Blossom Street in York to get revamp

Blossom Street to get revamp

Traffic backs-up in Blossom Street.

Coun Dave Merrett

First published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by , mark.stead@thepress.co.uk

A £200,000 scheme aimed at improving one of the gateways to York will start early next year.

The alterations to Blossom Street are designed to cut down on delays for motorists heading into and out of the city, as well as making the area safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

The programme of work, drawn up by City of York Council, will focus on the area around Blossom Street and Holgate Road and their junctions with The Mount and East Mount Road, with the current traffic lights being replaced by newer versions.

Part of the road surface at the corner of Holgate Road will be resurfaced and the pavement will be widened, while pedestrian crossings will be modernised and cycle feeder lanes will be installed in Blossom Street. Another cycle route will also be introduced in Holgate Road, starting at the iron bridge over the railway line.

The scheme, which is expected to start in February or March and take about four weeks to complete, will also involve building a larger bus shelter outside Reel Cinema in Blossom Street and a new shelter for passengers catching the No.3 and No.4 services. A stop line and traffic signals will be introduced in Holgate Road, near Holgate Villas, with the intention of cutting down on bottlenecks.

The council has said the project will not lead to any car lanes being removed.

Coun Dave Merrett, the council’s cabinet member for city strategy, said: “These works aim to get York moving by improving access to the city for all pedestrians, cyclists, bus passengers and drivers,” said “Evidence shows a more free-flowing city improves York’s business prospects, air quality, safety and quality of life for all.”

A city-wide consultation in 2010 seeking residents’ views on improvements to the junction of Blossom Street, Queen Street, Nunnery Lane and Micklegate saw more than 5,250 people take part, with proposals for removing traffic lanes being rejected. New pedestrian crossings with radar sensors were subsequently installed together with measures to give cyclists turning out of Queen Street into Blossom Street a five-second head-start over other traffic.

Full details of the next phase of work are available at www.york.gov.uk/council/consultations/current/blossomst/

Comments (16)

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8:32am Thu 8 Dec 11

AnotherPointofView says...

Dave Merrett says: “Evidence shows a more free-flowing city improves York’s business prospects, air quality, safety and quality of life for all.”

Is that why we have the silly chicanes along the Huntington Road and Heslington/Main Street in Heslington?

They do nothing but irritate drivers and disrupt traffic flow.
Dave Merrett says: “Evidence shows a more free-flowing city improves York’s business prospects, air quality, safety and quality of life for all.” Is that why we have the silly chicanes along the Huntington Road and Heslington/Main Street in Heslington? They do nothing but irritate drivers and disrupt traffic flow. AnotherPointofView
  • Score: 0

8:43am Thu 8 Dec 11

nearlyman says...

................Get rid of 50% of the traffic lights on all the roads out of York. They are the biggest problem to free flowing traffic in York................
....or just accept that traffic is going to always plague York. I recall 20 odd years ago, the council in its wisdom, spending a fortune on the latest computer traffic control and never seeing the blindest bit of difference or if there were, it probably just encouraged more traffic into York because it seemed clearer !
................Get rid of 50% of the traffic lights on all the roads out of York. They are the biggest problem to free flowing traffic in York................ ....or just accept that traffic is going to always plague York. I recall 20 odd years ago, the council in its wisdom, spending a fortune on the latest computer traffic control and never seeing the blindest bit of difference or if there were, it probably just encouraged more traffic into York because it seemed clearer ! nearlyman
  • Score: 0

8:49am Thu 8 Dec 11

yorkshirelad says...

The design of Blossom Street with it's multiple narrow lanes is just not appropriate. The recent redesign missed an opportunity. The watered down plans even when implemented do not work - where is the yellow box under Micklegate Bar to stop blocking, and the Advanced Cycle Light often doesn't work. More lanes = more traffic = more congestion,.
The design of Blossom Street with it's multiple narrow lanes is just not appropriate. The recent redesign missed an opportunity. The watered down plans even when implemented do not work - where is the yellow box under Micklegate Bar to stop blocking, and the Advanced Cycle Light often doesn't work. More lanes = more traffic = more congestion,. yorkshirelad
  • Score: 0

9:18am Thu 8 Dec 11

pedalling paul says...

nearlyman wrote:
................Get rid of 50% of the traffic lights on all the roads out of York. They are the biggest problem to free flowing traffic in York................

