Your chance to sample how life was in 1914 at York Castle Museum

Adam Cliff, from the Castle Museum’s Education Department, dressed as a Recruitment Officer with the semaphore flags visitors can used in the When The World Changed Forever exhibition

Adam Cliff, from the Castle Museum’s Education Department, dressed as a Recruitment Officer with the semaphore flags visitors can used in the When The World Changed Forever exhibition

First published in News
Last updated

Visitors to York Castle Museum are being given a chance to discover more of life in 1914 with their new exhibition marking the centenary of the First World War.

1914: When the World Changed Forever will enable people to experience life on the front line by crawling through trenches and decoding messages using semaphore and Morse code machines, with an opportunity to build their own Morse code machine.

There is also the chance to see what life was like for those who signed up to the army, with the museum’s Recruitment Officer running drill sessions to put visitors through their paces.

The exhibition also gives the opportunity for visitors to handle artefacts from the war and visit the Castle kitchens to try some of the traditional hard tack biscuit and anzac biscuits, which were sent to troops by Australian wives.

Lucy Knock, assistant curator of social history-informal learning, said: “With the opening of our new exhibition 1914: When the World Changed Forever, we wanted to give visitors the chance to experience the exhibition in a more hands on way that will appeal to both children and adults.”

The exhibition is part of a £1.7 million project at the museum.

Comments (2)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:34pm Thu 31 Jul 14

MouseHouse says...

Ah yes the good ol' days. Grinding poverty, rickets and diphtheria. Why would anybody want to recreate that?
Ah yes the good ol' days. Grinding poverty, rickets and diphtheria. Why would anybody want to recreate that? MouseHouse
  • Score: -3

12:24am Fri 1 Aug 14

RingoStarr says...

MouseHouse wrote:
Ah yes the good ol' days. Grinding poverty, rickets and diphtheria. Why would anybody want to recreate that?
How can you now where you're going if you don't know where you've been?
[quote][p][bold]MouseHouse[/bold] wrote: Ah yes the good ol' days. Grinding poverty, rickets and diphtheria. Why would anybody want to recreate that?[/p][/quote]How can you now where you're going if you don't know where you've been? RingoStarr
  • Score: 3

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree