Flood warnings issued due to heavy rain

An angler takes advantage of the rising floodwater in York on Queen’s Staith

Lawrence Waterhouse tackles the floodwater in his kitchen in Main Street Saxton

Chairman of the village flood defence committee, Jan Marshall, outside her house in Main Street, Saxton

Flood water in Wilberfoss

The swollen beck in Pocklington

Richard Frost wades through floodwater in Wyman Lane in Sutton on Derwent

First published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by

HEAVY rain has caused flooding across North Yorkshire and the East Riding.

This evening there are 15 flood warnings in place across the North East - meaning flooding is expected - and 33 flood alerts with firefighters having been called out to numerous incidents across the region.

Forecasters have predicted heavy rain into tomorrow with the Met Office and the Environment Agency urging the public to prepare for possible travel disruption and flooding.

Eddy Carroll, Met Office Chief Forecaster, said: “The heaviest and most persistent rain on Sunday night and into Monday is expected to be over parts of northern England and north Wales.

“Here we can expect between 30 and 40 mm of rain falling in many areas and up to 70 mm of rain in parts of northeast England, continuing the risk of further flooding and travel disruption. We urge everyone to keep up to date with forecasts and warnings and be prepared for what the weather will bring.”

North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue said it had been called out to over 30 flooding-related incidents today.

Among the numerous call-outs for the fire service today, crews spent hours pumping water in Saxton near Tadcaster where a number of properties were flooded, and working to stop water from surrounding fields entering the village.

Firefighters pumped water from properties in Sandy Lane in Stockton on the Forest, Hob Moor in York, Sessay, Little Ouseburn, Pilmoor, Tockwith, and Cliffe near SelbyDunnington, Pickering, Harrogate, Cattal, Norton and Ripon.

Main Street in Sutton Upon Derwent was closed by floods and Humberside Fire and Rescue Service dealt with localised flooding in Wilberfoss and flooding to a basement in Seven Corners Lane in Beverley.

Meanwhile, two people were rescued at Boghole Bank in Thimbleby after becoming trapped on a bank near a waterfall. They were taken to hospital for treatment for hypothermia, a fire service spokesman said.

The Enviroment Agency has put flood warnings in place for Kings Staith, Queens Staith, South Esplanade and New Walk next to the Ouse in York and for Pocklington Beck and properties on or next to Main Street, Pocklington.

Further warnings were made for the River Derwent at Buttercrambe Mill, beckside properties in Bishop Monkton and Hovingham Beck at Hovingham.

Comments (12)

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1:37pm Sun 25 Nov 12

notsmallminded says...

I think this is the wettest rain that has been seen for years.
I think this is the wettest rain that has been seen for years. notsmallminded
  • Score: 0

3:57pm Sun 25 Nov 12

MrChuckles says...

Sigh... people build near rivers and get surprised when it floods, or a warning is issued.
They also insist on putting concrete and tarmac over all the land, then...act surprised when flash flooding becomes an issue.
They then build £60million+ flood defences, and once again act surprised when the flood has simply been moved 5 mile down the river.
I could go on, but long story short...humans never fail to amuse me.
The insistance in attempting to fit more than a pint in a pint glass, is however admirable, but nature will always win.
Sigh... people build near rivers and get surprised when it floods, or a warning is issued. They also insist on putting concrete and tarmac over all the land, then...act surprised when flash flooding becomes an issue. They then build £60million+ flood defences, and once again act surprised when the flood has simply been moved 5 mile down the river. I could go on, but long story short...humans never fail to amuse me. The insistance in attempting to fit more than a pint in a pint glass, is however admirable, but nature will always win. MrChuckles
  • Score: 0

6:00pm Sun 25 Nov 12

anistasia says...

We've had flooding for years like this and each government says we'll do something about it but nothings propley worked and money always seems to come to help people back on their feet after a flood but cutbacks in money up front.the old saying prevention better than the cure.how many times do villages around York have to get flooded before something is done.spend the money on flood defences not the aftermath of it all.
We've had flooding for years like this and each government says we'll do something about it but nothings propley worked and money always seems to come to help people back on their feet after a flood but cutbacks in money up front.the old saying prevention better than the cure.how many times do villages around York have to get flooded before something is done.spend the money on flood defences not the aftermath of it all. anistasia
  • Score: 0

6:18pm Sun 25 Nov 12

MrChuckles says...

anistasia wrote:
We've had flooding for years like this and each government says we'll do something about it but nothings propley worked and money always seems to come to help people back on their feet after a flood but cutbacks in money up front.the old saying prevention better than the cure.how many times do villages around York have to get flooded before something is done.spend the money on flood defences not the aftermath of it all.
anistasia - That is precisely my point! You can't expect to defend against something such as flooding! All it does is move the problem. You still have the same volume of water, no matter how many multi-million pound mounds of mud you build, this volume of water has to somewhere... p*ssing into the wind about sums it up.
[quote][p][bold]anistasia[/bold] wrote: We've had flooding for years like this and each government says we'll do something about it but nothings propley worked and money always seems to come to help people back on their feet after a flood but cutbacks in money up front.the old saying prevention better than the cure.how many times do villages around York have to get flooded before something is done.spend the money on flood defences not the aftermath of it all.[/p][/quote]anistasia - That is precisely my point! You can't expect to defend against something such as flooding! All it does is move the problem. You still have the same volume of water, no matter how many multi-million pound mounds of mud you build, this volume of water has to somewhere... p*ssing into the wind about sums it up. MrChuckles
  • Score: 0

7:54pm Sun 25 Nov 12

PKH says...

