Drainage investigation launched in York

York Press: The former Our Lady's RC Primary School is being replaced with housing The former Our Lady's RC Primary School is being replaced with housing

AN INVESTIGATION has been launched into claims a new development has caused drainage problems in York.

Last week, The Press reported nature campaigners were concerned by the felling of trees at the former Our Lady’s RC Primary School site in Hob Moor, where plans for a 55-home development were agreed by City of York Council in December.

The site is beside Hob Moor Nature Reserve, and Sue Wherrett, of the Friends of Hob Moor Nature Reserve, said she had been contacted by a resident of Radford House, close to the site.

Sue said: “She told me that in the grounds at the rear of Radford House, large bare clay-like patches have started to appear and the ground seems to be swelling upwards.”

The resident, who is also a member of the Kingsway Area Residents Association, also claimed workmen attending neighbouring Carlton House had found their ladders now sank into the ground.

Sue said: “It is interesting to note that this has never happened before, even in previous persistent torrential downpours, and is arguably the direct result of the removal of a substantial number of mature trees from the side of the site which lies adjacent to both Radford House and Carlton House.

“The area of the Moor around the site is also badly affected, indeed I would go as far as to suggest that if any of the cattle currently grazing on the Moor were to wander into some of the huge pools of standing water adjacent to the site they are in danger of getting stuck in the sticky clay.”

A spokeswoman for City of York Council said an enforcement case had been raised by the authority “to investigate whether there is any breach of planning control”, but could not provide any more information.

The council previously confirmed the trees were not subject to Tree Preservation Orders, and “significant new planting” was planned by developers.

A spokeswoman for Yorkshire Housing, who are developing the site, previously told The Press the trees had been removed from May 19 “as per approved plans”, and was part of work to have the site ready for construction later this year.

Separately last week, the building site at the old school was set alight after being targeted by arsonists. An investigation is continuing.

Comments (5)

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10:33am Tue 10 Jun 14

Grey Lady says...

I hope Yorkshire Housing are going to put things right, I know people who have lived in a shared ownership property, and YH charge the earth for maintenance but are very slow to send someone to fix any problems, so that doesn't bode well in this situation.

If the ground is sodden due to bad drainage, that could compromise the foundations of the existing buildings, and then becomes a health and safety issue.
I hope Yorkshire Housing are going to put things right, I know people who have lived in a shared ownership property, and YH charge the earth for maintenance but are very slow to send someone to fix any problems, so that doesn't bode well in this situation. If the ground is sodden due to bad drainage, that could compromise the foundations of the existing buildings, and then becomes a health and safety issue. Grey Lady
  • Score: 9

11:19am Tue 10 Jun 14

Dave Ruddock says...

as stated above, wounder how long before the Cattle Farmer, Residents and people that use access to Hop Moor find the water raising (like on the Knavesmire). Do Builders know what "Mire" means. Also a Nature Reserve is affected (Council take note) and all to a few houses. Does the old School footprint (Modern jargon) cover the whole housing development or is there any planned extension.. .
as stated above, wounder how long before the Cattle Farmer, Residents and people that use access to Hop Moor find the water raising (like on the Knavesmire). Do Builders know what "Mire" means. Also a Nature Reserve is affected (Council take note) and all to a few houses. Does the old School footprint (Modern jargon) cover the whole housing development or is there any planned extension.. . Dave Ruddock
  • Score: 5

12:19pm Tue 10 Jun 14

Priapus says...

A large mature tree can transpire 40,000 gallons of water a year. Unfortunately, people never bother to consider this when they cut them down
A large mature tree can transpire 40,000 gallons of water a year. Unfortunately, people never bother to consider this when they cut them down Priapus
  • Score: 26

1:23am Wed 11 Jun 14

Badgers Drift says...

Sue said: “She told me that in the grounds at the rear of Radford House, large bare clay-like patches have started to appear and the ground seems to be swelling upwards"


This is called 'heave'.
Removal of trees causes enhanced seasonal movement in the form of shrinkage and swelling of clay soils.
Long–term heave results where a persistent water deficit is
reversed by wetting.

Has the developer (Yorkshire Housing) not commissioned a ground investigation report?
[quote] Sue said: “She told me that in the grounds at the rear of Radford House, large bare clay-like patches have started to appear and the ground seems to be swelling upwards" [/quote] This is called 'heave'. Removal of trees causes enhanced seasonal movement in the form of shrinkage and swelling of clay soils. Long–term heave results where a persistent water deficit is reversed by wetting. Has the developer (Yorkshire Housing) not commissioned a ground investigation report? Badgers Drift
  • Score: -50

9:12am Wed 11 Jun 14

acomblass says...

I despair. Please look and learn from historical records before building on every bit of green space there is. Sometimes areas are left as green spaces for a reason - they cannot be built on because of drainage or former tips or because materials were extracted. Drainage problems in this area are acute and go back for at least the last 40 years. Local knowledge is not being heeded and the builders will pay the price for this. Think why it was that the former swimming baths and the school were built on the sites they were and reflect.
I despair. Please look and learn from historical records before building on every bit of green space there is. Sometimes areas are left as green spaces for a reason - they cannot be built on because of drainage or former tips or because materials were extracted. Drainage problems in this area are acute and go back for at least the last 40 years. Local knowledge is not being heeded and the builders will pay the price for this. Think why it was that the former swimming baths and the school were built on the sites they were and reflect. acomblass
  • Score: 1

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