HGV cycling accident sparks new safety campaign

York Press: Moira Bradbury Moira Bradbury

SHE broke both arms when she was forced off the road by a lorry – now York cyclist Moira Bradbury’s accident has prompted a new safety campaign for cyclists and lorry drivers.

Ms Bradbury, 54, is only recently back on her bike after the accident, which happened two years ago while on holiday in Scotland.

A haulage vehicle forced her off the road as it overtook her, resulting in an accident in which she sustained a dislocated collarbone as well as the broken arms.

The support worker, from the Boroughbridge Road area, returned to work after a nine- month absence, including time in hospital and intense physiotherapy.

Ms Bradbury is a diabetic who, as a result of her injuries, had to make regular trips to hospital to have her insulin pump changed for her.

She said: “It didn’t just affect me physically.

“I haven’t really felt confident on the road since the accident. I got quite emotional.”

City of York Council offered one-on-one cycle training to help her regain her confidence on the road.

Matthew Tomlinson, personal injury specialist for the legal firm which has represented her in a legal case since the accident, Russell Jones & Walker of Sheffield said: “Moira’s injuries could have been avoided had the driver of the HGV not driven in such an inconsiderate and careless manner.”

Now the firm has been prompted by her injuries and those of other clients to set up the 2 Way Street Campaign, which calls for a better understanding between HGV drivers and cyclists and also more cycle lanes across the UK.

The campaign, launched by TV presenter Gail Porter with support from the national cyclists’ body CTC, included a survey of 1,000 cyclists and 1,000 lorry drivers, and found many lorry drivers worried more about cyclists than any other road users, while many cyclists felt lorries posed a considerable threat to them.

Chris Peck, of the CTC, said it would like to see cycle awareness training for all HGV drivers.

Ms Bradbury said if the new campaign helped make just one lorry driver take more care when passing cyclists, it would have been worthwhile.

Comments (8)

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8:40am Fri 13 Aug 10

Lizzie Browning says...

Strange story and I'm pleased Moira has no permanent damage and is back on her cycle.
Its just that most HGV drivers are hugely skilled and other than a 'seen to be done' exercise, I'm not sure what the campaign is about. Accidents are unfortunate but do happen. - As drivers we all need to aware of cyclists, pedestrians, other road users, etc. but I am not sure a campaign is required each time an accident occurs! Of course lorry drivers worry about cyclists and vice versa - in an ideal world the two don't belong on the same piece of road. But to recommend extra training suggests current incompetence and I just don't think that is the case. This was an unfortunate accident granted, but accidents cannot be factored out of society however much we would wish it.
Just my opinion and not born out of any anti-cycle stance, far from it. Its just I find the story confusing and the aims of the campaign....vague.
Glad to see Moira fit and well though - know her by sight.
Strange story and I'm pleased Moira has no permanent damage and is back on her cycle. Its just that most HGV drivers are hugely skilled and other than a 'seen to be done' exercise, I'm not sure what the campaign is about. Accidents are unfortunate but do happen. - As drivers we all need to aware of cyclists, pedestrians, other road users, etc. but I am not sure a campaign is required each time an accident occurs! Of course lorry drivers worry about cyclists and vice versa - in an ideal world the two don't belong on the same piece of road. But to recommend extra training suggests current incompetence and I just don't think that is the case. This was an unfortunate accident granted, but accidents cannot be factored out of society however much we would wish it. Just my opinion and not born out of any anti-cycle stance, far from it. Its just I find the story confusing and the aims of the campaign....vague. Glad to see Moira fit and well though - know her by sight. Lizzie Browning
  • Score: 0

8:56am Fri 13 Aug 10

Stevie D says...

While I know that lorries are "big and scary" when you're on a bike, I've found vans, small trucks and buses (and, quite frankly, cars) to be more of a problem in terms of inconsiderate or dangerous driving and overtaking, most HGV drivers are extremely good and take a lot of care around cyclists.

I agree that education on all sides is a good thing, although in urban areas I think cyclists generally have more to learn than lorry drivers, in particular about how much a trailer swings out when turning, and how little visibility drivers have of what's behind and beside them.

My biggest quibble with this is the call for more cycle lanes. Cycle lanes don't make roads safer for cyclists. Cycle lanes are useful when they create a channel for cyclists to filter past queueing traffic, but on free-flowing roads they do nothing to help, and often make roads more dangerous by encouraging drivers to get too close to cyclists.

See tinyurl.com/cyclelan
e
(PDF) for more info.
While I know that lorries are "big and scary" when you're on a bike, I've found vans, small trucks and buses (and, quite frankly, cars) to be more of a problem in terms of inconsiderate or dangerous driving and overtaking, most HGV drivers are extremely good and take a lot of care around cyclists. I agree that education on all sides is a good thing, although in urban areas I think cyclists generally have more to learn than lorry drivers, in particular about how much a trailer swings out when turning, and how little visibility drivers have of what's behind and beside them. My biggest quibble with this is the call for more cycle lanes. [bold]Cycle lanes don't make roads safer for cyclists[/bold]. Cycle lanes are useful when they create a channel for cyclists to filter past queueing traffic, but on free-flowing roads they do nothing to help, and often make roads more dangerous by encouraging drivers to get too close to cyclists. See [bold]tinyurl.com/cyclelan e[/bold] (PDF) for more info. Stevie D
  • Score: 0

8:59am Fri 13 Aug 10

1speedisalluneed says...

Lizzie Browning wrote:
Strange story and I'm pleased Moira has no permanent damage and is back on her cycle.
Its just that most HGV drivers are hugely skilled and other than a 'seen to be done' exercise, I'm not sure what the campaign is about. Accidents are unfortunate but do happen. - As drivers we all need to aware of cyclists, pedestrians, other road users, etc. but I am not sure a campaign is required each time an accident occurs! Of course lorry drivers worry about cyclists and vice versa - in an ideal world the two don't belong on the same piece of road. But to recommend extra training suggests current incompetence and I just don't think that is the case. This was an unfortunate accident granted, but accidents cannot be factored out of society however much we would wish it.
Just my opinion and not born out of any anti-cycle stance, far from it. Its just I find the story confusing and the aims of the campaign....vague.
Glad to see Moira fit and well though - know her by sight.
Well put, good idea but its not often the HGV's that cause me an issue whilst commuting its vans & cars cutting me up.
Glad Moira is back on her bike again
[quote][p][bold]Lizzie Browning[/bold] wrote: Strange story and I'm pleased Moira has no permanent damage and is back on her cycle. Its just that most HGV drivers are hugely skilled and other than a 'seen to be done' exercise, I'm not sure what the campaign is about. Accidents are unfortunate but do happen. - As drivers we all need to aware of cyclists, pedestrians, other road users, etc. but I am not sure a campaign is required each time an accident occurs! Of course lorry drivers worry about cyclists and vice versa - in an ideal world the two don't belong on the same piece of road. But to recommend extra training suggests current incompetence and I just don't think that is the case. This was an unfortunate accident granted, but accidents cannot be factored out of society however much we would wish it. Just my opinion and not born out of any anti-cycle stance, far from it. Its just I find the story confusing and the aims of the campaign....vague. Glad to see Moira fit and well though - know her by sight.[/p][/quote]Well put, good idea but its not often the HGV's that cause me an issue whilst commuting its vans & cars cutting me up. Glad Moira is back on her bike again 1speedisalluneed
  • Score: 0

9:18am Fri 13 Aug 10

North Wales Yorkie says...

Perhaps it's a Scottish thing. On a recent holiday we took a long detour out of Inverness as the HGVs were passing dangerously close on the main road. Later in the same holiday I was deliberately run off the road on two occasions by HGV drivers.
Perhaps it's a Scottish thing. On a recent holiday we took a long detour out of Inverness as the HGVs were passing dangerously close on the main road. Later in the same holiday I was deliberately run off the road on two occasions by HGV drivers. North Wales Yorkie
  • Score: 0

8:11pm Fri 13 Aug 10

petethefeet says...

Two words - "Two metres". That is the recommended separation space stated in the highway code. How many drivers know and comply with this?
Two words - "Two metres". That is the recommended separation space stated in the highway code. How many drivers know and comply with this? petethefeet
  • Score: 0

9:33pm Fri 13 Aug 10

old_geezer says...

Agreed, most HGV drivers give me a reasonably wide berth - but when they don't, it's truly terrifying. With a car or van I imagine being bashed off (bad enough), but with the HGV I worry about being sucked under the rear wheels.
Agreed, most HGV drivers give me a reasonably wide berth - but when they don't, it's truly terrifying. With a car or van I imagine being bashed off (bad enough), but with the HGV I worry about being sucked under the rear wheels. old_geezer
  • Score: 0

11:28pm Fri 13 Aug 10

petethefeet says...

If a short vehicle passes then it is fairly easy for a cyclist to remain 'wobble-free' for a second or so. However, the effort it took not to bounce into the First York bendy-bus that overtook me outside the sorting office this week was immense. The s0d should be locked up for attempted murder.
And this is the crux of my argument. CYC will take central funds to fanny-about with road markings, etc, but it does little to make the roads safer for cyclists. Getting rid of bendy-buses, lanes and the universal adoption of 20mph would be a good starter. OK, it will upset some of the selfish (numpty) commentators on this site, but they are in need of the proverbial kick-up-the-bum!
If a short vehicle passes then it is fairly easy for a cyclist to remain 'wobble-free' for a second or so. However, the effort it took not to bounce into the First York bendy-bus that overtook me outside the sorting office this week was immense. The s0d should be locked up for attempted murder. And this is the crux of my argument. CYC will take central funds to fanny-about with road markings, etc, but it does little to make the roads safer for cyclists. Getting rid of bendy-buses, lanes and the universal adoption of 20mph would be a good starter. OK, it will upset some of the selfish (numpty) commentators on this site, but they are in need of the proverbial kick-up-the-bum! petethefeet
  • Score: 0

11:21am Sat 14 Aug 10

Get-a-grip says...

All goes to show that bicycles are an obsolete form of transport totally unsuited to the 21st century. And that's despite the £millions spent on congestion causing cycle lanes and tracks.
All goes to show that bicycles are an obsolete form of transport totally unsuited to the 21st century. And that's despite the £millions spent on congestion causing cycle lanes and tracks. Get-a-grip
  • Score: 0

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