Some drivers don’t have the foggiest

I COMMUTE daily doing a round trip of about 80 miles from Rawcliffe and one of the biggest irritations on my commute at the moment is the number of drivers who do not have the foggiest idea of when to turn on and when turn OFF fog lights, especially in the mist.

Recently I had the misfortune of following a car from Birch Park to Bootham which had its fog lights on and then, to add insult to injury, every time the driver pulled up at the lights he sat with his foot on the brake so I finished up with FIVE high intensity lights filling my windscreen.

Do these drivers who switch their fog lights on ever think about what they are doing?

Mick Quinn, Holyrood Drive, Rawcliffe, York.

Comments (8)

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11:55am Fri 18 Jan 13

sensationalism says...

I believe it's illegal to have high-intensity rear lights on when there's no need. However, it's possible to knock the switch on with your knee accidently as you get into a Vauxhall Zafira.
I believe it's illegal to have high-intensity rear lights on when there's no need. However, it's possible to knock the switch on with your knee accidently as you get into a Vauxhall Zafira. sensationalism

7:03pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Peat974 says...

for yea verily they are stupid and know not what they do along with they that have the front fog lights on and need a good kicking.
for yea verily they are stupid and know not what they do along with they that have the front fog lights on and need a good kicking. Peat974

8:35pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Omega Point says...

The stationary car in front with break lights on may be an automatic, where foot on break is correct procedure for short stops when neutral not engaged.

I am a bit worried that the letter writer allows minor irritations to interfere with their concentration.
The stationary car in front with break lights on may be an automatic, where foot on break is correct procedure for short stops when neutral not engaged. I am a bit worried that the letter writer allows minor irritations to interfere with their concentration. Omega Point

9:26pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Stevie D says...

@Omega Point – yes, the car might be an automatic, but I see many more cars sitting with their brake lights on than there are automatics out there. No, it isn't a huge deal, but it's inconsiderate and can really screw up the driver behind's night vision. Not to mention it being less safe, if the guy isn't using his handbrake as well.

It's one of those little things that takes no effort to do, and if drivers thought a little bit about what they were doing, and didn't carelessly dazzle the driver behind, it would make the roads that little bit nicer for everyone.
@Omega Point – yes, the car [italic]might[/italic] be an automatic, but I see many more cars sitting with their brake lights on than there are automatics out there. No, it isn't a huge deal, but it's inconsiderate and can really screw up the driver behind's night vision. Not to mention it being less safe, if the guy isn't using his handbrake as well. It's one of those little things that takes no effort to do, and if drivers thought a little bit about what they were doing, and didn't carelessly dazzle the driver behind, it would make the roads that little bit nicer for everyone. Stevie D

9:33pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Willy Eckerslike says...

What's more worrying is the number of cars driving around with one headlight not working, seems like there is an plague of them this winter.
What's more worrying is the number of cars driving around with one headlight not working, seems like there is an plague of them this winter. Willy Eckerslike

10:59pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Mickq555 says...

Omega Point wrote:
The stationary car in front with break lights on may be an automatic, where foot on break is correct procedure for short stops when neutral not engaged. I am a bit worried that the letter writer allows minor irritations to interfere with their concentration.
Maybe if you commute in excess of 20k miles a year and see clearly incompetent driving standards daily while you are fully concentrating on your driving, you may just find something like that more than a minor irritation!!
[quote][p][bold]Omega Point[/bold] wrote: The stationary car in front with break lights on may be an automatic, where foot on break is correct procedure for short stops when neutral not engaged. I am a bit worried that the letter writer allows minor irritations to interfere with their concentration.[/p][/quote]Maybe if you commute in excess of 20k miles a year and see clearly incompetent driving standards daily while you are fully concentrating on your driving, you may just find something like that more than a minor irritation!! Mickq555

8:45am Sat 19 Jan 13

Peterwalker says...

T.V Public information films used to remind drivers not to use rear fog lamps in wet conditions. Indeed, Public information films provided guidance on a variety of issues. Sadly they vanished from our screens a number of years ago.
T.V Public information films used to remind drivers not to use rear fog lamps in wet conditions. Indeed, Public information films provided guidance on a variety of issues. Sadly they vanished from our screens a number of years ago. Peterwalker

5:51pm Tue 22 Jan 13

corfu1985 says...

Whilst on the subject of car drivers,why do so many drive around without lights on in rain & general bad weather?
Anybody would think they were paying for electricity to use their lights,its downright bone idleness,remember even if you can see ok to drive you should be aware of other road users,USE YOUR LIGHTS
Whilst on the subject of car drivers,why do so many drive around without lights on in rain & general bad weather? Anybody would think they were paying for electricity to use their lights,its downright bone idleness,remember even if you can see ok to drive you should be aware of other road users,USE YOUR LIGHTS corfu1985

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