Tour de France inspires pupils to learn mountain biking

Tour de France inspires pupils to learn mountain biking

Tour de France inspires pupils to learn mountain biking

First published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by

HUNDREDS of York school children are learning mountain biking skills ahead of the Grand Départ.

Primary schools across the city are introducing their pupils to mountain biking in a project inspired by the forthcoming Tour de France.

Ten primary schools - Badger Hill, Clifton with Rawcliffe, Elvington CE, Hob Moor, New Earswick, Our Lady Queen of Martyrs RC, St Wilfrid’s RC, Stockton on the Forest, Wigginton and Woodthorpe - were randomly selected to offer the sessions to their pupils aged nine to 11.

Each school will host two sessions, organised by City of York Council’s sport and active leisure team, with a total of 24 pupils from each school taking part. The training, run by local company Grit, Track and Trail, will see temporary obstacle courses built at each school with the youngsters having to negotiate wooden structures from log rides, humpback bridges, balance beams and cambered corners to small drops and a see saw.

Cllr Janet Looker, cabinet member for education, said: “These sessions will teach young people important skills such as balance and bike handling as well as being great fun. Mountain biking builds leg strength and endurance, burns fat and contributes to an overall sense of happiness and well-being which are all important in the development of children.”

The mountain bike course will be set up at the Grand Départ spectator hub at York Racecourse on Sunday, July 6 in the Sport Activation Zone. Anyone who has a spectator ticket for this hub can try the course for free on the day.

Cllr Sonja Crisp, cabinet member for tourism said: “The schools project will introduce York pupils to the love of mountain biking and is another example of the city working to build the impact of the Tour de France by encouraging more people to cycle more often and providing opportunities for people of all ages to get involved in cycling.”

Comments (3)

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11:10am Fri 20 Jun 14

dsom73 says...

Unrelated, children take up Handball due to the FIFA World cup, children take up catering after eating McDonalds, children take up journalism due to reading the Press
Unrelated, children take up Handball due to the FIFA World cup, children take up catering after eating McDonalds, children take up journalism due to reading the Press dsom73
  • Score: 8

11:14pm Fri 20 Jun 14

PKH says...

I'd like to see the TDF done on mountain bikes!
I'd like to see the TDF done on mountain bikes! PKH
  • Score: 6

4:09am Sat 21 Jun 14

MikeVandeman says...

Introducing children to mountain biking is CRIMINAL. Mountain biking, besides being expensive and very environmentally destructive, is extremely dangerous. Recently a 12-year-old girl DIED during her very first mountain biking lesson! Serious accidents and even deaths are commonplace. Truth be told, mountain bikers want to introduce kids to mountain biking because (1) they want more people to help them lobby to open our precious natural areas to mountain biking and (2) children are too naive to understand and object to this activity. For 400+ examples of serious accidents and deaths caused by mountain biking, see http://mjvande.nfsho
st.com/mtb_dangerous
.htm.

Bicycles should not be allowed in any natural area. They are inanimate objects and have no rights. There is also no right to mountain bike. That was settled in federal court in 1996: http://mjvande.nfsho
st.com/mtb10.htm . It's dishonest of mountain bikers to say that they don't have access to trails closed to bikes. They have EXACTLY the same access as everyone else -- ON FOOT! Why isn't that good enough for mountain bikers? They are all capable of walking....

A favorite myth of mountain bikers is that mountain biking is no more harmful to wildlife, people, and the environment than hiking, and that science supports that view. Of course, it's not true. To settle the matter once and for all, I read all of the research they cited, and wrote a review of the research on mountain biking impacts (see http://mjvande.nfsho
st.com/scb7.htm ). I found that of the seven studies they cited, (1) all were written by mountain bikers, and (2) in every case, the authors misinterpreted their own data, in order to come to the conclusion that they favored. They also studiously avoided mentioning another scientific study (Wisdom et al) which did not favor mountain biking, and came to the opposite conclusions.

Those were all experimental studies. Two other studies (by White et al and by Jeff Marion) used a survey design, which is inherently incapable of answering that question (comparing hiking with mountain biking). I only mention them because mountain bikers often cite them, but scientifically, they are worthless.

Mountain biking accelerates erosion, creates V-shaped ruts, kills small animals and plants on and next to the trail, drives wildlife and other trail users out of the area, and, worst of all, teaches kids that the rough treatment of nature is okay (it's NOT!). What's good about THAT?

For more information: http://mjvande.nfsho
st.com/mtbfaq.htm .
Introducing children to mountain biking is CRIMINAL. Mountain biking, besides being expensive and very environmentally destructive, is extremely dangerous. Recently a 12-year-old girl DIED during her very first mountain biking lesson! Serious accidents and even deaths are commonplace. Truth be told, mountain bikers want to introduce kids to mountain biking because (1) they want more people to help them lobby to open our precious natural areas to mountain biking and (2) children are too naive to understand and object to this activity. For 400+ examples of serious accidents and deaths caused by mountain biking, see http://mjvande.nfsho st.com/mtb_dangerous .htm. Bicycles should not be allowed in any natural area. They are inanimate objects and have no rights. There is also no right to mountain bike. That was settled in federal court in 1996: http://mjvande.nfsho st.com/mtb10.htm . It's dishonest of mountain bikers to say that they don't have access to trails closed to bikes. They have EXACTLY the same access as everyone else -- ON FOOT! Why isn't that good enough for mountain bikers? They are all capable of walking.... A favorite myth of mountain bikers is that mountain biking is no more harmful to wildlife, people, and the environment than hiking, and that science supports that view. Of course, it's not true. To settle the matter once and for all, I read all of the research they cited, and wrote a review of the research on mountain biking impacts (see http://mjvande.nfsho st.com/scb7.htm ). I found that of the seven studies they cited, (1) all were written by mountain bikers, and (2) in every case, the authors misinterpreted their own data, in order to come to the conclusion that they favored. They also studiously avoided mentioning another scientific study (Wisdom et al) which did not favor mountain biking, and came to the opposite conclusions. Those were all experimental studies. Two other studies (by White et al and by Jeff Marion) used a survey design, which is inherently incapable of answering that question (comparing hiking with mountain biking). I only mention them because mountain bikers often cite them, but scientifically, they are worthless. Mountain biking accelerates erosion, creates V-shaped ruts, kills small animals and plants on and next to the trail, drives wildlife and other trail users out of the area, and, worst of all, teaches kids that the rough treatment of nature is okay (it's NOT!). What's good about THAT? For more information: http://mjvande.nfsho st.com/mtbfaq.htm . MikeVandeman
  • Score: -13

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