Investigation at York Hospital Trust over cancer and emergency care failings

Investigation launched at York Hospital Trust over cancer and emergency care failings

Investigation launched at York Hospital Trust over cancer and emergency care failings

First published in News
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PATIENTS at York Hospital Trust are waiting too long to be assessed for emergency and cancer care, national inspectors have said.

An investigation has been launched at York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust by health regulator Monitor, which has said "it is simply not acceptable for patients to be waiting too long in A&E or to be seen following a cancer referral".

Cancer patients have had to wait too long for treatment and the trust - which runs hospitals in York, Scarborough, Bridlington, Whitby, Malton and Selby - has failed to meet waiting time targets for A&E for the fifth time in nearly two years.

"Repeated failure" to ensure patients are seen quickly enough could indicate wider problems in how York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is run, the regulator has said.

Frances Shattock, regional director at Monitor, said: “It is simply not acceptable for patients to be waiting too long in A&E or to be seen following a cancer referral. That’s why we are opening an investigation to understand the issues and, if necessary, make sure the trust makes urgent improvements on behalf of its patients."

York Outer MP Julian Sturdy said waiting times were a concern among his constituents.

He said: "The current delays are frankly not good enough as I have made clear to the Hospital Trust...It is absolutely vital for patients across York and the wider region that our local hospitals consistently deliver the highest quality healthcare. Sadly this investigation shows this is not currently the case".

Patients with suspected breast cancer have had to wait longer than the two week urgent referral time from their GP for suspected breast cancer - primarily in Scarborough, the trust has said.

Scarborough referrals have been re-directed to York since July to address the problem as a temporary measure and until new members of staff can be recruited.

Patrick Crowley, chief executive of York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, said:  “We must treat any scrutiny of our performance as an opportunity to learn and improve, and whilst I do not want people to be unduly worried by this it is nonetheless something we are approaching as an absolutely priority.

“The difficulties in A&E are well documented, and in many ways this action by Monitor is inevitable given the pressures we are facing."

He emphasised the investigation is not concerned with the care or treatment provided to cancer patients, which met targets.

Mr Crowley said problems in A&E were symptomatic of wider problems "and not one that can only be resolved through changes in either A&E or the wider acute pathway within our hospitals".  

Monitor said the investigation could take months and potential outcomes could be setting up an improvement plan or deciding the trust needs "extra support at a senior level".

 

 

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3:42pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Jimbob303 says...

My experiences of york hospitals cancer care was atrocious
My experiences of york hospitals cancer care was atrocious Jimbob303
  • Score: 3

3:48pm Wed 3 Sep 14

rws841 says...

I've had the misfortune of going to A&E a few times. Although the wait was long - 3 to 5 hours in all cases, my treatment there was pretty exemplory: barring one case. I went to A&E in the midst of a severe anxiety attack and the nurse accused me of wasting time and lying,, and threatened to call the police, and did call security, as my uncontrollable sobbing was "threatening behaviour". Mental health assessments really need changing at the Trust if this sort of behaviour is the norm. It's really made me pause about ever going back there.
I've had the misfortune of going to A&E a few times. Although the wait was long - 3 to 5 hours in all cases, my treatment there was pretty exemplory: barring one case. I went to A&E in the midst of a severe anxiety attack and the nurse accused me of wasting time and lying,, and threatened to call the police, and did call security, as my uncontrollable sobbing was "threatening behaviour". Mental health assessments really need changing at the Trust if this sort of behaviour is the norm. It's really made me pause about ever going back there. rws841
  • Score: 13

4:30pm Wed 3 Sep 14

JHardacre says...

So the fact that they are having £10m taken away is not relevant to this problem? Does someone in Government think that removing this money will improve the situation. By the same logic i vote that MPs salaries are reduced by say 50% - think how more productive they will become.
So the fact that they are having £10m taken away is not relevant to this problem? Does someone in Government think that removing this money will improve the situation. By the same logic i vote that MPs salaries are reduced by say 50% - think how more productive they will become. JHardacre
  • Score: 17

4:31pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Buaidhnobas says...

