Spotlight on East coast rail route investment

First published in News

COUNCIL leaders from towns and cities along the East Coast Main Line have met in York to mark out priorities for investing in the rail route.

The first meeting of the representatives from local authorities from Stevenage to Scotland was held last month after being instigated by City of York Council leader James Alexander, coinciding with the Department for Transport confirming the franchise for the line would not be put on hold.

The councils, who met again yesterday, have teamed up to “present a strong position” to the Government and call for improvements to the route’s infrastructure so it can cope with demand. Coun Alexander said: “York has very close ties with the railway and the rail industry, and for the first time local authorities have come together to lobby for the future of the line.

“We are making a difference, as since our first meeting Transport Minister Norman Baker said the Government was now playing its part to increase capacity on the route over the next two years.”

Coun Alexander said the councils were looking to identify ways of working together to maximise the economic benefits of the line, and are seeking “fuller involvement” in the process to decide who takes on the franchise.

Comments (9)

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9:10am Wed 28 Nov 12

pedalling paul says...

Presumably they will have looked through Network Rail's Route Utilisation Strategy for the ECML.......they manage the nuts & bolts of the railway. Train Operators like East Coast buy track access from Network Rail.
The level of service that East Coast & others can run depends on track capacity, and also the incredibly high cost of leasing the trains that they use.
Presumably they will have looked through Network Rail's Route Utilisation Strategy for the ECML.......they manage the nuts & bolts of the railway. Train Operators like East Coast buy track access from Network Rail. The level of service that East Coast & others can run depends on track capacity, and also the incredibly high cost of leasing the trains that they use. pedalling paul
  • Score: 0

9:41am Wed 28 Nov 12

old_geezer says...

Presumably the electrification announced a few months ago, which was eventually clarified to be continuous from Manchester to Newcastle, is still on? (Initially didn't mention Micklefield - Colton).
Presumably the electrification announced a few months ago, which was eventually clarified to be continuous from Manchester to Newcastle, is still on? (Initially didn't mention Micklefield - Colton). old_geezer
  • Score: 0

9:58am Wed 28 Nov 12

Gladys Cheesepick says...

Hi old_geezer and pedalling paul.
Yes to both.
Regards
Hi old_geezer and pedalling paul. Yes to both. Regards Gladys Cheesepick
  • Score: 0

9:59am Wed 28 Nov 12

Gladys Cheesepick says...

I imagine
I imagine Gladys Cheesepick
  • Score: 0

11:11am Wed 28 Nov 12

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

Bigger trains (ie. longer, and less cramped) could be a start.
Bigger trains (ie. longer, and less cramped) could be a start. Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 0

12:00pm Wed 28 Nov 12

Capt. Dobie says...

What Lumpopo says.

And also a carriage for Geordie/ Maccam/ Sanddancer/ Monkeyhanger drunkards swearing their way to York for whatever reason at 9.30am...I always enjoy explaining to my 3 yr old what that word the loud lady said means.

A family carriage perhaps, or seat bookings that work and don't get 'stolen', but certainly more room.
What Lumpopo says. And also a carriage for Geordie/ Maccam/ Sanddancer/ Monkeyhanger drunkards swearing their way to York for whatever reason at 9.30am...I always enjoy explaining to my 3 yr old what that word the loud lady said means. A family carriage perhaps, or seat bookings that work and don't get 'stolen', but certainly more room. Capt. Dobie
  • Score: 0

5:09pm Wed 28 Nov 12

babmed says...

http://www.uobabylon
.edu.iq/scientific-v
ice
http://www.uobabylon .edu.iq/scientific-v ice babmed
  • Score: 0

5:16pm Wed 28 Nov 12

Caecilius says...

How about some investment in solving the perennial issue of overhead power lines "coming" down (i.e., being pulled down by a train), causing hours of delay and inconvenience for customers. And yes, seat bookings that can be relied on, rather than the all too frequent announcement that "there are no reservations on this service today".
How about some investment in solving the perennial issue of overhead power lines "coming" down (i.e., being pulled down by a train), causing hours of delay and inconvenience for customers. And yes, seat bookings that can be relied on, rather than the all too frequent announcement that "there are no reservations on this service today". Caecilius
  • Score: 0

2:07am Sat 1 Dec 12

Magicman! says...

The problem with the overhead wires has been caused by the government at the time of electrification cheapskating the works and so it was all done on a budget... we have catenary-style power line suspension equipment as compared to the west coast which has the wires hung from steel girders - the result on the east coast being the wires come down every time a cow f@rts in the wrong direction.

The class 91 electric loco's and the Mk4 carriages that make up the electric trains have had plans drawn up for a full refurbishment - the 91's will get a second pantograph fitted so that if the primary one gets ripped off on the wires the secondary one will go up and the train will continue.

Capacity issues that could be looked at include the flat crossways at Newark, as this reduces capacity on both lines significantly. In addition, building platforms at Northallerton Low Level would increase capacity as Middlesbrough and Sunderland services could use those platforms thereby freeing up the mainline for faster trains to go past whilst a train was waiting at low level.
The problem with the overhead wires has been caused by the government at the time of electrification cheapskating the works and so it was all done on a budget... we have catenary-style power line suspension equipment as compared to the west coast which has the wires hung from steel girders - the result on the east coast being the wires come down every time a cow f@rts in the wrong direction. The class 91 electric loco's and the Mk4 carriages that make up the electric trains have had plans drawn up for a full refurbishment - the 91's will get a second pantograph fitted so that if the primary one gets ripped off on the wires the secondary one will go up and the train will continue. Capacity issues that could be looked at include the flat crossways at Newark, as this reduces capacity on both lines significantly. In addition, building platforms at Northallerton Low Level would increase capacity as Middlesbrough and Sunderland services could use those platforms thereby freeing up the mainline for faster trains to go past whilst a train was waiting at low level. Magicman!
  • Score: 0

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