University of York's 'gulf' between student numbers and amount of accommodation

First published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

NEW figures have revealed the growing gulf between the number of University of York students and the amount of accommodation provided on campus.

The figures, obtained from the university by Osbaldwick Parish Council under the Freedom of Information Act, show in 1999/2000 there were 8,525 students and 3,100 bed spaces on campus.

But by 2009/10, the number of students had grown to 13,908, while the number of bed spaces had grown only to 4,679.

The university also said student numbers were set to rise by another 5,400 through the current Heslington East expansion, but with 3,300 extra bed spaces to be created.

The figures emerged after City of York Council took further steps to reduce the growing number of houses in multiple occupation (HMOs), many of which are student lets.

Three separate HMO applications, for Millfield Lane, Thief Lane and Low Mill Close, have all been refused permission by the east area planning committee following residents’ objections – despite officers recommending approval for two of the schemes.

Osbaldwick parish chairman Mark Warters said today the new powers to control HMOs were welcome, and the university figures proved what people in east York has long suspected – that student numbers had been growing far faster than the increase in campus accommodation.

He claimed the rise in student lets was increasing pressure for housing growth on green belt sites, such as land at Osbaldwick where the 540-home Derwenthorpe scheme was planned.

A university spokesman said the figures related to the total numbers of students, a proportion of whom were distance learners or local residents doing part-time or evening courses and therefore living at home.

“In any event, we cannot compel students to live on campus,” he said.

“Nevertheless, over the last five years the number of bed spaces that we are providing has increased by more than 37 per cent. In the last three years alone we have provided nearly 1,000 additional bed spaces. We have also spent £5 million refurbishing our existing student accommodation.”

He said a new college planned for Heslington East would have more than 600 beds and feature a range of social and welfare facilities.

Comments (32)

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10:47am Tue 17 Aug 10

josephheller says...

"growing far faster than the increase in campus accommodation" < could have found that out from the Uni website rather than by FoI requests.

There's only two things the Osbaldwick residents want:
-some by-law compelling students to live on campus (and a unrealistically large investment in new halls)
-a freeze on student numbers

Who's this going to help? Lighten up guys.

All this HMO blocks are just petty-mindedness. Students don't want to take over the place, just have a place to live like everyone else.
"growing far faster than the increase in campus accommodation" < could have found that out from the Uni website rather than by FoI requests. There's only two things the Osbaldwick residents want: -some by-law compelling students to live on campus (and a unrealistically large investment in new halls) -a freeze on student numbers Who's this going to help? Lighten up guys. All this HMO blocks are just petty-mindedness. Students don't want to take over the place, just have a place to live like everyone else. josephheller
  • Score: 0

11:23am Tue 17 Aug 10

Ben Guela says...

Let them sleep in tents!
Let them sleep in tents! Ben Guela
  • Score: 0

11:28am Tue 17 Aug 10

Pedro says...

First. I never went to university, but students are generally OK. Some are still children and therefore not ready for the adult world, but they are no more problems than the stag-and-hen rabble that the city milks every weekend.

When the Law College opened nearby I wondered whether the area would suffer. But it hasn't. So special praise to the students who attend.
First. I never went to university, but students are generally OK. Some are still children and therefore not ready for the adult world, but they are no more problems than the stag-and-hen rabble that the city milks every weekend. When the Law College opened nearby I wondered whether the area would suffer. But it hasn't. So special praise to the students who attend. Pedro
  • Score: 0

11:48am Tue 17 Aug 10

Guy Fawkes says...

For a redbrick like York, a third living in halls, a third in private HMOs nearby and a third doing something else (distance learning / at home with parents / mature students etc.) is pretty typical. From the figures in the story, it looks like the halls have been scaled up to meet the expansion, but that little or no thought was given to the extra students who'd be living off campus.

I'm not convinced that increasing the proportion of students in halls is the answer, either from a social or an economic perspective. Part of the reason for going to university is for these kids to learn to live in the real world, and so the time honoured ritual of spending year 1 in halls and years 2 and 3 in private rented seems to me to be a sound one. Furthermore, students in halls tend to spend less money in the local economy (i.e. they'll spend more in on-campus shops and amenities). And when, as simple demographics dictate, student populations decline, there will be lots of HMOs lying empty and run-down.

This is basically a short-term problem, albeit a serious one for the York suburbs situated around the campus.
For a redbrick like York, a third living in halls, a third in private HMOs nearby and a third doing something else (distance learning / at home with parents / mature students etc.) is pretty typical. From the figures in the story, it looks like the halls have been scaled up to meet the expansion, but that little or no thought was given to the extra students who'd be living off campus. I'm not convinced that increasing the proportion of students in halls is the answer, either from a social or an economic perspective. Part of the reason for going to university is for these kids to learn to live in the real world, and so the time honoured ritual of spending year 1 in halls and years 2 and 3 in private rented seems to me to be a sound one. Furthermore, students in halls tend to spend less money in the local economy (i.e. they'll spend more in on-campus shops and amenities). And when, as simple demographics dictate, student populations decline, there will be lots of HMOs lying empty and run-down. This is basically a short-term problem, albeit a serious one for the York suburbs situated around the campus. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

12:54pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

The University are greedy lowlifes who are not interested about the local community only how much they can get in in tuition fees. They don't even care about the students themselves. They invite people to our city from all over the country and the world and expect the people of York to step aside so they can live in houses which were built for York people, such as first time buyers, young couples etc who now cannot get a foothold on the housing ladder. The University should be cut in size significantly and for every student they cannot accommodate they should be fined.
The University are greedy lowlifes who are not interested about the local community only how much they can get in in tuition fees. They don't even care about the students themselves. They invite people to our city from all over the country and the world and expect the people of York to step aside so they can live in houses which were built for York people, such as first time buyers, young couples etc who now cannot get a foothold on the housing ladder. The University should be cut in size significantly and for every student they cannot accommodate they should be fined. Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

1:13pm Tue 17 Aug 10

MLewisW says...

Phantom1974, you are ridiculous. Not everybody who lives in York was born in York, student or not. The people who build houses build them so they can sell them to the highest bidder, not through sentimentality toward locals. Please, get off your xenophobic horse and enter the real world.

The students, particularly when the tourists have left in the winter months, are the people who support York's economy. Having more of them, with high disposable incomes, is of real benefit to the city.

From my experience, the university is lacking in accommodation, especially for 'home' postgraduate students (unless you are international, you cannot get university accommodation as a postgraduate). But this is well catered for by private sector renting.

Most students cause little noise and are gone after a year if they do. Some families can move into properties for life, be rowdy, and face no objection from the likes of Phantom1974, purely because they are hallowed LOCALS -and presumably more normal?! Students not having enough houses to move into is neither helped by local objections to planning applications for student dwellings, thus creating further tension.

Please, at the least, reconsider how many people in York were born in York. Few, I suspect.
Phantom1974, you are ridiculous. Not everybody who lives in York was born in York, student or not. The people who build houses build them so they can sell them to the highest bidder, not through sentimentality toward locals. Please, get off your xenophobic horse and enter the real world. The students, particularly when the tourists have left in the winter months, are the people who support York's economy. Having more of them, with high disposable incomes, is of real benefit to the city. From my experience, the university is lacking in accommodation, especially for 'home' postgraduate students (unless you are international, you cannot get university accommodation as a postgraduate). But this is well catered for by private sector renting. Most students cause little noise and are gone after a year if they do. Some families can move into properties for life, be rowdy, and face no objection from the likes of Phantom1974, purely because they are hallowed LOCALS -and presumably more normal?! Students not having enough houses to move into is neither helped by local objections to planning applications for student dwellings, thus creating further tension. Please, at the least, reconsider how many people in York were born in York. Few, I suspect. MLewisW
  • Score: 0

1:17pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Guy Fawkes says...

Universities did not cause the house price bubble, and it's those same 'York people' you portray as victims who decided to convert their houses into HMOs and then rent them to students. And as for increasing student numbers, they simply did what the last government told them to do when it set the 50% participation target.

The University of York employs 3,091 FTEs (according to its last annual report), and at least as many jobs again probably depend on it. If, as you are demanding, it is 'cut in size significantly', I take it you'd have no problem with several thousands jobs in the city being cut along with it?
Universities did not cause the house price bubble, and it's those same 'York people' you portray as victims who decided to convert their houses into HMOs and then rent them to students. And as for increasing student numbers, they simply did what the last government told them to do when it set the 50% participation target. The University of York employs 3,091 FTEs (according to its last annual report), and at least as many jobs again probably depend on it. If, as you are demanding, it is 'cut in size significantly', I take it you'd have no problem with several thousands jobs in the city being cut along with it? Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

No, I'd have no problem with that because how many of those jobs do York people do? The University wants York people as cleaners and porters, hardly good jobs are they? All the decent posts are held by people who have come in from outside.
No, I'd have no problem with that because how many of those jobs do York people do? The University wants York people as cleaners and porters, hardly good jobs are they? All the decent posts are held by people who have come in from outside. Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

1:37pm Tue 17 Aug 10

MLewisW says...

So why don't you apply for one of these other jobs, Phantom1974? Any large business in York will source people at both national and even international levels. Again, we are not in some 1700s society where social mobility is out of the question and only locals apply for jobs - people move in-and-out of York for work and that will never change. If local people don't have the qualifications, it's their fault, not the university's (or other large business).
So why don't you apply for one of these other jobs, Phantom1974? Any large business in York will source people at both national and even international levels. Again, we are not in some 1700s society where social mobility is out of the question and only locals apply for jobs - people move in-and-out of York for work and that will never change. If local people don't have the qualifications, it's their fault, not the university's (or other large business). MLewisW
  • Score: 0

1:41pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

That's true, but then the argument is that we should care about the loss of jobs - no we shouldn't as it's not the people of York being made redundant. I wouldn't apply for one of those jobs, despite having extensive qualifications, because I want to work in the real world, not in a bubble where I spend my life pretending to be a student.
That's true, but then the argument is that we should care about the loss of jobs - no we shouldn't as it's not the people of York being made redundant. I wouldn't apply for one of those jobs, despite having extensive qualifications, because I want to work in the real world, not in a bubble where I spend my life pretending to be a student. Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

1:46pm Tue 17 Aug 10

MLewisW says...

We should care because they are humans with families, like you and I. Just because they are not local doesn't mean we shouldn't care.
So having a 9-5 research and lecturing job where you pay the same taxes as everyone in your so-called 'real world' and have to take a lot of work home isn't the 'real world'? Please, define 'real world'.
We should care because they are humans with families, like you and I. Just because they are not local doesn't mean we shouldn't care. So having a 9-5 research and lecturing job where you pay the same taxes as everyone in your so-called 'real world' and have to take a lot of work home isn't the 'real world'? Please, define 'real world'. MLewisW
  • Score: 0

1:50pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

No, we shouldn't care if they have to be sacrificed to protect the infrastructure of the city for local people. After all, if they are as talented as you claim, they will simply walk into the next job. York people should be the priority in York, as they are the people who built the city for these incoming residents to enjoy in the first place.
No, we shouldn't care if they have to be sacrificed to protect the infrastructure of the city for local people. After all, if they are as talented as you claim, they will simply walk into the next job. York people should be the priority in York, as they are the people who built the city for these incoming residents to enjoy in the first place. Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

2:01pm Tue 17 Aug 10

AdmiralNN says...

despite having extensive qualifications

'
I sincerely doubt it.
[quote]despite having extensive qualifications [/quote] ' I sincerely doubt it. AdmiralNN
  • Score: 0

2:04pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

AdmiralNN wrote:
despite having extensive qualifications
' I sincerely doubt it.
Why? Have I made a mess of the punctuation in a quotation when I was trying to make myself sound clever? Oh no, that was you!
[quote][p][bold]AdmiralNN[/bold] wrote: [quote]despite having extensive qualifications [/quote] ' I sincerely doubt it.[/p][/quote]Why? Have I made a mess of the punctuation in a quotation when I was trying to make myself sound clever? Oh no, that was you! Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

2:27pm Tue 17 Aug 10

AdmiralNN says...

Phantom1974 wrote:
AdmiralNN wrote:
despite having extensive qualifications
' I sincerely doubt it.
Why? Have I made a mess of the punctuation in a quotation when I was trying to make myself sound clever? Oh no, that was you!
No. But with such a level of narrow mindedness and short sightedness then i doubt that you are as 'extensively' educated as you claim.
'
And who boasts about extensive qualifications on a local paper forum - the man who has none i suspect.
[quote][p][bold]Phantom1974[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AdmiralNN[/bold] wrote: [quote]despite having extensive qualifications [/quote] ' I sincerely doubt it.[/p][/quote]Why? Have I made a mess of the punctuation in a quotation when I was trying to make myself sound clever? Oh no, that was you![/p][/quote]No. But with such a level of narrow mindedness and short sightedness then i doubt that you are as 'extensively' educated as you claim. ' And who boasts about extensive qualifications on a local paper forum - the man who has none i suspect. AdmiralNN
  • Score: 0

2:33pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

AdmiralNN wrote:
Phantom1974 wrote:
AdmiralNN wrote:
despite having extensive qualifications
' I sincerely doubt it.
Why? Have I made a mess of the punctuation in a quotation when I was trying to make myself sound clever? Oh no, that was you!
No. But with such a level of narrow mindedness and short sightedness then i doubt that you are as 'extensively' educated as you claim. ' And who boasts about extensive qualifications on a local paper forum - the man who has none i suspect.
Who is boasting? I was simply giving a straight answer to a question. You can call my opinions, which are held by many people in York, "narrow-minded", "short-sighted" or whatever you want but I am not the one inviting young people here promising them a bright future knowing that they don't even have anywhere to live. That is "short-sighted" and bordering on the immoral.
[quote][p][bold]AdmiralNN[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Phantom1974[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AdmiralNN[/bold] wrote: [quote]despite having extensive qualifications [/quote] ' I sincerely doubt it.[/p][/quote]Why? Have I made a mess of the punctuation in a quotation when I was trying to make myself sound clever? Oh no, that was you![/p][/quote]No. But with such a level of narrow mindedness and short sightedness then i doubt that you are as 'extensively' educated as you claim. ' And who boasts about extensive qualifications on a local paper forum - the man who has none i suspect.[/p][/quote]Who is boasting? I was simply giving a straight answer to a question. You can call my opinions, which are held by many people in York, "narrow-minded", "short-sighted" or whatever you want but I am not the one inviting young people here promising them a bright future knowing that they don't even have anywhere to live. That is "short-sighted" and bordering on the immoral. Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

2:42pm Tue 17 Aug 10

AdmiralNN says...

Ultimately if you took everything out of york that wasnt manufactured, produced or born here do you think it will be a happy place?
'
Also just for clarification whats your definition of local people?
Ultimately if you took everything out of york that wasnt manufactured, produced or born here do you think it will be a happy place? ' Also just for clarification whats your definition of local people? AdmiralNN
  • Score: 0

2:47pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Phantom1974 says...

AdmiralNN wrote:
Ultimately if you took everything out of york that wasnt manufactured, produced or born here do you think it will be a happy place? ' Also just for clarification whats your definition of local people?
There is a big difference between getting rid of things that you describe as from "out of York", which would be nonsensical, and making those things dominate above the needs, health and interests of the people of York even to their detriment, as in the case of York University.
[quote][p][bold]AdmiralNN[/bold] wrote: Ultimately if you took everything out of york that wasnt manufactured, produced or born here do you think it will be a happy place? ' Also just for clarification whats your definition of local people?[/p][/quote]There is a big difference between getting rid of things that you describe as from "out of York", which would be nonsensical, and making those things dominate above the needs, health and interests of the people of York even to their detriment, as in the case of York University. Phantom1974
  • Score: 0

2:50pm Tue 17 Aug 10

AdmiralNN says...

Phantom1974 wrote:
AdmiralNN wrote: Ultimately if you took everything out of york that wasnt manufactured, produced or born here do you think it will be a happy place? ' Also just for clarification whats your definition of local people?
There is a big difference between getting rid of things that you describe as from "out of York", which would be nonsensical, and making those things dominate above the needs, health and interests of the people of York even to their detriment, as in the case of York University.
who are the people of York? whats your definition?
[quote][p][bold]Phantom1974[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AdmiralNN[/bold] wrote: Ultimately if you took everything out of york that wasnt manufactured, produced or born here do you think it will be a happy place? ' Also just for clarification whats your definition of local people?[/p][/quote]There is a big difference between getting rid of things that you describe as from "out of York", which would be nonsensical, and making those things dominate above the needs, health and interests of the people of York even to their detriment, as in the case of York University.[/p][/quote]who are the people of York? whats your definition? AdmiralNN
  • Score: 0

2:50pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Guy Fawkes says...