My cancer care at York Hospital this year since bowel cancer was identified in January has been excellent in every way. It could not have been better. Appointments were promptly offered, scans conducted efficiently and helpfully, everything was properly explained, every possible piece of information and guidance about cancer is available, the surgeon and team were excellent, the staff and doctors on Ward 16 were very good, and the post surgery specialist nurses simply the best. I also cannot praise my GP highly enough for sending me for the initial scan quickly, and the District Nurses who visited me at home every day for two weeks to dress a surgical wound.
I have no connection with anyone at York Hospital and speak as an ordinary NHS patient. I am fortunate to have had what I consider the best attention and care that could be given anywhere. What the future holds no one knows, but I am pleased to praise everyone at York Hospital and my GP surgery during my cancer experience.
A&E is a different matter, but I have found the professionalism and attention there excellent in the circumstances. I have had to use the service a few times this year because of my cancer illness and have always found everyone as professional, competent and helpful as possible in an exceptionally busy and overworked department.
One problem is ambulance crews having to wait until the patient they have carried is seen at A&E and this can and does cause serious delays in crews being able to get to other callers needing the service.
I think from my experience (I grew up in a hospital environment as my father and his parents were in senior positions working hands-on in hospital medicine from the early 1900s through to the late 1960s) that the hospital staff at York work very hard and do a professional, competent and positively effective job. There will always be exceptions; no system is perfect. It can always be improved. Having said that there are clearly huge difficulties facing the York Trust and the NHS, more than ever before, and there is no quick-fix solution. What everyone must strive for is to uphold the principles of the NHS and ensure it is safeguarded.
My cancer care at York Hospital this year since bowel cancer was identified in January has been excellent in every way. It could not have been better. Appointments were promptly offered, scans conducted efficiently and helpfully, everything was properly explained, every possible piece of information and guidance about cancer is available, the surgeon and team were excellent, the staff and doctors on Ward 16 were very good, and the post surgery specialist nurses simply the best. I also cannot praise my GP highly enough for sending me for the initial scan quickly, and the District Nurses who visited me at home every day for two weeks to dress a surgical wound. I have no connection with anyone at York Hospital and speak as an ordinary NHS patient. I am fortunate to have had what I consider the best attention and care that could be given anywhere. What the future holds no one knows, but I am pleased to praise everyone at York Hospital and my GP surgery during my cancer experience. A&E is a different matter, but I have found the professionalism and attention there excellent in the circumstances. I have had to use the service a few times this year because of my cancer illness and have always found everyone as professional, competent and helpful as possible in an exceptionally busy and overworked department. One problem is ambulance crews having to wait until the patient they have carried is seen at A&E and this can and does cause serious delays in crews being able to get to other callers needing the service. I think from my experience (I grew up in a hospital environment as my father and his parents were in senior positions working hands-on in hospital medicine from the early 1900s through to the late 1960s) that the hospital staff at York work very hard and do a professional, competent and positively effective job. There will always be exceptions; no system is perfect. It can always be improved. Having said that there are clearly huge difficulties facing the York Trust and the NHS, more than ever before, and there is no quick-fix solution. What everyone must strive for is to uphold the principles of the NHS and ensure it is safeguarded. Buaidhnobas
  • Score: 22

4:32pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Midges says...

My diagnosis for pancreatic cancer from referral by my doctor to receiving my first cycle of chemotherapy took 9 weeks. I think that is amazing considering the number of scans I had at York and St James in Leeds. I have nothing but praise for the staff concerned. I feel sorry for anyone who has to wait at a very stressful time.
My diagnosis for pancreatic cancer from referral by my doctor to receiving my first cycle of chemotherapy took 9 weeks. I think that is amazing considering the number of scans I had at York and St James in Leeds. I have nothing but praise for the staff concerned. I feel sorry for anyone who has to wait at a very stressful time. Midges
  • Score: 20

5:03pm Wed 3 Sep 14

only human says...

Maybe if the gp service was more easily accessible across York there wouldnt be so many people feeling they have no option but to go to A&E for treatment which in some cases could have been dealt with by a district nurse or GP.
As someone who has to regularly contact out of hours services across York it frustrates me the length of time and the amount of questions and push button options you have to go through just to get to a health professional for advice.
I had to call 111 recently to check on some medication which an elderly client had been sent home from an out patients appointment with at 7pm at night.
The packaging had very vague instructions for administering the drugs and i needed to confirm when they were to be taken alongside existing mmedication or seperate.
The hospital clinic was now closed ,the Gp surgery was closed and i was re directed to the 111 service where i was asked umpteen questions and wasted 45 minutes only to be told to contact the gp the following morning which was a saturday ..I ended up contacting the GP on the following Tuesday as it was a bank hol mon .The gp was quite short and said that they had no idea about the medication and gave me the no of the out patients receptionist for the consultant who had prescribed the new medication.She was unhelpful and took my number saying she would have to check the notes and would get back to me.Two hours later i was ending my shift and tried to fone her again,she was annoyed this time and snapped.oh i havnt had time to look yet.
So i had to pass this onto my team leader to follow up.
Three weeks and umpteem calls to GP ,Dn ,Ydh ,chemist and even family and we still have no clarification.
As it turns out the elderly person for whom the new medication was intended had a fall and was admitted onto a ward where they have remained to this day.
Really, this is unacceptable but very typical of a day in the life of an ordinary carer and the YDH sagas.
We could write a book of the tales we have encountered over recent years.
Maybe if the gp service was more easily accessible across York there wouldnt be so many people feeling they have no option but to go to A&E for treatment which in some cases could have been dealt with by a district nurse or GP. As someone who has to regularly contact out of hours services across York it frustrates me the length of time and the amount of questions and push button options you have to go through just to get to a health professional for advice. I had to call 111 recently to check on some medication which an elderly client had been sent home from an out patients appointment with at 7pm at night. The packaging had very vague instructions for administering the drugs and i needed to confirm when they were to be taken alongside existing mmedication or seperate. The hospital clinic was now closed ,the Gp surgery was closed and i was re directed to the 111 service where i was asked umpteen questions and wasted 45 minutes only to be told to contact the gp the following morning which was a saturday ..I ended up contacting the GP on the following Tuesday as it was a bank hol mon .The gp was quite short and said that they had no idea about the medication and gave me the no of the out patients receptionist for the consultant who had prescribed the new medication.She was unhelpful and took my number saying she would have to check the notes and would get back to me.Two hours later i was ending my shift and tried to fone her again,she was annoyed this time and snapped.oh i havnt had time to look yet. So i had to pass this onto my team leader to follow up. Three weeks and umpteem calls to GP ,Dn ,Ydh ,chemist and even family and we still have no clarification. As it turns out the elderly person for whom the new medication was intended had a fall and was admitted onto a ward where they have remained to this day. Really, this is unacceptable but very typical of a day in the life of an ordinary carer and the YDH sagas. We could write a book of the tales we have encountered over recent years. only human
  • Score: 7

5:27pm Wed 3 Sep 14

deckhanddave says...

Too many chiefs and not enough indians as the saying goes, bureaucracy gone mad. Cut doctors and increase lower paid staff numbers to do their jobs and spend the savings giving pay rises to management.

From V Of Y CCG to YTH NHS Foundation Trust to the practice partners in GP surgery's, they are all as bad as one another. Self seeking, self promoting, selfish business minded people whom worship the ££££ above all else. No wonder the medical profession did away with the Hippocratic Oath. They should now call it the 'Hypocritical Oath'.
Too many chiefs and not enough indians as the saying goes, bureaucracy gone mad. Cut doctors and increase lower paid staff numbers to do their jobs and spend the savings giving pay rises to management. From V Of Y CCG to YTH NHS Foundation Trust to the practice partners in GP surgery's, they are all as bad as one another. Self seeking, self promoting, selfish business minded people whom worship the ££££ above all else. No wonder the medical profession did away with the Hippocratic Oath. They should now call it the 'Hypocritical Oath'. deckhanddave
  • Score: -8

5:29pm Wed 3 Sep 14

big boy york says...

rws841 wrote:
I've had the misfortune of going to A&E a few times. Although the wait was long - 3 to 5 hours in all cases, my treatment there was pretty exemplory: barring one case. I went to A&E in the midst of a severe anxiety attack and the nurse accused me of wasting time and lying,, and threatened to call the police, and did call security, as my uncontrollable sobbing was "threatening behaviour". Mental health assessments really need changing at the Trust if this sort of behaviour is the norm. It's really made me pause about ever going back there.
three years ago i started suffering severe anxiety attacks, like you i made numerous trips to A&E first few times i was treated extremely well then i must have met your nurse who accused me of wasting her time & sent me home with a flea in my ear even though i told her i was having problems breathing 3 hours later i collapsed at work was rushed back in with a blood clot on my lung & guess who was the nurse that treated me yes the one that sent me home
[quote][p][bold]rws841[/bold] wrote: I've had the misfortune of going to A&E a few times. Although the wait was long - 3 to 5 hours in all cases, my treatment there was pretty exemplory: barring one case. I went to A&E in the midst of a severe anxiety attack and the nurse accused me of wasting time and lying,, and threatened to call the police, and did call security, as my uncontrollable sobbing was "threatening behaviour". Mental health assessments really need changing at the Trust if this sort of behaviour is the norm. It's really made me pause about ever going back there.[/p][/quote]three years ago i started suffering severe anxiety attacks, like you i made numerous trips to A&E first few times i was treated extremely well then i must have met your nurse who accused me of wasting her time & sent me home with a flea in my ear even though i told her i was having problems breathing 3 hours later i collapsed at work was rushed back in with a blood clot on my lung & guess who was the nurse that treated me yes the one that sent me home big boy york
  • Score: 10

5:41pm Wed 3 Sep 14

redbluelion says...

doctors and nurses do a great job. God sends in my book.
doctors and nurses do a great job. God sends in my book. redbluelion
  • Score: 7

6:08pm Wed 3 Sep 14

York1900 says...

York Hospital Trust is not on its own in the firing line

When you get more managers who do nothing except shuffle paper and count the costs in any Business you start to lose money hand over fist because your paper shufflers start to cost you more than the savings they were charged to save


2 September 2014 Last updated at 19:26
East Kent hospitals NHS trust put into special measures
http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/uk-england-ken
t-29022821
York Hospital Trust is not on its own in the firing line When you get more managers who do nothing except shuffle paper and count the costs in any Business you start to lose money hand over fist because your paper shufflers start to cost you more than the savings they were charged to save 2 September 2014 Last updated at 19:26 East Kent hospitals NHS trust put into special measures http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/uk-england-ken t-29022821 York1900
  • Score: 9

6:57pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Miles Davis says...

deckhanddave wrote:
Too many chiefs and not enough indians as the saying goes, bureaucracy gone mad. Cut doctors and increase lower paid staff numbers to do their jobs and spend the savings giving pay rises to management.

From V Of Y CCG to YTH NHS Foundation Trust to the practice partners in GP surgery's, they are all as bad as one another. Self seeking, self promoting, selfish business minded people whom worship the ££££ above all else. No wonder the medical profession did away with the Hippocratic Oath. They should now call it the 'Hypocritical Oath'.
You obviously have no idea what your talking about!! Surely you mean increase doctors, nurses and other medical staff? AND also decrease management roles and staff?
[quote][p][bold]deckhanddave[/bold] wrote: Too many chiefs and not enough indians as the saying goes, bureaucracy gone mad. Cut doctors and increase lower paid staff numbers to do their jobs and spend the savings giving pay rises to management. From V Of Y CCG to YTH NHS Foundation Trust to the practice partners in GP surgery's, they are all as bad as one another. Self seeking, self promoting, selfish business minded people whom worship the ££££ above all else. No wonder the medical profession did away with the Hippocratic Oath. They should now call it the 'Hypocritical Oath'.[/p][/quote]You obviously have no idea what your talking about!! Surely you mean increase doctors, nurses and other medical staff? AND also decrease management roles and staff? Miles Davis
  • Score: 9

7:05pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Miles Davis says...

Its all about economics. Year after year cut backs in funding for hospitals, yet the cost of running these hospitals has increased. Electricity and gas has risen and the cost of medical equipment and drugs has risen too. This has given rise to fewer staff being employed and therefore some wards have had to close. Fewer beds means that patients entering via A&E have a longer wait to get onto a ward after their initial treatment. If there are no beds for these patients it means it takes longer for new patients to be seen and therefor they are queuing in the corridor. The new bed system in A&E cannot work proper;y as there are not enough nursing staff to man the A&E dept let alone a new triage system!
More funding, a pay rise for nurses as they have not had a meaningful pay rise in 3 years. More staff and more beds. And you wait until all the extra houses have been built that the council want to build! How many more people will need this small hospital then?!!
Its all about economics. Year after year cut backs in funding for hospitals, yet the cost of running these hospitals has increased. Electricity and gas has risen and the cost of medical equipment and drugs has risen too. This has given rise to fewer staff being employed and therefore some wards have had to close. Fewer beds means that patients entering via A&E have a longer wait to get onto a ward after their initial treatment. If there are no beds for these patients it means it takes longer for new patients to be seen and therefor they are queuing in the corridor. The new bed system in A&E cannot work proper;y as there are not enough nursing staff to man the A&E dept let alone a new triage system! More funding, a pay rise for nurses as they have not had a meaningful pay rise in 3 years. More staff and more beds. And you wait until all the extra houses have been built that the council want to build! How many more people will need this small hospital then?!! Miles Davis
  • Score: 7

7:14pm Wed 3 Sep 14

janpk2752 says...

