North Yorkshire Police announce shake-up plans

York Press: North Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner Julia Mulligan and Chief Constable Dave Jones before the press conference on the new Operational Policing Model at Fulford Police Station North Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner Julia Mulligan and Chief Constable Dave Jones before the press conference on the new Operational Policing Model at Fulford Police Station

POLICE officers could spend up to an extra hour out in the community on each shift when they are issued with new handheld computers in North Yorkshire.

Chief Constable Dave Jones said yesterday that this was the positive impact when the technology - allowing officers to complete paperwork without having to return to their police station - was introduced at his former force in Northern Ireland.

Although he could not commit to such a time-saving in North Yorkshire, he said he was passionate about keeping officers visible in its communities, saying: “I believe this is crucial to successful policing and I know this is what the public want to see too.

“The investment in technology is designed to support this. We will be able to pinpoint where our resources are needed to tackle crime and anti-social behaviour, which will ensure North Yorkshire Police is even more productive and continues to offer value for money.”

He also spoke about the potential technological help which the mobile devices could offer officers in future, when it might be possible to use them, for example, to carry out fingerprint tests and Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) checks.

The new mobile devices are part of a £10 million shake-up of the force, dubbed Operational Policing Model (OPM), which was announced yesterday by the Chief Constable and the Crime Commissioner Julia Mulligan.

Other measures include new ANPR equipment to cut down on cross-border and vehicle crime, the closure of the Selby custody suite and new “Investigation Hubs” to be set up in York, Scarborough, Harrogate and Northallerton.

A review of senior police ranks such as Chief Inspectors and Superintendents is also expected to save £1 million, with the money used to fund an additional 20 constables who will directly support community policing.

Mrs Mulligan said that the plans showed that despite years of austerity, the force was still investing in community policing, and working with victims of crime.

She said: “Making it easier for officers to do their jobs on the move, without having to come back to the station to fill in and submit paperwork, will mean more time spent on the beat serving the public and arresting criminals.

“The OPM has also analysed how policing is changing, setting up the force for the future so that it is better placed to tackle crime over the coming years. For example, for the first time, North Yorkshire Police will have a dedicated Cyber Crime Unit. We now need to discuss these proposals with local communities, and ensure they understand what’s needed of a modern and effective police service.”

The OPM has been developed over the past eight months by Assistant Chief Constable Paul Kennedy, and if agreed by the public will be implemented between now and 2016.

Mr Jones said the money had been partly taken from the reserves and by making use of budget underspending.

Comments (9)

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10:03am Wed 11 Jun 14

courier46 says...

Sounds good,all we need now is to shake up our judges our justice system and start giving out real deterrants.Do away with (for example) getting 3 years in jail and been out in 8 months.Some people say jail doesn't work,well I`m sorry but if there in jail there not commiting crimes on innocent people.
Sounds good,all we need now is to shake up our judges our justice system and start giving out real deterrants.Do away with (for example) getting 3 years in jail and been out in 8 months.Some people say jail doesn't work,well I`m sorry but if there in jail there not commiting crimes on innocent people. courier46
  • Score: -22

10:48am Wed 11 Jun 14

YorkPatrol says...

They need to start by looking into the over inflated salaries currently enjoyed by the back office support staff, particularly at the safe haven that is Newby Wiske. There are huge saving to be seen by undertaking simple benchmarking exercises aligning salaries to industry standard based on roles and location
They need to start by looking into the over inflated salaries currently enjoyed by the back office support staff, particularly at the safe haven that is Newby Wiske. There are huge saving to be seen by undertaking simple benchmarking exercises aligning salaries to industry standard based on roles and location YorkPatrol
  • Score: -9

11:20am Wed 11 Jun 14

myselby says...

An £11 Million shake up£ 10 on computers- £1 million on the rest and low and behold results in the closure of Selby custody suite – no doubt the police officers can use the hand held computers whilst they spend hours transporting people to York – great investment in Selby Miss Mulligan -
An £11 Million shake up£ 10 on computers- £1 million on the rest and low and behold results in the closure of Selby custody suite – no doubt the police officers can use the hand held computers whilst they spend hours transporting people to York – great investment in Selby Miss Mulligan - myselby
  • Score: 12

11:53am Wed 11 Jun 14

Dave Ruddock says...

Sounds like the MASONIC POLICE LODGE is at work, Where have the Police on the beat been, were they all on Holiday, I Pads bought in bulk will be cheap, its the Software that will cost,
I still think a National Police Force is better, Same standard of service though out the UK and the cost be national through Councils (put impossible to work or happen)
Sounds like the MASONIC POLICE LODGE is at work, Where have the Police on the beat been, were they all on Holiday, I Pads bought in bulk will be cheap, its the Software that will cost, I still think a National Police Force is better, Same standard of service though out the UK and the cost be national through Councils (put impossible to work or happen) Dave Ruddock
  • Score: 3

5:11pm Wed 11 Jun 14

Caecilius says...

The "elected" Tory political commissar - sorry, commissioner - whose appointment was supported by about 7% of the electorate.
The "elected" Tory political commissar - sorry, commissioner - whose appointment was supported by about 7% of the electorate. Caecilius
  • Score: 9

5:44pm Wed 11 Jun 14

Abisman says...

So this is it, I wondered what the hell she'd actually been doing after being elected. Answer; thinking up a plan to spend £10million on an iPad for every bobby. She had no qualifications for the job; she works in PR and is a school governor. But as it's North Yorkshire where they'd vote in a pig if it wore a blue rosette, we get lumbered with this.
So this is it, I wondered what the hell she'd actually been doing after being elected. Answer; thinking up a plan to spend £10million on an iPad for every bobby. She had no qualifications for the job; she works in PR and is a school governor. But as it's North Yorkshire where they'd vote in a pig if it wore a blue rosette, we get lumbered with this. Abisman
  • Score: 10

6:31pm Wed 11 Jun 14

nottoooldtocare says...

courier46 wrote:
Sounds good,all we need now is to shake up our judges our justice system and start giving out real deterrants.Do away with (for example) getting 3 years in jail and been out in 8 months.Some people say jail doesn't work,well I`m sorry but if there in jail there not commiting crimes on innocent people.
Nail on the head springs to mind. I still can't understand how pleading guilty can get you 2/3 off your sentence. Also, if you go to prison for any length of time, surely the expectation is that you toe the line. Surely the sentence should start (as this is the punishment awarded) from the day of sentencing, not the last 10 months or so that they have been on remand getting pretty much everything thing they want other than liberty.

Judges and court advisers need to get into the real world and understand what it feels like to be burgled or assaulted, to spend time with victims who are not related to the cases they are hearing, this should give them a better sense of how a victim feels.

As for those found guilty, poor behaviour should see sentences increase substantially and parole should disappear. Diet choice be limited to one or two options each day, not cater for ever whim or fad that the inmates have. Prison should try to re educate and help prevent re offending, but once you have the same old faces appearing before the bench time and time again, perhaps it is time to realise that providing "gated" B&B isn't working and ramp it up a level so that it is in their (the offenders) best interests not to want to go down again.

As for the Police, and yes they do get some bad press, but they are out there in the thick of it, trying to do the job despite all the politically correct direction on how to treat offenders with respect etc. It must be very frustrating having offenders with their braces caught on the door handles of the court, with limp wristed official's directing the bench to fine them £30 payable over the rest of their natural life, and to attend 20 hours unpaid work. The unpaid work really meaning sitting in a shed or Portakabin type building doing as little as possible. What happened to the three strikes and out? Unless we make prison the last place you want to be, then what real deterrent is there? Many are better off, and better catered for on the inside than they are on the outside, that can't be right, can it?
[quote][p][bold]courier46[/bold] wrote: Sounds good,all we need now is to shake up our judges our justice system and start giving out real deterrants.Do away with (for example) getting 3 years in jail and been out in 8 months.Some people say jail doesn't work,well I`m sorry but if there in jail there not commiting crimes on innocent people.[/p][/quote]Nail on the head springs to mind. I still can't understand how pleading guilty can get you 2/3 off your sentence. Also, if you go to prison for any length of time, surely the expectation is that you toe the line. Surely the sentence should start (as this is the punishment awarded) from the day of sentencing, not the last 10 months or so that they have been on remand getting pretty much everything thing they want other than liberty. Judges and court advisers need to get into the real world and understand what it feels like to be burgled or assaulted, to spend time with victims who are not related to the cases they are hearing, this should give them a better sense of how a victim feels. As for those found guilty, poor behaviour should see sentences increase substantially and parole should disappear. Diet choice be limited to one or two options each day, not cater for ever whim or fad that the inmates have. Prison should try to re educate and help prevent re offending, but once you have the same old faces appearing before the bench time and time again, perhaps it is time to realise that providing "gated" B&B isn't working and ramp it up a level so that it is in their (the offenders) best interests not to want to go down again. As for the Police, and yes they do get some bad press, but they are out there in the thick of it, trying to do the job despite all the politically correct direction on how to treat offenders with respect etc. It must be very frustrating having offenders with their braces caught on the door handles of the court, with limp wristed official's directing the bench to fine them £30 payable over the rest of their natural life, and to attend 20 hours unpaid work. The unpaid work really meaning sitting in a shed or Portakabin type building doing as little as possible. What happened to the three strikes and out? Unless we make prison the last place you want to be, then what real deterrent is there? Many are better off, and better catered for on the inside than they are on the outside, that can't be right, can it? nottoooldtocare
  • Score: 10

8:50pm Wed 11 Jun 14

the-e-man says...

nottoooldtocare wrote:
courier46 wrote:
Sounds good,all we need now is to shake up our judges our justice system and start giving out real deterrants.Do away with (for example) getting 3 years in jail and been out in 8 months.Some people say jail doesn't work,well I`m sorry but if there in jail there not commiting crimes on innocent people.
Nail on the head springs to mind. I still can't understand how pleading guilty can get you 2/3 off your sentence. Also, if you go to prison for any length of time, surely the expectation is that you toe the line. Surely the sentence should start (as this is the punishment awarded) from the day of sentencing, not the last 10 months or so that they have been on remand getting pretty much everything thing they want other than liberty.

Judges and court advisers need to get into the real world and understand what it feels like to be burgled or assaulted, to spend time with victims who are not related to the cases they are hearing, this should give them a better sense of how a victim feels.

As for those found guilty, poor behaviour should see sentences increase substantially and parole should disappear. Diet choice be limited to one or two options each day, not cater for ever whim or fad that the inmates have. Prison should try to re educate and help prevent re offending, but once you have the same old faces appearing before the bench time and time again, perhaps it is time to realise that providing "gated" B&B isn't working and ramp it up a level so that it is in their (the offenders) best interests not to want to go down again.

As for the Police, and yes they do get some bad press, but they are out there in the thick of it, trying to do the job despite all the politically correct direction on how to treat offenders with respect etc. It must be very frustrating having offenders with their braces caught on the door handles of the court, with limp wristed official's directing the bench to fine them £30 payable over the rest of their natural life, and to attend 20 hours unpaid work. The unpaid work really meaning sitting in a shed or Portakabin type building doing as little as possible. What happened to the three strikes and out? Unless we make prison the last place you want to be, then what real deterrent is there? Many are better off, and better catered for on the inside than they are on the outside, that can't be right, can it?
I could not agree more BUT , unfortunately, this country cannot afford to punish people effectively under the constraints that we have to work under.
To keep someone in prison costs £30K plus per annum. The courts ( judges and magistrates) are under directions from the government not to send people to prison if at all possible. Early release and tagging help to keep the prison population down. Pleading "guilty" to earn a discount on sentence is there purely to save Court time and therefore save money. I stand corrected but I believe that community service is regarded as a custodial sentence on the grounds that it restricts a person liberty !
The government can only spend what money it has. The last Labour government showed us what happens if they spend money they do not have.
A total review is required on what OUR government spends OUR money on but, for example, it would be a brave political party to propose cutting state benefits to fund an increase in the prison population.
One state benefit I think should be looked at is the Disability Allowance. It has now got to the stage where the only people who can afford to drive a new car are the wealthy, those driving a company car or those in receipt of DLA. I know of people who claim DLA who are no more disabled than I am .
Rewarding people who have large families is, in my view, immoral and invariably leads to "problem families". It also costs a lot of tax payers money.
The rules relating to unemployment benefit are a step in the right direction and hopefully will help in reducing claims even further.
Having said all that who is to say that money saved on paying out state benefits would be used to fund an effective prison system. I am sure that all the well funded "do gooders" would have a big say in that.
I agree that prison should be tougher but, again, that calls for a whole rethink on how the prisons are run. Unfortunately we have in this country several large well paid organisations who have effectively made prison a very soft alternative to punishment. The first thing I would start with is do away with the myth that repeat offenders can be rehabilitated. That theory may be OK for first time offenders but repeat offenders should be put in prison as a punishment and to stop them committing more crime.
Of course almost everybody agrees that the whole sentence should be served with no time off for good behaviour only time added on for bad behaviour.
With regards the role the police play in all this, they have no say in it whatsoever. They are directed by the CPS who have the final say on whether a prosecution can be brought and in any case can only apply the laws as passed by Parliament. They have no say in sentencing. It is my view that the Police (and the public) have been let down over the years by senior officers who think more about their careers than speaking the truth.
However, no amounting of ranting by the ordinary man in the street will do any good because we have no proper and legitimate political party who is prepared to listen. Even our present Prime Minister once advocated "Hugging a Hoody"
[quote][p][bold]nottoooldtocare[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]courier46[/bold] wrote: Sounds good,all we need now is to shake up our judges our justice system and start giving out real deterrants.Do away with (for example) getting 3 years in jail and been out in 8 months.Some people say jail doesn't work,well I`m sorry but if there in jail there not commiting crimes on innocent people.[/p][/quote]Nail on the head springs to mind. I still can't understand how pleading guilty can get you 2/3 off your sentence. Also, if you go to prison for any length of time, surely the expectation is that you toe the line. Surely the sentence should start (as this is the punishment awarded) from the day of sentencing, not the last 10 months or so that they have been on remand getting pretty much everything thing they want other than liberty. Judges and court advisers need to get into the real world and understand what it feels like to be burgled or assaulted, to spend time with victims who are not related to the cases they are hearing, this should give them a better sense of how a victim feels. As for those found guilty, poor behaviour should see sentences increase substantially and parole should disappear. Diet choice be limited to one or two options each day, not cater for ever whim or fad that the inmates have. Prison should try to re educate and help prevent re offending, but once you have the same old faces appearing before the bench time and time again, perhaps it is time to realise that providing "gated" B&B isn't working and ramp it up a level so that it is in their (the offenders) best interests not to want to go down again. As for the Police, and yes they do get some bad press, but they are out there in the thick of it, trying to do the job despite all the politically correct direction on how to treat offenders with respect etc. It must be very frustrating having offenders with their braces caught on the door handles of the court, with limp wristed official's directing the bench to fine them £30 payable over the rest of their natural life, and to attend 20 hours unpaid work. The unpaid work really meaning sitting in a shed or Portakabin type building doing as little as possible. What happened to the three strikes and out? Unless we make prison the last place you want to be, then what real deterrent is there? Many are better off, and better catered for on the inside than they are on the outside, that can't be right, can it?[/p][/quote]I could not agree more BUT , unfortunately, this country cannot afford to punish people effectively under the constraints that we have to work under. To keep someone in prison costs £30K plus per annum. The courts ( judges and magistrates) are under directions from the government not to send people to prison if at all possible. Early release and tagging help to keep the prison population down. Pleading "guilty" to earn a discount on sentence is there purely to save Court time and therefore save money. I stand corrected but I believe that community service is regarded as a custodial sentence on the grounds that it restricts a person liberty ! The government can only spend what money it has. The last Labour government showed us what happens if they spend money they do not have. A total review is required on what OUR government spends OUR money on but, for example, it would be a brave political party to propose cutting state benefits to fund an increase in the prison population. One state benefit I think should be looked at is the Disability Allowance. It has now got to the stage where the only people who can afford to drive a new car are the wealthy, those driving a company car or those in receipt of DLA. I know of people who claim DLA who are no more disabled than I am . Rewarding people who have large families is, in my view, immoral and invariably leads to "problem families". It also costs a lot of tax payers money. The rules relating to unemployment benefit are a step in the right direction and hopefully will help in reducing claims even further. Having said all that who is to say that money saved on paying out state benefits would be used to fund an effective prison system. I am sure that all the well funded "do gooders" would have a big say in that. I agree that prison should be tougher but, again, that calls for a whole rethink on how the prisons are run. Unfortunately we have in this country several large well paid organisations who have effectively made prison a very soft alternative to punishment. The first thing I would start with is do away with the myth that repeat offenders can be rehabilitated. That theory may be OK for first time offenders but repeat offenders should be put in prison as a punishment and to stop them committing more crime. Of course almost everybody agrees that the whole sentence should be served with no time off for good behaviour only time added on for bad behaviour. With regards the role the police play in all this, they have no say in it whatsoever. They are directed by the CPS who have the final say on whether a prosecution can be brought and in any case can only apply the laws as passed by Parliament. They have no say in sentencing. It is my view that the Police (and the public) have been let down over the years by senior officers who think more about their careers than speaking the truth. However, no amounting of ranting by the ordinary man in the street will do any good because we have no proper and legitimate political party who is prepared to listen. Even our present Prime Minister once advocated "Hugging a Hoody" the-e-man
  • Score: 4

8:59pm Wed 11 Jun 14

trailblazer says...

Does this mean they will patrol alone and not standing about in groups, at present they are like grapes only come in bunches will be nice to see them on their own and not holding each others hand but seeing is believing.
Does this mean they will patrol alone and not standing about in groups, at present they are like grapes only come in bunches will be nice to see them on their own and not holding each others hand but seeing is believing. trailblazer
  • Score: -1

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