....or just accept that traffic is going to always plague York. I recall 20 odd years ago, the council in its wisdom, spending a fortune on the latest computer traffic control and never seeing the blindest bit of difference or if there were, it probably just encouraged more traffic into York because it seemed clearer !
The UTC (sorry Urban Traffic Control) computer subtly optimises junction capacity without broadcasting the fact that it is doing so. Hence there is no unleashing of suppressed demand as would occur, if more visible measures eg extra lanes were added. Yorkshirelad has hit the nail on the head with this, in his final sentence.
Exiting Queen St right into Blossom St on lane 2 is now fraught for cyclists, as there is now no centre island between Blossom St's inbound and outbound lanes, to deter overtaking of outbound cyclists on the bend. Overtaking drivers then find inbound lane 3 and its "green box" occupied and barge back into outbound lane 2 perilously close to the cyclist they have just overtaken. If a second overtaker is following,the situation is considerably worsened. A strategically situated collapsible bollard would deter this. Thankfully now cyclists turning to the A59 further along have the alternative new route via the railway station, but that is closed overnight.
Chicanes may irritate some drivers but local residents trying to cross the road, particularly those with sensory or mobility restrictions, will be very grateful for measures that deter speeding.
[quote][p][bold]nearlyman[/bold] wrote: ................Get rid of 50% of the traffic lights on all the roads out of York. They are the biggest problem to free flowing traffic in York................ ....or just accept that traffic is going to always plague York. I recall 20 odd years ago, the council in its wisdom, spending a fortune on the latest computer traffic control and never seeing the blindest bit of difference or if there were, it probably just encouraged more traffic into York because it seemed clearer ![/p][/quote]The UTC (sorry Urban Traffic Control) computer subtly optimises junction capacity without broadcasting the fact that it is doing so. Hence there is no unleashing of suppressed demand as would occur, if more visible measures eg extra lanes were added. Yorkshirelad has hit the nail on the head with this, in his final sentence. Exiting Queen St right into Blossom St on lane 2 is now fraught for cyclists, as there is now no centre island between Blossom St's inbound and outbound lanes, to deter overtaking of outbound cyclists on the bend. Overtaking drivers then find inbound lane 3 and its "green box" occupied and barge back into outbound lane 2 perilously close to the cyclist they have just overtaken. If a second overtaker is following,the situation is considerably worsened. A strategically situated collapsible bollard would deter this. Thankfully now cyclists turning to the A59 further along have the alternative new route via the railway station, but that is closed overnight. Chicanes may irritate some drivers but local residents trying to cross the road, particularly those with sensory or mobility restrictions, will be very grateful for measures that deter speeding. pedalling paul
  • Score: 0

9:30am Thu 8 Dec 11

24.2.1969bestcitygoalever... says...

As a frequent visitor to York, what appalls me most is still the so-called 'bypass' A1237 on the left-hand side of the city.

It's still not very good - I almost always regret going on it.

Must drive you locals crackers.

More like a 'trundlepast' than a 'bypass'.

When are you going to do a proper job?
As a frequent visitor to York, what appalls me most is still the so-called 'bypass' A1237 on the left-hand side of the city. It's still not very good - I almost always regret going on it. Must drive you locals crackers. More like a 'trundlepast' than a 'bypass'. When are you going to do a proper job? 24.2.1969bestcitygoalever...
  • Score: 0

9:51am Thu 8 Dec 11

24.2.1969bestcitygoalever... says...

... and then... what HAVE you done to Tadcaster Road? At times unreal lines of traffic out of the city.

Time to replace the road surface with a 'tapis roulant'?
... and then... what HAVE you done to Tadcaster Road? At times unreal lines of traffic out of the city. Time to replace the road surface with a 'tapis roulant'? 24.2.1969bestcitygoalever...
  • Score: 0

10:38am Thu 8 Dec 11

angry ant says...

maybe just maybe if the council stopped taxi drivers using the bus lane on the mount/blossom street then there wouldnt be half as much traffic coming into the city centre. i get the bus lane but can anyone tell me why a taxi should be allowed to change the lights for a few minutes while they go up the inside lane to get back into town quicker and also they have the cheek to try and jump back out of the inside lane if their lights should suddenly go red.A bus with many passengers going into the city fair enough but a taxi that has just dropped a fare off down tadcaster road coming back empty is the same as any other driver driving into the city centre. a BUS lane should be just that....
maybe just maybe if the council stopped taxi drivers using the bus lane on the mount/blossom street then there wouldnt be half as much traffic coming into the city centre. i get the bus lane but can anyone tell me why a taxi should be allowed to change the lights for a few minutes while they go up the inside lane to get back into town quicker and also they have the cheek to try and jump back out of the inside lane if their lights should suddenly go red.A bus with many passengers going into the city fair enough but a taxi that has just dropped a fare off down tadcaster road coming back empty is the same as any other driver driving into the city centre. a BUS lane should be just that.... angry ant
  • Score: 0

11:47am Thu 8 Dec 11

m dee says...

yorkshirelad wrote:
The design of Blossom Street with it's multiple narrow lanes is just not appropriate. The recent redesign missed an opportunity. The watered down plans even when implemented do not work - where is the yellow box under Micklegate Bar to stop blocking, and the Advanced Cycle Light often doesn't work. More lanes = more traffic = more congestion,.
Where does it say more lanes ? at the minute the road is a very tight squeeze for cyclists heading from Holgate road to blossom street, at this point many mount the payment to get passed cars,also coming from Queen street onto Blossom street is always going to be difficult whatever changes were made which is why many sensibly cyclists chose a alternative route.
[quote][p][bold]yorkshirelad[/bold] wrote: The design of Blossom Street with it's multiple narrow lanes is just not appropriate. The recent redesign missed an opportunity. The watered down plans even when implemented do not work - where is the yellow box under Micklegate Bar to stop blocking, and the Advanced Cycle Light often doesn't work. More lanes = more traffic = more congestion,.[/p][/quote]Where does it say more lanes ? at the minute the road is a very tight squeeze for cyclists heading from Holgate road to blossom street, at this point many mount the payment to get passed cars,also coming from Queen street onto Blossom street is always going to be difficult whatever changes were made which is why many sensibly cyclists chose a alternative route. m dee
  • Score: 0

11:59am Thu 8 Dec 11

Eric Style says...

If they can pee £200k up the wall for a junction that was redesigned within the last year then why not chuck some cash at a new sports stadium!
If they can pee £200k up the wall for a junction that was redesigned within the last year then why not chuck some cash at a new sports stadium! Eric Style
  • Score: 0

12:04pm Thu 8 Dec 11

yorkshirelad says...

m dee wrote:
yorkshirelad wrote:
The design of Blossom Street with it's multiple narrow lanes is just not appropriate. The recent redesign missed an opportunity. The watered down plans even when implemented do not work - where is the yellow box under Micklegate Bar to stop blocking, and the Advanced Cycle Light often doesn't work. More lanes = more traffic = more congestion,.
Where does it say more lanes ? at the minute the road is a very tight squeeze for cyclists heading from Holgate road to blossom street, at this point many mount the payment to get passed cars,also coming from Queen street onto Blossom street is always going to be difficult whatever changes were made which is why many sensibly cyclists chose a alternative route.
The original plans contained options to remove car lanes but of course these were rejected in favour of keeping current lanes. Hence my 'more lanes' comment. Reducing lanes here could have hugely increased safety at very little cost to traffic delays.
[quote][p][bold]m dee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yorkshirelad[/bold] wrote: The design of Blossom Street with it's multiple narrow lanes is just not appropriate. The recent redesign missed an opportunity. The watered down plans even when implemented do not work - where is the yellow box under Micklegate Bar to stop blocking, and the Advanced Cycle Light often doesn't work. More lanes = more traffic = more congestion,.[/p][/quote]Where does it say more lanes ? at the minute the road is a very tight squeeze for cyclists heading from Holgate road to blossom street, at this point many mount the payment to get passed cars,also coming from Queen street onto Blossom street is always going to be difficult whatever changes were made which is why many sensibly cyclists chose a alternative route.[/p][/quote]The original plans contained options to remove car lanes but of course these were rejected in favour of keeping current lanes. Hence my 'more lanes' comment. Reducing lanes here could have hugely increased safety at very little cost to traffic delays. yorkshirelad
  • Score: 0

12:27pm Thu 8 Dec 11

Von_Dutch says...

Eric Style wrote:
If they can pee £200k up the wall for a junction that was redesigned within the last year then why not chuck some cash at a new sports stadium!
Firstly, it was the Micklegate junction which was redesigned last year, not this one - this one's at the other end of Blossom St with its junction with Holgate Rd.
Secondly, another £200K HAS just been chucked at the new stadium. And you can't just use money for transport improvements elsewhere. Anyone who knows local governments knows that budgets are ringfenced.
[quote][p][bold]Eric Style[/bold] wrote: If they can pee £200k up the wall for a junction that was redesigned within the last year then why not chuck some cash at a new sports stadium![/p][/quote]Firstly, it was the Micklegate junction which was redesigned last year, not this one - this one's at the other end of Blossom St with its junction with Holgate Rd. Secondly, another £200K HAS just been chucked at the new stadium. And you can't just use money for transport improvements elsewhere. Anyone who knows local governments knows that budgets are ringfenced. Von_Dutch
  • Score: 0

12:30pm Thu 8 Dec 11

Von_Dutch says...

The confusion probably lies with The Press's usual lazy journalism - using a picture of the wrong junction - and not only that but using an old picture of it, pre last years changes...
The confusion probably lies with The Press's usual lazy journalism - using a picture of the wrong junction - and not only that but using an old picture of it, pre last years changes... Von_Dutch
  • Score: 0

12:39pm Thu 8 Dec 11

anonyork says...