Buaidhnobas wrote:
My cancer care at York Hospital this year since bowel cancer was identified in January has been excellent in every way. It could not have been better. Appointments were promptly offered, scans conducted efficiently and helpfully, everything was properly explained, every possible piece of information and guidance about cancer is available, the surgeon and team were excellent, the staff and doctors on Ward 16 were very good, and the post surgery specialist nurses simply the best. I also cannot praise my GP highly enough for sending me for the initial scan quickly, and the District Nurses who visited me at home every day for two weeks to dress a surgical wound.
I have no connection with anyone at York Hospital and speak as an ordinary NHS patient. I am fortunate to have had what I consider the best attention and care that could be given anywhere. What the future holds no one knows, but I am pleased to praise everyone at York Hospital and my GP surgery during my cancer experience.
A&E is a different matter, but I have found the professionalism and attention there excellent in the circumstances. I have had to use the service a few times this year because of my cancer illness and have always found everyone as professional, competent and helpful as possible in an exceptionally busy and overworked department.
One problem is ambulance crews having to wait until the patient they have carried is seen at A&E and this can and does cause serious delays in crews being able to get to other callers needing the service.
I think from my experience (I grew up in a hospital environment as my father and his parents were in senior positions working hands-on in hospital medicine from the early 1900s through to the late 1960s) that the hospital staff at York work very hard and do a professional, competent and positively effective job. There will always be exceptions; no system is perfect. It can always be improved. Having said that there are clearly huge difficulties facing the York Trust and the NHS, more than ever before, and there is no quick-fix solution. What everyone must strive for is to uphold the principles of the NHS and ensure it is safeguarded.
I agree the care my husband has received has been fantastic from having a cardiac arrest then having a double bypass recouping from that about 12 weeks done the line been told he had lymphoma the help and attention has been brill not to the McMillan nurses have been great also, so why cant the managers that do nothing and the MP's take the wage cuts and share it out to the people who work.It seems the nurses go and do training but have to work of form filling my days they were called office workers and nurses nursed and office worker did the paper work,,,, right I've had my moan not that the people who can do something will do anything we just breath and never listened to.......
[quote][p][bold]Buaidhnobas[/bold] wrote: My cancer care at York Hospital this year since bowel cancer was identified in January has been excellent in every way. It could not have been better. Appointments were promptly offered, scans conducted efficiently and helpfully, everything was properly explained, every possible piece of information and guidance about cancer is available, the surgeon and team were excellent, the staff and doctors on Ward 16 were very good, and the post surgery specialist nurses simply the best. I also cannot praise my GP highly enough for sending me for the initial scan quickly, and the District Nurses who visited me at home every day for two weeks to dress a surgical wound. I have no connection with anyone at York Hospital and speak as an ordinary NHS patient. I am fortunate to have had what I consider the best attention and care that could be given anywhere. What the future holds no one knows, but I am pleased to praise everyone at York Hospital and my GP surgery during my cancer experience. A&E is a different matter, but I have found the professionalism and attention there excellent in the circumstances. I have had to use the service a few times this year because of my cancer illness and have always found everyone as professional, competent and helpful as possible in an exceptionally busy and overworked department. One problem is ambulance crews having to wait until the patient they have carried is seen at A&E and this can and does cause serious delays in crews being able to get to other callers needing the service. I think from my experience (I grew up in a hospital environment as my father and his parents were in senior positions working hands-on in hospital medicine from the early 1900s through to the late 1960s) that the hospital staff at York work very hard and do a professional, competent and positively effective job. There will always be exceptions; no system is perfect. It can always be improved. Having said that there are clearly huge difficulties facing the York Trust and the NHS, more than ever before, and there is no quick-fix solution. What everyone must strive for is to uphold the principles of the NHS and ensure it is safeguarded.[/p][/quote]I agree the care my husband has received has been fantastic from having a cardiac arrest then having a double bypass recouping from that about 12 weeks done the line been told he had lymphoma the help and attention has been brill not to the McMillan nurses have been great also, so why cant the managers that do nothing and the MP's take the wage cuts and share it out to the people who work.It seems the nurses go and do training but have to work of form filling my days they were called office workers and nurses nursed and office worker did the paper work,,,, right I've had my moan not that the people who can do something will do anything we just breath and never listened to....... janpk2752
  • Score: 5

7:22pm Wed 3 Sep 14

bogbrush II (the one under the stairs) says...

Can I assume the fines are not being levied on all local hospitals and that York are in fact doing less well than other hospitals and hence this new investigation? Was yesterday's story just pre-emptive action to deflect from today's news?
If in other hospitals patients can be seen without waiting for hours why can't York do that. I agree GP opening times are poor but my GP told me that they can't replace a retired partner because young doctors don't want to buy in. I don't blame them. They do work long days so who can expect them to work even longer?
I've always had ok treatment at the hospital though a friend who was admitted with a fractured leg had terrible treatment. I think targets help us know, in general are they doing ok, or not and not base our views on our own experience. It seems to me if they are not managing to see cancer patients quickly they need to be investigated. I'm told the hospital never turns patients away from A&E, even if they've gone in with a insect bite coz they get £60 every time you go. My GP doesn't get anymore for looking after me whether I go once a year or every week. No wonder A&E is open 24hours! It's like Tesco - it likes the customers, so long as you put up with the wait.
Can I assume the fines are not being levied on all local hospitals and that York are in fact doing less well than other hospitals and hence this new investigation? Was yesterday's story just pre-emptive action to deflect from today's news? If in other hospitals patients can be seen without waiting for hours why can't York do that. I agree GP opening times are poor but my GP told me that they can't replace a retired partner because young doctors don't want to buy in. I don't blame them. They do work long days so who can expect them to work even longer? I've always had ok treatment at the hospital though a friend who was admitted with a fractured leg had terrible treatment. I think targets help us know, in general are they doing ok, or not and not base our views on our own experience. It seems to me if they are not managing to see cancer patients quickly they need to be investigated. I'm told the hospital never turns patients away from A&E, even if they've gone in with a insect bite coz they get £60 every time you go. My GP doesn't get anymore for looking after me whether I go once a year or every week. No wonder A&E is open 24hours! It's like Tesco - it likes the customers, so long as you put up with the wait. bogbrush II (the one under the stairs)
  • Score: 2

8:16pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Digeorge says...

I, myself, have had an appalling time in A&E on a number of occasions recently due to complications from thyroid surgery. This has necessitated my endocrine consultant writing to the Head of A&E to confirm said endocrine disorder which is extremely rare with its complications to state that if I appeared on AMU that I should be admitted because of its complexity AND that he should be called if it is during the week.

Despite having said letter in my hand on admission, it was not done and ignored, the blood tests not done, nor a proper clinical history. Months later when eventually the bloods were done in AMU, it was proved that I had indeed had a hypoparathyroidism crash and complications together with recent thyroid surgery which required aspiration several times. Hours I was waiting for in A&E for them to contact the ENT team. Like 4 hours.

Tired of that department for still targeting me for historical munchausen CRAP and actually 'getting' my diagnoses when the bloods are actually starring you in the face as is all the consultants in the hospital. Thanks and all for the last non-sense and as for that other consultant removing half my medical information to give a different opinion.

I have also come to the conclusion that the whole hospital are incapable of doing swabs for infection properly (I have witnessed one pouring the stuff down the sink) and one first sample being rejected whilst not on antibiotics as they didn't wish to get to the bug concerned. Just threw antibiotics at it regardless, **** poor.

NHS 111 at least DID refer me to the ward when I was seen by the out-of-hours consultants.
I, myself, have had an appalling time in A&E on a number of occasions recently due to complications from thyroid surgery. This has necessitated my endocrine consultant writing to the Head of A&E to confirm said endocrine disorder which is extremely rare with its complications to state that if I appeared on AMU that I should be admitted because of its complexity AND that he should be called if it is during the week. Despite having said letter in my hand on admission, it was not done and ignored, the blood tests not done, nor a proper clinical history. Months later when eventually the bloods were done in AMU, it was proved that I had indeed had a hypoparathyroidism crash and complications together with recent thyroid surgery which required aspiration several times. Hours I was waiting for in A&E for them to contact the ENT team. Like 4 hours. Tired of that department for still targeting me for historical munchausen CRAP and actually 'getting' my diagnoses when the bloods are actually starring you in the face as is all the consultants in the hospital. Thanks and all for the last non-sense and as for that other consultant removing half my medical information to give a different opinion. I have also come to the conclusion that the whole hospital are incapable of doing swabs for infection properly (I have witnessed one pouring the stuff down the sink) and one first sample being rejected whilst not on antibiotics as they didn't wish to get to the bug concerned. Just threw antibiotics at it regardless, **** poor. NHS 111 at least DID refer me to the ward when I was seen by the out-of-hours consultants. Digeorge
  • Score: 2

8:43pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Digeorge says...

And some of those admissions to A&E would have been 'avoided' had a) I not been discharged from the surgeon where there was an ongoing infection b) that the endocrinology appointments had not been downgraded to two per year instead of 3 monthly. A bit of care and dignity and 'acceptance' that I have a genuine complex condition. (that is part of your problem).

Remember your Trust values!!! Clearly doesn't apply here.

So It has cost the Trust more in people like me attending A&E than had I had my regular appointment when said endocrine issues are still unstable.

Well done for creating such a debt and a mess that doesn't also include my 'stress' levels.
And some of those admissions to A&E would have been 'avoided' had a) I not been discharged from the surgeon where there was an ongoing infection b) that the endocrinology appointments had not been downgraded to two per year instead of 3 monthly. A bit of care and dignity and 'acceptance' that I have a genuine complex condition. (that is part of your problem). Remember your Trust values!!! Clearly doesn't apply here. So It has cost the Trust more in people like me attending A&E than had I had my regular appointment when said endocrine issues are still unstable. Well done for creating such a debt and a mess that doesn't also include my 'stress' levels. Digeorge
  • Score: 1

8:47pm Wed 3 Sep 14

ouseswimmer says...

The problem faced in York is far too many managers. In a lot of organisations managers tend to like and encourage more managers who can helop them write reports etc. I have often find this slows any progress and inflates the wage budget. When cutbacks are required its the workers who are ejected whilst the managers tend to keep their positions. This vastly reduces the number of nurses etc. Care standards fall but the managers say they are doing everything that can be done to meet targets. York is badly over managed and needs to trim an entire management level thus speeding up decision making and hugely reducing the cost structure.
The problem faced in York is far too many managers. In a lot of organisations managers tend to like and encourage more managers who can helop them write reports etc. I have often find this slows any progress and inflates the wage budget. When cutbacks are required its the workers who are ejected whilst the managers tend to keep their positions. This vastly reduces the number of nurses etc. Care standards fall but the managers say they are doing everything that can be done to meet targets. York is badly over managed and needs to trim an entire management level thus speeding up decision making and hugely reducing the cost structure. ouseswimmer
  • Score: 0

11:43pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Jack Ham says...

Sadly York Hospital has far too many over paid senior managers along with a vastly overpaid Chief Exec.

