. again
  • Score: 0

12:17am Sun 27 Jan 13

jumbojet says...

Any chance of knowing which breakdown service refused to attend, and the reason, I am due to pay my annual fee,and I would hope it's some obscure company who reacts in this way.
Any chance of knowing which breakdown service refused to attend, and the reason, I am due to pay my annual fee,and I would hope it's some obscure company who reacts in this way. jumbojet
  • Score: 0

3:33pm Sun 27 Jan 13

metsaagain says...

jumbojet wrote:
Any chance of knowing which breakdown service refused to attend, and the reason, I am due to pay my annual fee,and I would hope it's some obscure company who reacts in this way.
Difficult to know the details- but in this situation I don't really blame the breakdown service. First, if the snow is that bad then there is no reason to believe that the breakdown van itself won't be at risk from being trapped/snowed in/ Secondly, in this kind of weather, there is usually a massive increase in calls on the AA/RAC etc, so it is fair that they should prioritise genuine breakdowns rather than digging someone out, which however once looks at it, is not a mechanical issue and arguably self-inflicted- it's not like this snow wasn't forecast and major warnings weren't in place!
[quote][p][bold]jumbojet[/bold] wrote: Any chance of knowing which breakdown service refused to attend, and the reason, I am due to pay my annual fee,and I would hope it's some obscure company who reacts in this way.[/p][/quote]Difficult to know the details- but in this situation I don't really blame the breakdown service. First, if the snow is that bad then there is no reason to believe that the breakdown van itself won't be at risk from being trapped/snowed in/ Secondly, in this kind of weather, there is usually a massive increase in calls on the AA/RAC etc, so it is fair that they should prioritise genuine breakdowns rather than digging someone out, which however once looks at it, is not a mechanical issue and arguably self-inflicted- it's not like this snow wasn't forecast and major warnings weren't in place! metsaagain
  • Score: 0

7:09pm Sun 27 Jan 13

bagnall1928@yahoo.com says...

my late father told me always to travel with a shovel and gloves in the boot of my car when traveling in winter.
also an old piece of carpet, this helps to put under the rear wheels of a car which
helps it to move out of mud, ice or snow.
my late father told me always to travel with a shovel and gloves in the boot of my car when traveling in winter. also an old piece of carpet, this helps to put under the rear wheels of a car which helps it to move out of mud, ice or snow. bagnall1928@yahoo.com
  • Score: 0

12:23am Mon 28 Jan 13

jumbojet says...

Metsaagain, I here what you say, and you are correct, if the breakdown service has a full list of problems then self-inflicted will come very near the bottom. Maybe a little white lie, like battery flat, or will not start due 'wiggly amps' not finding the correct route to plugs, just a thought. Everyone is home and dry now, so maybe they will have learnt a winter lesson.
Metsaagain, I here what you say, and you are correct, if the breakdown service has a full list of problems then self-inflicted will come very near the bottom. Maybe a little white lie, like battery flat, or will not start due 'wiggly amps' not finding the correct route to plugs, just a thought. Everyone is home and dry now, so maybe they will have learnt a winter lesson. jumbojet
  • Score: 0

1:59am Mon 28 Jan 13

DYLANESQ says...

Winters here in N.America can be and often are fatal to those that travel unprepared. Even in Britain,especially as winters are slated to continue to get worse as the Gulf Stream cools from the melting icecap and given that winter tyres may not be the norm, people can get stranded. A simple skid over an embankment in heavy snowfall and days trapped in a car can be survived (some have survived 7 days) if you prepare. Some items you should not feel embarassed to carry in a bag all winter are :Down sleeping bag; change of underwear and socks: toilet paper,Tylenol,flanne
ls,a hammer or windscreen breaking tool,long shoelaces (to use as tourniquet) a flare,shovel, tire 'crampons' to lay on snow to get traction,a box of Granola bars,2 quarts of bottled water,torch, extra heavy gloves, an aerosol horn,pen and paper, local map, spare petrol,small bundle of kindling (to start an outside fire), blanket, lightly salted snack and anything else you can think of. Well packed this emergency kit can take up little room and, you never know, you may use it to help someone else.
Winters here in N.America can be and often are fatal to those that travel unprepared. Even in Britain,especially as winters are slated to continue to get worse as the Gulf Stream cools from the melting icecap and given that winter tyres may not be the norm, people can get stranded. A simple skid over an embankment in heavy snowfall and days trapped in a car can be survived (some have survived 7 days) if you prepare. Some items you should not feel embarassed to carry in a bag all winter are :Down sleeping bag; change of underwear and socks: toilet paper,Tylenol,flanne ls,a hammer or windscreen breaking tool,long shoelaces (to use as tourniquet) a flare,shovel, tire 'crampons' to lay on snow to get traction,a box of Granola bars,2 quarts of bottled water,torch, extra heavy gloves, an aerosol horn,pen and paper, local map, spare petrol,small bundle of kindling (to start an outside fire), blanket, lightly salted snack and anything else you can think of. Well packed this emergency kit can take up little room and, you never know, you may use it to help someone else. DYLANESQ
  • Score: 0

2:05am Mon 28 Jan 13

DYLANESQ says...

Add to the above. One or two 20 lb bag of rock salt in the boot, over rear wheels (keeps back end of car down, reduces skidding) and can be used to melt ice; matches; basic medical kit. Always remember if you do get in this situation. Try to stay calm, assess any injuries and deal with them, call for help but don't overuse mobile phone. Crack window slightly to allow for air exchange.Do not run engine if car is deep in snow as fumes can kill you.
Add to the above. One or two 20 lb bag of rock salt in the boot, over rear wheels (keeps back end of car down, reduces skidding) and can be used to melt ice; matches; basic medical kit. Always remember if you do get in this situation. Try to stay calm, assess any injuries and deal with them, call for help but don't overuse mobile phone. Crack window slightly to allow for air exchange.Do not run engine if car is deep in snow as fumes can kill you. DYLANESQ
  • Score: 0

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