The alterations to the Blossom Street/Nunnery Lane/Micklegate/Quee
n St are a complete farce! Try crossing the road from the Bar Convent side of the road to the opposite side (the widest bit of road, now with no traffic islands). It's fine if you can sprint across but walking at a normal pace will result in being still in the road when the lights change to red! Also, when you start to cross you can't see (or hear) whether the lights are green or red for pedestrians. It's an accident waiting to happen!
The alterations to the Blossom Street/Nunnery Lane/Micklegate/Quee n St are a complete farce! Try crossing the road from the Bar Convent side of the road to the opposite side (the widest bit of road, now with no traffic islands). It's fine if you can sprint across but walking at a normal pace will result in being still in the road when the lights change to red! Also, when you start to cross you can't see (or hear) whether the lights are green or red for pedestrians. It's an accident waiting to happen! anonyork
  • Score: 0

1:34pm Thu 8 Dec 11

DEKKA says...

anonyork wrote:
The alterations to the Blossom Street/Nunnery Lane/Micklegate/Quee n St are a complete farce! Try crossing the road from the Bar Convent side of the road to the opposite side (the widest bit of road, now with no traffic islands). It's fine if you can sprint across but walking at a normal pace will result in being still in the road when the lights change to red! Also, when you start to cross you can't see (or hear) whether the lights are green or red for pedestrians. It's an accident waiting to happen!
Couldn't agree more. The removal of the central islands has made this junction extremely dangerous, depite the councils continual claims that having to sprint across the roads has made it safer. Car, Buses and taxis ignore red lights and the '5 second' advance green for cyclists coming out of Queens Street never works. Buses have to stop somewhere but having upto 3 buses (FTRs and P&R) stopping on Blossom Street just clogs up the outward route. God help us if the 'improvements' to the Holgate junction go ahead.
[quote][p][bold]anonyork[/bold] wrote: The alterations to the Blossom Street/Nunnery Lane/Micklegate/Quee n St are a complete farce! Try crossing the road from the Bar Convent side of the road to the opposite side (the widest bit of road, now with no traffic islands). It's fine if you can sprint across but walking at a normal pace will result in being still in the road when the lights change to red! Also, when you start to cross you can't see (or hear) whether the lights are green or red for pedestrians. It's an accident waiting to happen![/p][/quote]Couldn't agree more. The removal of the central islands has made this junction extremely dangerous, depite the councils continual claims that having to sprint across the roads has made it safer. Car, Buses and taxis ignore red lights and the '5 second' advance green for cyclists coming out of Queens Street never works. Buses have to stop somewhere but having upto 3 buses (FTRs and P&R) stopping on Blossom Street just clogs up the outward route. God help us if the 'improvements' to the Holgate junction go ahead. DEKKA
  • Score: 0

4:44pm Thu 8 Dec 11

york_chap says...

It's a shame there can't be a green man on Blossom Street - never corssed there before but it looks pretty difficult.
As for the 3 lanes on Blossom street, reducing these to two would, contrary to some posters' opinions, dramatically increase congestion. How do I know? I've been past there on many occasions when lorries are parked blocking 1 lane while delivering to the bars/hotels along there. The queues for the lights back up a LOT further than when all 3 lanes are available.
It's a shame there can't be a green man on Blossom Street - never corssed there before but it looks pretty difficult. As for the 3 lanes on Blossom street, reducing these to two would, contrary to some posters' opinions, dramatically increase congestion. How do I know? I've been past there on many occasions when lorries are parked blocking 1 lane while delivering to the bars/hotels along there. The queues for the lights back up a LOT further than when all 3 lanes are available. york_chap
  • Score: 0

2:43am Sun 11 Dec 11

Magicman! says...

New pedestrian crossings with radar sensors were subsequently installed together with measures to give cyclists turning out of Queen Street into Blossom Street a five-second head-start over other traffic.

The radar sensors just mean the pedestrian phase is on for much longer, and anybody stepping out even after the red man has come on just delays the traffic from getting a green light - so the whole junction is now at a standstaill for longer than it was before.
The green cycle light doesn't work 90% of the time, and where is the yellow box under micklegate bar to stop motorists blocking the cycle lane??
[quote]New pedestrian crossings with radar sensors were subsequently installed together with measures to give cyclists turning out of Queen Street into Blossom Street a five-second head-start over other traffic.[/quote] The radar sensors just mean the pedestrian phase is on for much longer, and anybody stepping out even after the red man has come on just delays the traffic from getting a green light - so the whole junction is now at a standstaill for longer than it was before. The green cycle light doesn't work 90% of the time, and where is the yellow box under micklegate bar to stop motorists blocking the cycle lane?? Magicman!
  • Score: 0

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