Couple fear for their Church Fenton home following HS2 route announcement

York Press: David and Rosemary Nattriss examine the route of the proposed line which will put their home at risk. David and Rosemary Nattriss examine the route of the proposed line which will put their home at risk.

A COUPLE have told of their ‘awful shock’ after discovering Britain’s new high-speed rail line is set to run straight through their home.

Pensioners David and Rosemary Nattriss fear their detached house in Common Lane, on the outskirts of Church Fenton, near Tadcaster, would have to be demolished to make way for a rail spur linking York to HS2.

But they said yesterday they had not been told anything by Government officials, and were only alerted when a parish councillor came to their home at 10.45am yesterday and showed them a map of the planned route.

“We are both very upset,” said Mr Nattriss, 85, who was born in the house and has lived there all his life. “We are just in shock at the moment.”

His wife, who has lived there for 42 years and whose pride and joy is the one-acre back garden, said: “It’s an awful shock. It’s a terrible shock.”

She said they might want to sell the house soon to move into something smaller, but now fear the HS2 plans would blight it and make it impossible to sell.

“At 8 o’clock this morning we had a house that was sellable,” she said. “At 10.45, we had a house that wasn’t sellable.”

They said they had not yet begun to think about questions such as compensation, nor did they know with whom to raise such questions.

Parish councillor Stephen Johnson said he believed the line would run through, or very close to four properties in the village, and a public meeting would be organised to enable residents to ask questions and have their say.

Another villager, Martin Blakey, said the line would also run through two six acre fields which had been designated a wildlife habitat, where creatures included kingfishers, deer and water voles.

A Department for Transport spokesman said the Secretary of State for Transport had written yesterday to people owning buildings and/or land considered at risk of having to be acquired as a result of HS2.

He said it was too early to say how many properties would be affected and work would continue to mitigate the route and limit potential blight throughout the design process.

“The Government has also launched a consultation on an Exceptional Hardship Scheme (EHS) for those potentially affected by blight and uncertainty,” he said.

He added that Phase One – the route from London to Birmingham, where the Government was further along the process – was already consulting on a generous package which went above and beyond what was set out in law.

“This includes an advanced and voluntary purchase scheme, a sale and rent back scheme and a hardship scheme. There is no question of compulsorily purchasing any property prior to 2015,” he said.

Comments (10)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:50am Tue 29 Jan 13

bob the builder says...

Scaremongering by any other name - it's a proposed route, not set in stone and hasn't been consulted on. Typical jumping the gun activities you find on parish councils, full of Walter Mittys and nimbys. Given the choice they would go back to villagers toiling in the fields paying tithes to the Lord of Manor while they run the Manorial Court.
Scaremongering by any other name - it's a proposed route, not set in stone and hasn't been consulted on. Typical jumping the gun activities you find on parish councils, full of Walter Mittys and nimbys. Given the choice they would go back to villagers toiling in the fields paying tithes to the Lord of Manor while they run the Manorial Court. bob the builder
  • Score: 0

11:03am Tue 29 Jan 13

myselby says...

they dont have to sell the house that's what the compensation scheme will be for- they will get far more than a normal sale would result in . its sad for them but this event happns all the time with new roads and rail lines
they dont have to sell the house that's what the compensation scheme will be for- they will get far more than a normal sale would result in . its sad for them but this event happns all the time with new roads and rail lines myselby
  • Score: 0

11:56am Tue 29 Jan 13

lezyork1966 says...

I doubt very much they will compensate ppl at full market value.

Even if they do you also have to take into account some people just dont want to move, their houses have gone from bricks and morter to box's of memory's, whats the compensation for that?

If we need the line we need the line, but it should not destroy people memorys
I doubt very much they will compensate ppl at full market value. Even if they do you also have to take into account some people just dont want to move, their houses have gone from bricks and morter to box's of memory's, whats the compensation for that? If we need the line we need the line, but it should not destroy people memorys lezyork1966
  • Score: 0

12:27pm Tue 29 Jan 13

P3TER1 says...

The government have already said people will be given good compensation. Which will be more than market value. This isn't even a news story!
The government have already said people will be given good compensation. Which will be more than market value. This isn't even a news story! P3TER1
  • Score: 0

12:38pm Tue 29 Jan 13

the original Homer says...

In this particular case, the memories and the pride and joy back garden can't be all that important, as the couple "might want to sell the house soon to move into something smaller". I assume "soon" means before any of the proposed plans begin to happen.

Their real concern would seem to be being able to sell the house, although they really mean sell it for the price they'd like. There's no way it's unsellable, it's just the price taht may have gone down (or up).

Whether it has devalued following the plans being announced is unclear. There will be new potential buyers now, who want to gamble on buying it now, to take advantage of the voluntary purchase scheme later. Whilst the current residents might not want the ugliness of bartering with the DoT, others might relish that opportunity.