Expect to hear many excuses and the blame being put elsewhere.
Sadly York Hospital has far too many over paid senior managers along with a vastly overpaid Chief Exec. Expect to hear many excuses and the blame being put elsewhere. Jack Ham
  • Score: -17

6:25am Thu 4 Sep 14

krites says...

Is Patrick Crowley's pure management-speak gobbledy-gook supposed to give us any confidence at all?
Is Patrick Crowley's pure management-speak gobbledy-gook supposed to give us any confidence at all? krites
  • Score: 1

7:22am Thu 4 Sep 14

oi oi savaloy says...

Too much money wasted in the NHS, the labour party poured millions in to it and never asked the question "what are you going to do with this money?" people like Patrick Cowley thought it was just a free for all, so awarded themselves massive pay rises and then people like Patrick Cowley created more positions like Patrick Cowleys , hence a very broken NHS where people with medical problems are finding that you are on very long waiting lists , its just taken me over 6 months to get an appointment in the ENT department! Too many obscenley paid chiefs and not enough indians!
Well done labour AGAIN!
Too much money wasted in the NHS, the labour party poured millions in to it and never asked the question "what are you going to do with this money?" people like Patrick Cowley thought it was just a free for all, so awarded themselves massive pay rises and then people like Patrick Cowley created more positions like Patrick Cowleys , hence a very broken NHS where people with medical problems are finding that you are on very long waiting lists , its just taken me over 6 months to get an appointment in the ENT department! Too many obscenley paid chiefs and not enough indians! Well done labour AGAIN! oi oi savaloy
  • Score: -31

8:43am Thu 4 Sep 14

perplexed says...

oi oi savaloy wrote:
Too much money wasted in the NHS, the labour party poured millions in to it and never asked the question "what are you going to do with this money?" people like Patrick Cowley thought it was just a free for all, so awarded themselves massive pay rises and then people like Patrick Cowley created more positions like Patrick Cowleys , hence a very broken NHS where people with medical problems are finding that you are on very long waiting lists , its just taken me over 6 months to get an appointment in the ENT department! Too many obscenley paid chiefs and not enough indians!
Well done labour AGAIN!
While I am certainly no fan of York Hospital, savaloy's usual diatribe of misinformation and utter nonsense belies a real problem with health care today, greater demand and an ageing population . The Tories disastrous Health and Social Care Bill and its 'top down reorganisation " has made things considerably worse, such as firing and then rehiring thousands of PCT staff after having paid out our huge redundancies at huge expense.Hardly value for money!

If York is struggling presently with costs how is fining it going to make it batter? Hospitals are not even paid for many of the people who come through its doors if it is exceeds its agreed quota ! GP's are unable to take up the slack as many are leaving the profession and surgeries are having to merge to survive following cuts in their funding. Add to this the selling off of services to private companies has led to a deterioration in provision such as with Serco in the South West . It is ironic to say the least that THIS government is more than happy to open up our health care system to American Health care providers who in the recent Commonwealth Report were deemed to be the worst of the 11 countries it looked at . FACT, The NHS spends the second-lowest amount on healthcare among the 11 – just £2,008 per head, less than half the £5,017 in the US. Only New Zealand spent less , with £1,876, spent less.

What the NHS needs is far less political inference and a honest debate about funding . Of Course Patrick Cowley has serious questions to answer but so does Julian Sturdy and all those other coalition MP's who voted through the Health and Social Care Bill . Now , there are some obscenely paid 'chiefs' I would like to see the back of !
[quote][p][bold]oi oi savaloy[/bold] wrote: Too much money wasted in the NHS, the labour party poured millions in to it and never asked the question "what are you going to do with this money?" people like Patrick Cowley thought it was just a free for all, so awarded themselves massive pay rises and then people like Patrick Cowley created more positions like Patrick Cowleys , hence a very broken NHS where people with medical problems are finding that you are on very long waiting lists , its just taken me over 6 months to get an appointment in the ENT department! Too many obscenley paid chiefs and not enough indians! Well done labour AGAIN![/p][/quote]While I am certainly no fan of York Hospital, savaloy's usual diatribe of misinformation and utter nonsense belies a real problem with health care today, greater demand and an ageing population . The Tories disastrous Health and Social Care Bill and its 'top down reorganisation " has made things considerably worse, such as firing and then rehiring thousands of PCT staff after having paid out our huge redundancies at huge expense.Hardly value for money! If York is struggling presently with costs how is fining it going to make it batter? Hospitals are not even paid for many of the people who come through its doors if it is exceeds its agreed quota ! GP's are unable to take up the slack as many are leaving the profession and surgeries are having to merge to survive following cuts in their funding. Add to this the selling off of services to private companies has led to a deterioration in provision such as with Serco in the South West . It is ironic to say the least that THIS government is more than happy to open up our health care system to American Health care providers who in the recent Commonwealth Report were deemed to be the worst of the 11 countries it looked at . FACT, The NHS spends the second-lowest amount on healthcare among the 11 – just £2,008 per head, less than half the £5,017 in the US. Only New Zealand spent less , with £1,876, spent less. What the NHS needs is far less political inference and a honest debate about funding . Of Course Patrick Cowley has serious questions to answer but so does Julian Sturdy and all those other coalition MP's who voted through the Health and Social Care Bill . Now , there are some obscenely paid 'chiefs' I would like to see the back of ! perplexed
  • Score: 16

9:40am Thu 4 Sep 14

CHISSY1 says...