The one thing I agree with Phantom about is that the lack of accommodation overall (i.e. taking both UoY-provided and private sector) relative to the planned increase in student numbers is a problem that should have been foreseen and should not have been allowed to happen. Furthermore, as someone who has studied at and worked at universities other than York, I can assure you that this is not unique to York. The rapid expansion in UG numbers in institutions across the country has created this problem in lots of cities. It was precipitated by Tony Blair's arbitrary decision that 50% of school leavers should go to university, which also invoked the law of unintended consequences in lots of other ways.
However, as MLewisW points out, the idea that some sort of privileged status should be accorded to people who are born in one town or city and never leave, and that any 'outsider' who dares to move in should be led up a hill and introduced to the wicker man, is one best left in the 1970s. Like it or not, intra-UK migration is here to stay: and even if a lot of the senior academics and managers at the UoY have arrived here by this route, they pay their council tax here, they spend money in the local economy and most of them try to integrate socially. If Phantom were offered his dream job in Sussex or Cornwall, would he/she tell them where to stick it?
The one thing I agree with Phantom about is that the lack of accommodation overall (i.e. taking both UoY-provided and private sector) relative to the planned increase in student numbers is a problem that should have been foreseen and should not have been allowed to happen. Furthermore, as someone who has studied at and worked at universities other than York, I can assure you that this is not unique to York. The rapid expansion in UG numbers in institutions across the country has created this problem in lots of cities. It was precipitated by Tony Blair's arbitrary decision that 50% of school leavers should go to university, which also invoked the law of unintended consequences in lots of other ways. However, as MLewisW points out, the idea that some sort of privileged status should be accorded to people who are born in one town or city and never leave, and that any 'outsider' who dares to move in should be led up a hill and introduced to the wicker man, is one best left in the 1970s. Like it or not, intra-UK migration is here to stay: and even if a lot of the senior academics and managers at the UoY have arrived here by this route, they pay their council tax here, they spend money in the local economy and most of them try to integrate socially. If Phantom were offered his dream job in Sussex or Cornwall, would he/she tell them where to stick it? Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

4:15pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Get-a-grip says...

The rapid expansion in UG numbers in institutions across the country has created this problem in lots of cities. It was precipitated by Tony Blair's arbitrary decision that 50% of school leavers should go to university, which also invoked the law of unintended consequences in lots of other ways.

I'm sure this is correct
[quote] The rapid expansion in UG numbers in institutions across the country has created this problem in lots of cities. It was precipitated by Tony Blair's arbitrary decision that 50% of school leavers should go to university, which also invoked the law of unintended consequences in lots of other ways.[/quote] I'm sure this is correct Get-a-grip
  • Score: 0

4:29pm Tue 17 Aug 10

intelligentviews says...

The universities are a plus for York and the students are far better behaved than some young people from particular areas of York. As for housing, many a local makes relatively easy money out of letting rooms in their own homes or letting out houses.
The universities are a plus for York and the students are far better behaved than some young people from particular areas of York. As for housing, many a local makes relatively easy money out of letting rooms in their own homes or letting out houses. intelligentviews
  • Score: 0

4:44pm Tue 17 Aug 10

the butler says...

In case it is not known, one of York's
factories, leases or builds accommodation to suit, don't moan about the lack of the same.
In case it is not known, one of York's factories, leases or builds accommodation to suit, don't moan about the lack of the same. the butler
  • Score: 0

5:09pm Tue 17 Aug 10

meme says...

Why do people in York complain about students and York University?
Both are vital to the financial economics of york in lots of ways both big and samll. There are some issues like any big University town but not many given the numbers and size of this institution.
In general i welcome every student local,national and international. I certainly welcome the University and the huge beneficial impact it has on the city and its wealth as well as its image
If it were not for them we would be a poorer place both financially and intellectually and its ttime we woke up and realised how important it is to our great city
There are always moaners........Somet
imes I am one of them but dont let that blinker our vison of the greater good
Why do people in York complain about students and York University? Both are vital to the financial economics of york in lots of ways both big and samll. There are some issues like any big University town but not many given the numbers and size of this institution. In general i welcome every student local,national and international. I certainly welcome the University and the huge beneficial impact it has on the city and its wealth as well as its image If it were not for them we would be a poorer place both financially and intellectually [not sure I spelt that correctly!] and its ttime we woke up and realised how important it is to our great city There are always moaners........Somet imes I am one of them but dont let that blinker our vison of the greater good meme
  • Score: 0

8:10pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Jassy says...

phantom needs help.
phantom needs help. Jassy
  • Score: 0

9:13pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Hackney Lee says...

Guy Fawkes wrote:
For a redbrick like York, a third living in halls, a third in private HMOs nearby and a third doing something else (distance learning / at home with parents / mature students etc.) is pretty typical. From the figures in the story, it looks like the halls have been scaled up to meet the expansion, but that little or no thought was given to the extra students who'd be living off campus.

I'm not convinced that increasing the proportion of students in halls is the answer, either from a social or an economic perspective. Part of the reason for going to university is for these kids to learn to live in the real world, and so the time honoured ritual of spending year 1 in halls and years 2 and 3 in private rented seems to me to be a sound one. Furthermore, students in halls tend to spend less money in the local economy (i.e. they'll spend more in on-campus shops and amenities). And when, as simple demographics dictate, student populations decline, there will be lots of HMOs lying empty and run-down.

This is basically a short-term problem, albeit a serious one for the York suburbs situated around the campus.
I know it makes no difference to this problem but is York a redbrick university? Not sure it is
[quote][p][bold]Guy Fawkes[/bold] wrote: For a redbrick like York, a third living in halls, a third in private HMOs nearby and a third doing something else (distance learning / at home with parents / mature students etc.) is pretty typical. From the figures in the story, it looks like the halls have been scaled up to meet the expansion, but that little or no thought was given to the extra students who'd be living off campus. I'm not convinced that increasing the proportion of students in halls is the answer, either from a social or an economic perspective. Part of the reason for going to university is for these kids to learn to live in the real world, and so the time honoured ritual of spending year 1 in halls and years 2 and 3 in private rented seems to me to be a sound one. Furthermore, students in halls tend to spend less money in the local economy (i.e. they'll spend more in on-campus shops and amenities). And when, as simple demographics dictate, student populations decline, there will be lots of HMOs lying empty and run-down. This is basically a short-term problem, albeit a serious one for the York suburbs situated around the campus.[/p][/quote]I know it makes no difference to this problem but is York a redbrick university? Not sure it is Hackney Lee
  • Score: 0

9:58pm Tue 17 Aug 10

Get-a-grip says...

Not a Redbrick, it's a Plateglass university.
Not a Redbrick, it's a Plateglass university. Get-a-grip
  • Score: 0

9:15am Wed 18 Aug 10

York Fox says...

Get-a-grip wrote:
Not a Redbrick, it's a Plateglass university.
Correcto.
[quote][p][bold]Get-a-grip[/bold] wrote: Not a Redbrick, it's a Plateglass university.[/p][/quote]Correcto. York Fox
  • Score: 0

1:06pm Wed 18 Aug 10

areyouhavingalaugh? says...

The coalition government have decided to scrap the requirement for 'change of use' permission for family homes being converted into HMO's from October. So the NIMBY councillors and residents of Badger Hill, Heslington and Osbaldwick will have the smile wiped of their smug faces. No well researched evidence base for these decisions, just subjective anti-student discrimination and more fool their idiot councillors for listening to them.
The coalition government have decided to scrap the requirement for 'change of use' permission for family homes being converted into HMO's from October. So the NIMBY councillors and residents of Badger Hill, Heslington and Osbaldwick will have the smile wiped of their smug faces. No well researched evidence base for these decisions, just subjective anti-student discrimination and more fool their idiot councillors for listening to them. areyouhavingalaugh?
  • Score: 0

2:33pm Wed 18 Aug 10

meme says...

