Exam reforms "patently unfair", says York head

Exam reforms "patently unfair", says York head

David Ellis, head teacher of York High

Coun James Alexander (left) with visitors to the York Fairness Conference at York University (left) Kate Green MP, Debbie Abrahams MP, Sophie Jowett,Henk Kool (Vice mayor social affairs,Employment and Economy in the Netherlands), and Kate Pickett (prof Yo

First published in News
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THOUSANDS of York's most disadvantaged children face being hindered even more by proposed education reforms, one of the city's head teachers has warned.

David Ellis, head at York High in Acomb, urged Education Secretary Michael Gove to reconsider calls to put more emphasis on exams.

He said he welcomed Mr Gove's determination to secure better outcomes for disadvantaged children, outlined in a speech on Saturday, but said increased exam focus could be damaging.

Speaking at yesterday's York Fairness Conference, Mr Ellis said he did not want easier assessments and was happy being held to account, but said: "A system which is based increasingly on examination, which doesn’t recognise the challenges of vulnerable young people, the issues of building confidence and self-esteem and the mental health timebomb which is ticking in the background, is patently unfair.

"We are in danger of creating an education system that is even more unfair and potentially divisive."

He said he had rarely met a child who did not want to succeed, nor a parent who didn't want the best for their child, and said challenging behaviour or lack of parental support were symptoms of a problem, of its cause.

He said the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with.

"It is no surprise they will at times react negatively to their school experience. It is also fairly obvious that the young people from backgrounds where they have had little access toreading, minimal cultural capital and little practical support from parents (who may have themselves failed) and who are frightened of the future are most likely to fail."

Mr Ellis was joined in his presentation by three Year 10 students: Megan Steel, Josh Jackson and Edward Bagnall.

Megan said many teenagers struggled with low self-esteem but were ambitious, and said too many people dismissed children as "a waste of space, lazy or uncaring"

She added: "Why, when we are putting more and more pressure on young people, are we reducing the amount of support available for them, particularly in the area of mental health? In my school we are lucky that we do have access to caring staff and a specialist counsellor but many other young people don’t."

Josh said additional costs, such as for school trips, were a burden for many families and created inequality, and also said many families could only afford a holiday if they broke the law by going in term-time.

Edward highlighted the onerous cost of some schools' uniforms and the stigma that pupils could feel if they were visibly receiving free school meals or could not afford to pay contributions to costs such as art supplies.

Mr Ellis and the students were speaking at the Ron Cooke Hub at the University of York, where City of York Council hosted York's first Fairness Conference yesterday, following a recommendation from the York Fairness Commission.

A Department for Education spokesman said: "We are determined to give all children in this country the very best education. That is why we are reforming exams to make them more reigorous and demanding, in line with the world's leading education systems.

"They will meet the demands of universities and employers - giving all young people the skills the need to succeed."

_________________________

POLITICIANS, academics, school children and charity campaigners were among the delegates for York's first Fairness Conference.

In one of the keynote morning speeches, the Archbishop of York Dr John Sentamu said Britain's wage gap must be narrowed, calling income inequality "a giant that must be slayed".

He said politicians had overwhelmingly welcomed The Spirit Level, a 2009 book on equality, but said: "What have they done about it? Platitudes, platitudes, platitudes."

In the afternoon, speaker Stacy Bostock told how she had battled through poverty and loneliness, and said far too many people were not getting the help they needed, and Tracey Robbins from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation spoke of the desperation that poverty and loneliness can cause.

York Central MP Hugh Bayley said that despite austerity cuts, local and national Government still had "enormous resources" to tackle poverty. He said efforts should be focused on the poorest of the poor, and warned against slipping between the ideas of poverty and fairness.

City council chief executive Kersten England called for boldness, while The Joseph Rowntree Foundation's chief executive Julia Unwin said it was vital that economic growth did not leave the most vulnerable behind.

Alan Walker, from Sheffield's Fairness Commission, called for a minister of social justice, to drive a national agenda for fairness.

City council leader James Alexander said he was driven by the desire for fairness and the council would continue to work to tackle poverty and inequality, but visiting speaker Henk Kool, deputy mayor of The Hague, said much of the conference had been too abstract with too much deliberation on the known problems. He said: "I was a little disappointed. What will we do about it?"

Comments (16)

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2:59pm Tue 10 Jun 14

Happytoliveinyork says...

Say.........cheese!
Say.........cheese! Happytoliveinyork
  • Score: 8

3:12pm Tue 10 Jun 14

york_chap says...

Doing well in exams requires effort, concentration and hard work - that's your problem right there. It's an unfortunate reality that these concepts are alien to a lot of young people these days, exacerbated by the fact that their parents/family do little or nothing to promote the virtues of working hard and doing well at school.

Dumbing down the curriculum in an attempt to level the playing field isn't fair to the majority of young people who do appreiate the benefits of taking school seriously and who perform very well in their exams.
Doing well in exams requires effort, concentration and hard work - that's your problem right there. It's an unfortunate reality that these concepts are alien to a lot of young people these days, exacerbated by the fact that their parents/family do little or nothing to promote the virtues of working hard and doing well at school. Dumbing down the curriculum in an attempt to level the playing field isn't fair to the majority of young people who do appreiate the benefits of taking school seriously and who perform very well in their exams. york_chap
  • Score: 7

3:42pm Tue 10 Jun 14

nottoooldtocare says...

Another hot topic put forward by The Press, and some interesting assumptions that I don't entirely agree with.

David Ellis said "the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with".

I suspect that there will be as many if not more mental health issues with some of those at schools like Eton (or St Peters, Bootham et al) as many of the little darlings are too far removed from reality. In many cases they are third or fourth generation that have also benefited from forefathers success. If I went to say Beckfield Lane or Ashfield schools, should I have low self esteem or mental health issues? Absolute tosh, you learn to make the best of what you can and work for it.

The sad reality is that many children leave school without basic academic or life skills. Yes they all pass exams, all too often mum and dad help to "google" the answers and add the finer points to the work to help with the grades. but what are they really worth? Take away the calculator and they unable to do basic maths, times tables are a thing of the past. Spelling and grammar is dire without the use of spell check (even with it sometimes).
The arrival of the electronic world has provided significant advances in many areas, but equally we are now seeing the impact or effect of the young spending hours in their bedrooms on-line or gaming, as many have lost the ability to communicative with older people. In 20 years time we will be crying out for tradesmen/women as (from my observations) the creativity of building dens, go carts, building or rebuilding bikes and motorcycles is fast disappearing. There doesn't appear to be either the interest or the aptitude for this. How many kids know how to repair a puncture these days? I've watch a few try they don't even know how to use spanners and sockets; or the pump!.
Going to university used to set people apart (nothing to do with your background either), having a degree 25 years ago meant something, you had achieved things others couldn't. Now, in many organisations you wouldn't get an interview without a degree, and many applicants have two degrees, they still can't spell and need excel to do basic maths!

Achieving results is about application, it's about wanting to learn, it is about listening and watching. Unfortunately life is also about learning to live with success and failure. If more people were prepared to start lower down the ladder in life, and understand what , why and how decisions are made, they would know so much more than those who wave a 2:2 degree and want to be on the top of the ladder straight away.

Me? I left school with nothing or any note (low grade CSE's), but I've got a family and a home. How did I do this? I listened to and watched those who new more and asked questions. I went back to college I saved and I wanted to achieve my own goals. If I didn't know the answer I admitted it, I didn't try to dupe others into thinking I knew more than I did. It's time to stop making excuses for people failing, it happens, get over it and move on, whatever your background.
Another hot topic put forward by The Press, and some interesting assumptions that I don't entirely agree with. David Ellis said "the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with". I suspect that there will be as many if not more mental health issues with some of those at schools like Eton (or St Peters, Bootham et al) as many of the little darlings are too far removed from reality. In many cases they are third or fourth generation that have also benefited from forefathers success. If I went to say Beckfield Lane or Ashfield schools, should I have low self esteem or mental health issues? Absolute tosh, you learn to make the best of what you can and work for it. The sad reality is that many children leave school without basic academic or life skills. Yes they all pass exams, all too often mum and dad help to "google" the answers and add the finer points to the work to help with the grades. but what are they really worth? Take away the calculator and they unable to do basic maths, times tables are a thing of the past. Spelling and grammar is dire without the use of spell check (even with it sometimes). The arrival of the electronic world has provided significant advances in many areas, but equally we are now seeing the impact or effect of the young spending hours in their bedrooms on-line or gaming, as many have lost the ability to communicative with older people. In 20 years time we will be crying out for tradesmen/women as (from my observations) the creativity of building dens, go carts, building or rebuilding bikes and motorcycles is fast disappearing. There doesn't appear to be either the interest or the aptitude for this. How many kids know how to repair a puncture these days? I've watch a few try they don't even know how to use spanners and sockets; or the pump!. Going to university used to set people apart (nothing to do with your background either), having a degree 25 years ago meant something, you had achieved things others couldn't. Now, in many organisations you wouldn't get an interview without a degree, and many applicants have two degrees, they still can't spell and need excel to do basic maths! Achieving results is about application, it's about wanting to learn, it is about listening and watching. Unfortunately life is also about learning to live with success and failure. If more people were prepared to start lower down the ladder in life, and understand what , why and how decisions are made, they would know so much more than those who wave a 2:2 degree and want to be on the top of the ladder straight away. Me? I left school with nothing or any note (low grade CSE's), but I've got a family and a home. How did I do this? I listened to and watched those who new more and asked questions. I went back to college I saved and I wanted to achieve my own goals. If I didn't know the answer I admitted it, I didn't try to dupe others into thinking I knew more than I did. It's time to stop making excuses for people failing, it happens, get over it and move on, whatever your background. nottoooldtocare
  • Score: 15

3:55pm Tue 10 Jun 14

MouseHouse says...

Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it.

These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.
Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it. These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE. MouseHouse
  • Score: 1

4:11pm Tue 10 Jun 14

JHardacre says...

MouseHouse wrote:
Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it.

These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.
You obviously haven't looked at any recent exam papers.
[quote][p][bold]MouseHouse[/bold] wrote: Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it. These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.[/p][/quote]You obviously haven't looked at any recent exam papers. JHardacre
  • Score: 0

4:42pm Tue 10 Jun 14

PKH says...

Yes some pupils are lazy, however there are a good number that are not very good academically who would be good at worthwhile not so academic subjects such joinery, building etc. who would work very hard at such. To force academic exams on these does lower their self esteem.
Yes some pupils are lazy, however there are a good number that are not very good academically who would be good at worthwhile not so academic subjects such joinery, building etc. who would work very hard at such. To force academic exams on these does lower their self esteem. PKH
  • Score: 6

5:08pm Tue 10 Jun 14

York City Blues says...

11 years of schooling crammed into a 2 hour exam !

Some people aren't good when it comes to exams and some people are.

It seems only fair to me that people get the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding through other means also.
11 years of schooling crammed into a 2 hour exam ! Some people aren't good when it comes to exams and some people are. It seems only fair to me that people get the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding through other means also. York City Blues
  • Score: 0

5:11pm Tue 10 Jun 14

Digeorge says...

"He said the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with."

Given that I am not typical Eton and neither typical High School but privately educated in 'Harrogate', but can concur with some of the views about medical conditions and mental health conditions. Assessment based on solely exams is disadvantageous, I have a crap memory due to a complex medical condition but do extremely well in coursework. I have done astonishingly well in my current degree and the balance suits me well of 40/60.

To say I would agree with some of it would be correct like disadvantaged those who have medical conditions and also mental health problems.

An assessment based purely on exams has always disadvantaged me. But self-esteem if you always have doctors saying 'learning difficulties' or teachers saying 'learning difficulties' and parents saying 'learning difficulties' it is very hard to get out of that rut!! But hey ho, learning difficulties to me is now just a big joke!
"He said the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with." Given that I am not typical Eton and neither typical High School but privately educated in 'Harrogate', but can concur with some of the views about medical conditions and mental health conditions. Assessment based on solely exams is disadvantageous, I have a crap memory due to a complex medical condition but do extremely well in coursework. I have done astonishingly well in my current degree and the balance suits me well of 40/60. To say I would agree with some of it would be correct like disadvantaged those who have medical conditions and also mental health problems. An assessment based purely on exams has always disadvantaged me. But self-esteem if you always have doctors saying 'learning difficulties' or teachers saying 'learning difficulties' and parents saying 'learning difficulties' it is very hard to get out of that rut!! But hey ho, learning difficulties to me is now just a big joke! Digeorge
  • Score: 1

5:33pm Tue 10 Jun 14

nearlyman says...

But exams are the ultimate level playing field. Just the student and the questions. No pushy parents. No over enthusiastic teachers. ( A reconstruction of a quote I saw recently.....)As long as the aforementioned have shown the pupils where to look, they,in turn, show their aptitude by being able to find the answers.
But exams are the ultimate level playing field. Just the student and the questions. No pushy parents. No over enthusiastic teachers. ( A reconstruction of a quote I saw recently.....)As long as the aforementioned have shown the pupils where to look, they,in turn, show their aptitude by being able to find the answers. nearlyman
  • Score: 3

7:52pm Tue 10 Jun 14

MouseHouse says...

JHardacre wrote:
MouseHouse wrote:
Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it.

These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.
You obviously haven't looked at any recent exam papers.
In the past couple of years I have seen a good couple of dozen GCSE papers in a variety of topics.

As I say, they're a memory test.
[quote][p][bold]JHardacre[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MouseHouse[/bold] wrote: Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it. These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.[/p][/quote]You obviously haven't looked at any recent exam papers.[/p][/quote]In the past couple of years I have seen a good couple of dozen GCSE papers in a variety of topics. As I say, they're a memory test. MouseHouse
  • Score: 0

7:57pm Tue 10 Jun 14

Jack Ham says...

I wonder how much this 'fairness conference' cost us taxpayers of York?

I understand the panels were made up of labour councillors from across UK, left wing politicians from overseas and the labour MP Hugh Bailey.

The non-politicians were the glitterati of the left, Kersten England, Julia Unwin, Kate Pickett et al accompanied by John Sentamu (who's church has been and continues to be responsible for more inequality than many could dream up in a lifetime)

So......with so much effort and expense put in, two simple questions.

How much did it cost?
How did it benefit York residents?

I expect a resounding silence.
I wonder how much this 'fairness conference' cost us taxpayers of York? I understand the panels were made up of labour councillors from across UK, left wing politicians from overseas and the labour MP Hugh Bailey. The non-politicians were the glitterati of the left, Kersten England, Julia Unwin, Kate Pickett et al accompanied by John Sentamu (who's church has been and continues to be responsible for more inequality than many could dream up in a lifetime) So......with so much effort and expense put in, two simple questions. How much did it cost? How did it benefit York residents? I expect a resounding silence. Jack Ham
  • Score: -40

8:06pm Tue 10 Jun 14

MouseHouse says...

JHardacre wrote:
MouseHouse wrote:
Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it.

These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.
You obviously haven't looked at any recent exam papers.
IN fact there are currently fifteen past papers from lat year on my desktop - Biology, Physics and Chemistry.

A big memory test.
[quote][p][bold]JHardacre[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MouseHouse[/bold] wrote: Exams are a memory test. That is all they are. How much of the data we have given you over the course can you spit out onto paper in ninety minutes? Data is everywhere, there's this thing called the internet that is full of it. The new skill is identifying which is right or wrong, which is of vlsue and how to apply it. These sit down in a row exams and sit there in silence are OUT OF DATE.[/p][/quote]You obviously haven't looked at any recent exam papers.[/p][/quote]IN fact there are currently fifteen past papers from lat year on my desktop - Biology, Physics and Chemistry. A big memory test. MouseHouse
  • Score: -1

8:07pm Tue 10 Jun 14

3.8liter says...

nottoooldtocare wrote:
Another hot topic put forward by The Press, and some interesting assumptions that I don't entirely agree with.

David Ellis said "the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with".

I suspect that there will be as many if not more mental health issues with some of those at schools like Eton (or St Peters, Bootham et al) as many of the little darlings are too far removed from reality. In many cases they are third or fourth generation that have also benefited from forefathers success. If I went to say Beckfield Lane or Ashfield schools, should I have low self esteem or mental health issues? Absolute tosh, you learn to make the best of what you can and work for it.

The sad reality is that many children leave school without basic academic or life skills. Yes they all pass exams, all too often mum and dad help to "google" the answers and add the finer points to the work to help with the grades. but what are they really worth? Take away the calculator and they unable to do basic maths, times tables are a thing of the past. Spelling and grammar is dire without the use of spell check (even with it sometimes).
The arrival of the electronic world has provided significant advances in many areas, but equally we are now seeing the impact or effect of the young spending hours in their bedrooms on-line or gaming, as many have lost the ability to communicative with older people. In 20 years time we will be crying out for tradesmen/women as (from my observations) the creativity of building dens, go carts, building or rebuilding bikes and motorcycles is fast disappearing. There doesn't appear to be either the interest or the aptitude for this. How many kids know how to repair a puncture these days? I've watch a few try they don't even know how to use spanners and sockets; or the pump!.
Going to university used to set people apart (nothing to do with your background either), having a degree 25 years ago meant something, you had achieved things others couldn't. Now, in many organisations you wouldn't get an interview without a degree, and many applicants have two degrees, they still can't spell and need excel to do basic maths!

Achieving results is about application, it's about wanting to learn, it is about listening and watching. Unfortunately life is also about learning to live with success and failure. If more people were prepared to start lower down the ladder in life, and understand what , why and how decisions are made, they would know so much more than those who wave a 2:2 degree and want to be on the top of the ladder straight away.

Me? I left school with nothing or any note (low grade CSE's), but I've got a family and a home. How did I do this? I listened to and watched those who new more and asked questions. I went back to college I saved and I wanted to achieve my own goals. If I didn't know the answer I admitted it, I didn't try to dupe others into thinking I knew more than I did. It's time to stop making excuses for people failing, it happens, get over it and move on, whatever your background.
I was thing of commenting on the Press write-up, but you've said it all for me. I couldn't agree more with you.
[quote][p][bold]nottoooldtocare[/bold] wrote: Another hot topic put forward by The Press, and some interesting assumptions that I don't entirely agree with. David Ellis said "the difference between typical York High students and typical Eton students was only self-esteem and said: "It seems fairly obvious to me that a young person with a challenging background, mental health issues, low self-esteem or a learning difficulty is likely to find an assessment system based solely on exams and memory, which relies heavily on revision skills, difficult to cope with". I suspect that there will be as many if not more mental health issues with some of those at schools like Eton (or St Peters, Bootham et al) as many of the little darlings are too far removed from reality. In many cases they are third or fourth generation that have also benefited from forefathers success. If I went to say Beckfield Lane or Ashfield schools, should I have low self esteem or mental health issues? Absolute tosh, you learn to make the best of what you can and work for it. The sad reality is that many children leave school without basic academic or life skills. Yes they all pass exams, all too often mum and dad help to "google" the answers and add the finer points to the work to help with the grades. but what are they really worth? Take away the calculator and they unable to do basic maths, times tables are a thing of the past. Spelling and grammar is dire without the use of spell check (even with it sometimes). The arrival of the electronic world has provided significant advances in many areas, but equally we are now seeing the impact or effect of the young spending hours in their bedrooms on-line or gaming, as many have lost the ability to communicative with older people. In 20 years time we will be crying out for tradesmen/women as (from my observations) the creativity of building dens, go carts, building or rebuilding bikes and motorcycles is fast disappearing. There doesn't appear to be either the interest or the aptitude for this. How many kids know how to repair a puncture these days? I've watch a few try they don't even know how to use spanners and sockets; or the pump!. Going to university used to set people apart (nothing to do with your background either), having a degree 25 years ago meant something, you had achieved things others couldn't. Now, in many organisations you wouldn't get an interview without a degree, and many applicants have two degrees, they still can't spell and need excel to do basic maths! Achieving results is about application, it's about wanting to learn, it is about listening and watching. Unfortunately life is also about learning to live with success and failure. If more people were prepared to start lower down the ladder in life, and understand what , why and how decisions are made, they would know so much more than those who wave a 2:2 degree and want to be on the top of the ladder straight away. Me? I left school with nothing or any note (low grade CSE's), but I've got a family and a home. How did I do this? I listened to and watched those who new more and asked questions. I went back to college I saved and I wanted to achieve my own goals. If I didn't know the answer I admitted it, I didn't try to dupe others into thinking I knew more than I did. It's time to stop making excuses for people failing, it happens, get over it and move on, whatever your background.[/p][/quote]I was thing of commenting on the Press write-up, but you've said it all for me. I couldn't agree more with you. 3.8liter
  • Score: 2

6:30am Wed 11 Jun 14

thinkingoutsidethebox says...

would be so nice to believe that the only difference between these two groups was self esteem alone...........ther
e is one resounding unmentioned difference. MONEY. Mummy and daddy can do a lot for you if they have money - either by buying it for you, paying for it or introducing you to someone on the old boy system.
would be so nice to believe that the only difference between these two groups was self esteem alone...........ther e is one resounding unmentioned difference. MONEY. Mummy and daddy can do a lot for you if they have money - either by buying it for you, paying for it or introducing you to someone on the old boy system. thinkingoutsidethebox
  • Score: 0

9:01am Wed 11 Jun 14

Digeorge says...

One thing about exams is that you can buy books 'how to pass GCSE with the regurgitated answer'. There are plenty of them out there.

Coursework however is unique to its own and has at University a large element of unique research. Plagurism monitor is rife and if found copying, cheating you will be disciplined.

As for Eton versus the High School, it is money, it is money and also the social class of the background, professional background or not.
One thing about exams is that you can buy books 'how to pass GCSE with the regurgitated answer'. There are plenty of them out there. Coursework however is unique to its own and has at University a large element of unique research. Plagurism monitor is rife and if found copying, cheating you will be disciplined. As for Eton versus the High School, it is money, it is money and also the social class of the background, professional background or not. Digeorge
  • Score: -2

9:40am Wed 11 Jun 14

the-e-man says...

Course work is one big cop out.
I witnessed a supervisor in the office I then worked in coerce a university graduate new to the office to complete his son's geography course work that went towards his GCSE.
I saw it and can only imagine this and lots more goes on around the country.
Exams are the only true way to test a student.
Whether those exams are on some broader based less academic subjects is another arguement.
Course work is one big cop out. I witnessed a supervisor in the office I then worked in coerce a university graduate new to the office to complete his son's geography course work that went towards his GCSE. I saw it and can only imagine this and lots more goes on around the country. Exams are the only true way to test a student. Whether those exams are on some broader based less academic subjects is another arguement. the-e-man
  • Score: 3

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