Local Plan document to be opened to the public

Local Plan document to be opened to the public

Local Plan document to be opened to the public

First published in News
Last updated

A MAJOR council document, planning house building and employment land in York for the next 15 years, will open for public consultation in the next step of its progression towards becoming official policy.

Residents will have a chance to put forward their views on specific sites in the Local Plan now that City of York council’s cabinet has approved a draft to be opened up for consultation.

The council now plans to publish consultation documents for the plan within a few months and submit the plan to an planning inspector for final approval in the autumn, after further consultation.

Until the final local plan is approved York council’s own planning policies would carry very little weight if a developer challenged a planning decision at a public inquiry.

But opposition councillors have objected, with the leader of the Conservative group Cllr Chris Stewart saying his party does not accept the level of development planned for York.

The draft also includes controversial suggestions to find around 60 new traveller pitches in the city by compelling housing developers to include traveller sites on their larger developments, or paying for pitches to be built elsewhere.

Comments (2)

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5:20pm Sat 26 Apr 14

What-a-joke-they-are says...

Here we go again

Muppets at the helm!

They didn't listen or respond to any resident feedback from the first 'consultation' and they won't listen to anyone on this one.

The plans for Winthorpe now include almost all of the safeguarded land in the first phase now - with more being allocated for future phases.

York does not need the levels of housing growth provided for in this plan.

We may need significant affordable housing and I won't argue with that as I'm not in a position of knowledge - but the overall numbers are extrapolated from that based on % affordable / normal that they wish to force through.

Some may say 'good riddance' but I'm already looking at moving away from York based on the actions of CyC - and I'll move taking the jobs that my company provides with me.

CYC are trying to attract business and growth - but their actions are making it less attractive to some!

Well done chaps!
Here we go again Muppets at the helm! They didn't listen or respond to any resident feedback from the first 'consultation' and they won't listen to anyone on this one. The plans for Winthorpe now include almost all of the safeguarded land in the first phase now - with more being allocated for future phases. York does not need the levels of housing growth provided for in this plan. We may need significant affordable housing and I won't argue with that as I'm not in a position of knowledge - but the overall numbers are extrapolated from that based on % affordable / normal that they wish to force through. Some may say 'good riddance' but I'm already looking at moving away from York based on the actions of CyC - and I'll move taking the jobs that my company provides with me. CYC are trying to attract business and growth - but their actions are making it less attractive to some! Well done chaps! What-a-joke-they-are
  • Score: -65

4:02am Mon 28 Apr 14

Magicman! says...

I wonder if York residents in the late 1960's kept saying that York "does not need this level of development" when plans were laid out for new areas of housing..?... those areas being the bulk of Haxby and Wigginton, swathes of Huntington, south Strensall, the southern end of Stockton on the Forest, areas around Ashley Park, the whole of Badger Hill, half of Dunnington, a third of Elvington, half of Wheldrake, most of Bishopthorpe, most of Copmanthorpe, a swathe of Acomb and Woodthorpe (including all of Foxwood), part of Rufforth and a large part of Poppleton...
... All those areas were built in the 1970's and expanded the population of York drastically. If you live in a 1970's house in York, you have no right to complain against proposals to build more properties in York - because without that expansion you would not have a house... and by knock-on effect, even if you don't live in a 1970's house, it is because of people who are living in such properties that probably meant you were able to get your own residence - somethat that probably wouldn't have happened if those 1970's houses had not been built because people complained against the developments.
I wonder if York residents in the late 1960's kept saying that York "does not need this level of development" when plans were laid out for new areas of housing..?... those areas being the bulk of Haxby and Wigginton, swathes of Huntington, south Strensall, the southern end of Stockton on the Forest, areas around Ashley Park, the whole of Badger Hill, half of Dunnington, a third of Elvington, half of Wheldrake, most of Bishopthorpe, most of Copmanthorpe, a swathe of Acomb and Woodthorpe (including all of Foxwood), part of Rufforth and a large part of Poppleton... ... All those areas were built in the 1970's and expanded the population of York drastically. If you live in a 1970's house in York, you have no right to complain against proposals to build more properties in York - because without that expansion you would not have a house... and by knock-on effect, even if you don't live in a 1970's house, it is because of people who are living in such properties that probably meant you were able to get your own residence - somethat that probably wouldn't have happened if those 1970's houses had not been built because people complained against the developments. Magicman!
  • Score: 3

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