I have nothing but praise for the Doctors and Nurses at York Hospital.and particularly Mr Wong.I had colon cancer in 2007 and my treatment was 100%,i am still here.Unfortunately my late wife was not so lucky,she passed away due to cancer two and a half years ago.But her treatment was superb,unfortunately her cancer was more aggressive than mine.
I have nothing but praise for the Doctors and Nurses at York Hospital.and particularly Mr Wong.I had colon cancer in 2007 and my treatment was 100%,i am still here.Unfortunately my late wife was not so lucky,she passed away due to cancer two and a half years ago.But her treatment was superb,unfortunately her cancer was more aggressive than mine. CHISSY1
  • Score: -8

9:42am Thu 4 Sep 14

CHISSY1 says...

JHardacre wrote:
So the fact that they are having £10m taken away is not relevant to this problem? Does someone in Government think that removing this money will improve the situation. By the same logic i vote that MPs salaries are reduced by say 50% - think how more productive they will become.
And i vote to STOP sending billions abroad in so called aid,we need that money.
[quote][p][bold]JHardacre[/bold] wrote: So the fact that they are having £10m taken away is not relevant to this problem? Does someone in Government think that removing this money will improve the situation. By the same logic i vote that MPs salaries are reduced by say 50% - think how more productive they will become.[/p][/quote]And i vote to STOP sending billions abroad in so called aid,we need that money. CHISSY1
  • Score: -5

7:38pm Thu 4 Sep 14

NoMorePlease says...

Digeorge wrote:
I, myself, have had an appalling time in A&E on a number of occasions recently due to complications from thyroid surgery. This has necessitated my endocrine consultant writing to the Head of A&E to confirm said endocrine disorder which is extremely rare with its complications to state that if I appeared on AMU that I should be admitted because of its complexity AND that he should be called if it is during the week.

Despite having said letter in my hand on admission, it was not done and ignored, the blood tests not done, nor a proper clinical history. Months later when eventually the bloods were done in AMU, it was proved that I had indeed had a hypoparathyroidism crash and complications together with recent thyroid surgery which required aspiration several times. Hours I was waiting for in A&E for them to contact the ENT team. Like 4 hours.

Tired of that department for still targeting me for historical munchausen CRAP and actually 'getting' my diagnoses when the bloods are actually starring you in the face as is all the consultants in the hospital. Thanks and all for the last non-sense and as for that other consultant removing half my medical information to give a different opinion.

I have also come to the conclusion that the whole hospital are incapable of doing swabs for infection properly (I have witnessed one pouring the stuff down the sink) and one first sample being rejected whilst not on antibiotics as they didn't wish to get to the bug concerned. Just threw antibiotics at it regardless, **** poor.

NHS 111 at least DID refer me to the ward when I was seen by the out-of-hours consultants.
Every time you give your medical history in detail. Try a passing personal reference for once to make the wider point.
[quote][p][bold]Digeorge[/bold] wrote: I, myself, have had an appalling time in A&E on a number of occasions recently due to complications from thyroid surgery. This has necessitated my endocrine consultant writing to the Head of A&E to confirm said endocrine disorder which is extremely rare with its complications to state that if I appeared on AMU that I should be admitted because of its complexity AND that he should be called if it is during the week. Despite having said letter in my hand on admission, it was not done and ignored, the blood tests not done, nor a proper clinical history. Months later when eventually the bloods were done in AMU, it was proved that I had indeed had a hypoparathyroidism crash and complications together with recent thyroid surgery which required aspiration several times. Hours I was waiting for in A&E for them to contact the ENT team. Like 4 hours. Tired of that department for still targeting me for historical munchausen CRAP and actually 'getting' my diagnoses when the bloods are actually starring you in the face as is all the consultants in the hospital. Thanks and all for the last non-sense and as for that other consultant removing half my medical information to give a different opinion. I have also come to the conclusion that the whole hospital are incapable of doing swabs for infection properly (I have witnessed one pouring the stuff down the sink) and one first sample being rejected whilst not on antibiotics as they didn't wish to get to the bug concerned. Just threw antibiotics at it regardless, **** poor. NHS 111 at least DID refer me to the ward when I was seen by the out-of-hours consultants.[/p][/quote]Every time you give your medical history in detail. Try a passing personal reference for once to make the wider point. NoMorePlease
  • Score: 2

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