The coalition government have decided to scrap the requirement for 'change of use' permission for family homes being converted into HMO's from October. So the NIMBY councillors and residents of Badger Hill, Heslington and Osbaldwick will have the smile wiped of their smug faces. No well researched evidence base for these decisions, just subjective anti-student discrimination and more fool their idiot councillors for listening to them.
HEAR, HEAR THIS WAS DESCRIMINATION AT ITS WORST
The coalition government have decided to scrap the requirement for 'change of use' permission for family homes being converted into HMO's from October. So the NIMBY councillors and residents of Badger Hill, Heslington and Osbaldwick will have the smile wiped of their smug faces. No well researched evidence base for these decisions, just subjective anti-student discrimination and more fool their idiot councillors for listening to them. HEAR, HEAR THIS WAS DESCRIMINATION AT ITS WORST meme
  • Score: 0

8:33pm Wed 18 Aug 10

E=MC^2 says...

Hackney Lee wrote:
Guy Fawkes wrote: For a redbrick like York, a third living in halls, a third in private HMOs nearby and a third doing something else (distance learning / at home with parents / mature students etc.) is pretty typical. From the figures in the story, it looks like the halls have been scaled up to meet the expansion, but that little or no thought was given to the extra students who'd be living off campus. I'm not convinced that increasing the proportion of students in halls is the answer, either from a social or an economic perspective. Part of the reason for going to university is for these kids to learn to live in the real world, and so the time honoured ritual of spending year 1 in halls and years 2 and 3 in private rented seems to me to be a sound one. Furthermore, students in halls tend to spend less money in the local economy (i.e. they'll spend more in on-campus shops and amenities). And when, as simple demographics dictate, student populations decline, there will be lots of HMOs lying empty and run-down. This is basically a short-term problem, albeit a serious one for the York suburbs situated around the campus.
I know it makes no difference to this problem but is York a redbrick university? Not sure it is
Founded in early 60's York isn't a red brick. The term refers to one founded in the 19c or 1st half 20c. Bit surprised at GF not getting this right what with him having had a university education and working in 1.
[quote][p][bold]Hackney Lee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Guy Fawkes[/bold] wrote: For a redbrick like York, a third living in halls, a third in private HMOs nearby and a third doing something else (distance learning / at home with parents / mature students etc.) is pretty typical. From the figures in the story, it looks like the halls have been scaled up to meet the expansion, but that little or no thought was given to the extra students who'd be living off campus. I'm not convinced that increasing the proportion of students in halls is the answer, either from a social or an economic perspective. Part of the reason for going to university is for these kids to learn to live in the real world, and so the time honoured ritual of spending year 1 in halls and years 2 and 3 in private rented seems to me to be a sound one. Furthermore, students in halls tend to spend less money in the local economy (i.e. they'll spend more in on-campus shops and amenities). And when, as simple demographics dictate, student populations decline, there will be lots of HMOs lying empty and run-down. This is basically a short-term problem, albeit a serious one for the York suburbs situated around the campus.[/p][/quote]I know it makes no difference to this problem but is York a redbrick university? Not sure it is[/p][/quote]Founded in early 60's York isn't a red brick. The term refers to one founded in the 19c or 1st half 20c. Bit surprised at GF not getting this right what with him having had a university education and working in 1. E=MC^2
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1:17pm Fri 20 Aug 10

BioLogic says...

Phantom1974 wrote:
No, I'd have no problem with that because how many of those jobs do York people do? The University wants York people as cleaners and porters, hardly good jobs are they? All the decent posts are held by people who have come in from outside.
You xenophobic idiot. We do not live in some sort of socialist idil.

The university can recruit staff from wherever they want in our society, if you want a Job at the Uni that doesn't involve cleaning or portering, go and get an education that allows you to do it. Which will, incidentally require you to go to University.

If you live in York, you have as much right to access everything this city has to offer as the next person. Whether you were born here or not is immaterial to the whole issue. Please take your racist opinions and disappear, or at very least keep them to yourself.
[quote][p][bold]Phantom1974[/bold] wrote: No, I'd have no problem with that because how many of those jobs do York people do? The University wants York people as cleaners and porters, hardly good jobs are they? All the decent posts are held by people who have come in from outside.[/p][/quote]You xenophobic idiot. We do not live in some sort of socialist idil. The university can recruit staff from wherever they want in our society, if you want a Job at the Uni that doesn't involve cleaning or portering, go and get an education that allows you to do it. Which will, incidentally require you to go to University. If you live in York, you have as much right to access everything this city has to offer as the next person. Whether you were born here or not is immaterial to the whole issue. Please take your racist opinions and disappear, or at very least keep them to yourself. BioLogic
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