I note the Monks Cross link road is flooded and closed yet again, this is now a regular occurrence it's about time CYC cleaned out the drains
I note the Monks Cross link road is flooded and closed yet again, this is now a regular occurrence it's about time CYC cleaned out the drains PKH
  • Score: 0

8:38pm Sun 25 Nov 12

Kelly Smunt says...

If you don't want to be flooded, don't live in a flood plain.

What do people expect, a 50 foot diameter pipeline to carry the Ouse from the Dales to the Humber.
If you don't want to be flooded, don't live in a flood plain. What do people expect, a 50 foot diameter pipeline to carry the Ouse from the Dales to the Humber. Kelly Smunt
  • Score: 0

3:34am Mon 26 Nov 12

Magicman! says...

The only solution to york flooding would be a big tunnel under the city going straight from Rawcliffe Ings to the Humber Bridge.


Huntington Road was flooded at the iron bridge by 3pm today, and was still the same level or a bit deeper by time I came back at after 10pm (a taxi driver advised me to cycle on the pavement so as to not get wet feet...)

I also expect there to be a lake on the foss island cycle path near tang hall library - ever since the route was closed to lay electric cables under the path there is now always a lake there, surely the contractors had an obligation to "make good" their work in backfilling to make sure the land was not higher than the pathway? Additionally there has been a small lake on the cycle route from Metcalf Lane to Meadlands for about 3 months now.


By the way, I didn't realise there was a place called BOGHOLE!!
The only solution to york flooding would be a big tunnel under the city going straight from Rawcliffe Ings to the Humber Bridge. Huntington Road was flooded at the iron bridge by 3pm today, and was still the same level or a bit deeper by time I came back at after 10pm (a taxi driver advised me to cycle on the pavement so as to not get wet feet...) I also expect there to be a lake on the foss island cycle path near tang hall library - ever since the route was closed to lay electric cables under the path there is now always a lake there, surely the contractors had an obligation to "make good" their work in backfilling to make sure the land was not higher than the pathway? Additionally there has been a small lake on the cycle route from Metcalf Lane to Meadlands for about 3 months now. By the way, I didn't realise there was a place called BOGHOLE!! Magicman!
  • Score: 0

7:51am Mon 26 Nov 12

Guy Fawkes says...

By the way, I didn't realise there was a place called BOGHOLE!!


Take a visit to the Shetland Islands and you'll find villages called Sodom and Twatt, if that floats your boat...

We've had flooding for years like this and each government says we'll do something about it but nothings propley worked and money always seems to come to help people back on their feet after a flood but cutbacks in money up front.


On the contrary, the government is doing too much. We were told on the Today programme just now that the ritual every few years whereby the insurance industry tells the government that it'll only maintain flood cover for high-risk properties if the government spends more on flood defences is currently in progress. It's more than likely that some fudge will be worked up, the flood cover will continue, all our premiums will increase (including those for low and no-risk homes), and, with this moral hazard in place, developers will continue to build on cheap, flood-prone land such as Germany Beck, secure in the knowledge that they're being subsidised by the insurance industry and the government.

This needs to stop, and those who live in high risk properties need to take that risk on themselves. They either knew, or should have known about the risk when they bought these homes - after all, there was a reason why they were relatively cheap. If homes at high risk of flooding become uninsurable, then developers will stop building them and this problem will then gradually go away.
[quote]By the way, I didn't realise there was a place called BOGHOLE!![/quote] Take a visit to the Shetland Islands and you'll find villages called Sodom and Twatt, if that floats your boat... [quote]We've had flooding for years like this and each government says we'll do something about it but nothings propley worked and money always seems to come to help people back on their feet after a flood but cutbacks in money up front.[/quote] On the contrary, the government is doing too much. We were told on the Today programme just now that the ritual every few years whereby the insurance industry tells the government that it'll only maintain flood cover for high-risk properties if the government spends more on flood defences is currently in progress. It's more than likely that some fudge will be worked up, the flood cover will continue, all our premiums will increase (including those for low and no-risk homes), and, with this moral hazard in place, developers will continue to build on cheap, flood-prone land such as Germany Beck, secure in the knowledge that they're being subsidised by the insurance industry and the government. This needs to stop, and those who live in high risk properties need to take that risk on themselves. They either knew, or should have known about the risk when they bought these homes - after all, there was a reason why they were relatively cheap. If homes at high risk of flooding become uninsurable, then developers will stop building them and this problem will then gradually go away. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

9:40am Mon 26 Nov 12

Guy Forks says...

Well if we all chip in a few quid maybe we can have a crack at recreating some of this Japanese engineering....

http://www.water-tec
hnology.net/projects
/g-cans-project-toky
o-japan/
Well if we all chip in a few quid maybe we can have a crack at recreating some of this Japanese engineering.... http://www.water-tec hnology.net/projects /g-cans-project-toky o-japan/ Guy Forks
  • Score: 0

3:32pm Wed 28 Nov 12

yorkborn66 says...

notsmallminded wrote:
I think this is the wettest rain that has been seen for years.
Has rain been drier in previous years then ?
[quote][p][bold]notsmallminded[/bold] wrote: I think this is the wettest rain that has been seen for years.[/p][/quote]Has rain been drier in previous years then ? yorkborn66
  • Score: 0

3:38pm Wed 28 Nov 12

anistasia says...

Summer 1976 the rain was less wet
Summer 1976 the rain was less wet anistasia
  • Score: 0

11:15pm Wed 28 Nov 12

yorkborn66 says...

anistasia wrote:
Summer 1976 the rain was less wet
Your are dead right August 1976, wonderful dry rain. Severe drought. 1975 was also very dry.
[quote][p][bold]anistasia[/bold] wrote: Summer 1976 the rain was less wet[/p][/quote]Your are dead right August 1976, wonderful dry rain. Severe drought. 1975 was also very dry. yorkborn66
  • Score: 0

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