It's possible the announcement mayhave increased the houses attractiveness to buyers, and pushed the pirce up.
In this particular case, the memories and the pride and joy back garden can't be all that important, as the couple "might want to sell the house soon to move into something smaller". I assume "soon" means before any of the proposed plans begin to happen. Their real concern would seem to be being able to sell the house, although they really mean sell it for the price they'd like. There's no way it's unsellable, it's just the price taht may have gone down (or up). Whether it has devalued following the plans being announced is unclear. There will be new potential buyers now, who want to gamble on buying it now, to take advantage of the voluntary purchase scheme later. Whilst the current residents might not want the ugliness of bartering with the DoT, others might relish that opportunity. It's possible the announcement mayhave increased the houses attractiveness to buyers, and pushed the pirce up. the original Homer
  • Score: 0

1:02pm Tue 29 Jan 13

AngryandFrustrated says...

the original Homer wrote:
In this particular case, the memories and the pride and joy back garden can't be all that important, as the couple "might want to sell the house soon to move into something smaller". I assume "soon" means before any of the proposed plans begin to happen. Their real concern would seem to be being able to sell the house, although they really mean sell it for the price they'd like. There's no way it's unsellable, it's just the price taht may have gone down (or up). Whether it has devalued following the plans being announced is unclear. There will be new potential buyers now, who want to gamble on buying it now, to take advantage of the voluntary purchase scheme later. Whilst the current residents might not want the ugliness of bartering with the DoT, others might relish that opportunity. It's possible the announcement mayhave increased the houses attractiveness to buyers, and pushed the pirce up.
There is no such thing as a "voluntary" purchase scheme - it is a compulsory purchase scheme where the government can throw you out of your home and aquire your land, whether you like it or not. In my experience (and I do have experience of this) people very rarely get what they consider to be full market value for properties that are acquired thru' compulsory purchase schemes. There are always promises that the price offered will be "above the market value" but in real terms, they never are.

Comparable properties, not affected by compulsory purchase soar in value in the location around the scheme area - this is because others living in the area know that their properties could potentially be worth more than the "market value" because of the people looking for replacement homes in the area in which they live. Therefore, whilst they may get "market value", rarely can they afford to relocate to a comparable property in the area they currently live in - because of this, people are often left high and dry and have to relocate out of the immediate area in which they reside.

Because of this, I would be astonished if property speculators move in and try and buy houses that could fall within the compulsory purchase scheme - in any event, properties that fall under this scheme are unmortgageable (as the scheme will show on the local authority search undertaken at purchase) so unless the speculators have a lot of cash sitting in the bank, they would not be able to borrow against them.
[quote][p][bold]the original Homer[/bold] wrote: In this particular case, the memories and the pride and joy back garden can't be all that important, as the couple "might want to sell the house soon to move into something smaller". I assume "soon" means before any of the proposed plans begin to happen. Their real concern would seem to be being able to sell the house, although they really mean sell it for the price they'd like. There's no way it's unsellable, it's just the price taht may have gone down (or up). Whether it has devalued following the plans being announced is unclear. There will be new potential buyers now, who want to gamble on buying it now, to take advantage of the voluntary purchase scheme later. Whilst the current residents might not want the ugliness of bartering with the DoT, others might relish that opportunity. It's possible the announcement mayhave increased the houses attractiveness to buyers, and pushed the pirce up.[/p][/quote]There is no such thing as a "voluntary" purchase scheme - it is a compulsory purchase scheme where the government can throw you out of your home and aquire your land, whether you like it or not. In my experience (and I do have experience of this) people very rarely get what they consider to be full market value for properties that are acquired thru' compulsory purchase schemes. There are always promises that the price offered will be "above the market value" but in real terms, they never are. Comparable properties, not affected by compulsory purchase soar in value in the location around the scheme area - this is because others living in the area know that their properties could potentially be worth more than the "market value" because of the people looking for replacement homes in the area in which they live. Therefore, whilst they may get "market value", rarely can they afford to relocate to a comparable property in the area they currently live in - because of this, people are often left high and dry and have to relocate out of the immediate area in which they reside. Because of this, I would be astonished if property speculators move in and try and buy houses that could fall within the compulsory purchase scheme - in any event, properties that fall under this scheme are unmortgageable (as the scheme will show on the local authority search undertaken at purchase) so unless the speculators have a lot of cash sitting in the bank, they would not be able to borrow against them. AngryandFrustrated
  • Score: 0

3:19pm Tue 29 Jan 13

Rosieposie says...

It's not the when but the if...homes can be blighted for years while various bodies wrangle. This has happened to others elsewhere in the country. Compensation means nothing if you have to wait 5 years for decisions etc
It's not the when but the if...homes can be blighted for years while various bodies wrangle. This has happened to others elsewhere in the country. Compensation means nothing if you have to wait 5 years for decisions etc Rosieposie
  • Score: 0

3:33pm Tue 29 Jan 13

old_geezer says...

Rosieposie's right, the compensation and hardship scheme details are pretty restrictive. Anyone who wants to sell within the next couple of years is in for a hard time - one building society's already valued a house at zero because the proposed line will be within a few hundred metres, so a sale has fallen through.
Rosieposie's right, the compensation and hardship scheme details are pretty restrictive. Anyone who wants to sell within the next couple of years is in for a hard time - one building society's already valued a house at zero because the proposed line will be within a few hundred metres, so a sale has fallen through. old_geezer
  • Score: 0

3:54pm Tue 29 Jan 13

meme says...

CPO orders result generally in higher than market value payments as its easier to settle at a higher figure than going the whole hog to valuation tribunals etc and risking the dealys and costs. This couple will do very well out of it
I do understand CPO orders and I am correct
CPO orders result generally in higher than market value payments as its easier to settle at a higher figure than going the whole hog to valuation tribunals etc and risking the dealys and costs. This couple will do very well out of it I do understand CPO orders and I am correct meme
  • Score: 0

6:38am Wed 30 Jan 13

dodgydavereturns says...

Am I the only one thinking this? And at the risk of sounding controversial, but at 85 there is a good chance of not being here when this is finally passed and starts to be built!
With all respect enjoy the years you have together and don't waste your time worrying about a train line that may or may not arrive at all!
Am I the only one thinking this? And at the risk of sounding controversial, but at 85 there is a good chance of not being here when this is finally passed and starts to be built! With all respect enjoy the years you have together and don't waste your time worrying about a train line that may or may not arrive at all! dodgydavereturns
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree