No extra space for bikes on train carriages during Le Tour

No extra space for bikes on train carriages during Le Tour

No extra space for bikes on train carriages during Le Tour

Updated in News

INCREASED rail services during the Grand Depart will not include any extra provision for cyclists.

While large numbers are expected to flock to York for the opening stages of the Tour de France, train companies have stated they will be "strictly enforcing bike policy" and there will be no extra cycle carriages across the Grand Depart weekend of July 5 and 6.

On Northern Rail services, two bikes per train will be allowed but this will be at the conductor's discretion, and spaces cannot be reserved. A spokesman for the company urged rail users and cyclists to "take a sensible approach" and "try to avoid bringing bikes onto busy trains".

Similarly, Grand Central will be running normal services and "strongly advise" customers not to bring their bike as reservations are not allowed and there is limited space available.

First Transpennine will be running extra train services throughout the weekend to accommodate the number of visitors, but will not be increasing the capacity for cyclists.

A spokesman said: "We are actively seeking opportunities to increase capacity further but to ensure that we carry as many people as possible we will be strictly enforcing our bike policy. Only two bikes per train will be carried and customers wishing to take bikes on board are advised they will need to book in advance, where availability exists. Unfortunately we will not be able to carry unreserved bikes over the Tour weekend."

City of York council is still finalising plans for cycling provision during the weekend but there will be increased bike bank facilities at hub areas such as the railway station or the University. According to the council they expect large numbers to travel by bike and a full transport map is being developed which will be released before the event.

Comments (28)

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10:28am Thu 5 Jun 14

notmyrealname says...

As driving to York does not appear to be an option surely a large number of cyclists will arrive by train . Just another example of lack of foresight by someone.
As driving to York does not appear to be an option surely a large number of cyclists will arrive by train . Just another example of lack of foresight by someone. notmyrealname
  • Score: 30

10:29am Thu 5 Jun 14

JHardacre says...

"According to the council they expect large numbers to travel by bike... "

But not by train and bike, obviously. So if you are coming any distance you're in for a long ride. Don't expect this council to provide additional car parking spaces for anyone who wants to drive and bring their bike.
"According to the council they expect large numbers to travel by bike... " But not by train and bike, obviously. So if you are coming any distance you're in for a long ride. Don't expect this council to provide additional car parking spaces for anyone who wants to drive and bring their bike. JHardacre
  • Score: 14

10:40am Thu 5 Jun 14

Garrowby Turnoff says...

NCREASED rail services during the Grand Depart will not include any extra provision for cyclists.
FCS.There's enough cheating going on as it is without some of the competitors using the train.
[quote]NCREASED rail services during the Grand Depart will not include any extra provision for cyclists.[/quote]FCS.There's enough cheating going on as it is without some of the competitors using the train. Garrowby Turnoff
  • Score: -2

10:46am Thu 5 Jun 14

mjgyork says...

Does anyone really expect the rail companies to take the needs of passengers into consideration any more? Get real!
Does anyone really expect the rail companies to take the needs of passengers into consideration any more? Get real! mjgyork
  • Score: 5

11:04am Thu 5 Jun 14

BL2 says...

They're got bikes? What do they need a train for?! :-)
They're got bikes? What do they need a train for?! :-) BL2
  • Score: 18

11:10am Thu 5 Jun 14

Bad magic says...

Garrowby Turnoff wrote:
NCREASED rail services during the Grand Depart will not include any extra provision for cyclists.
FCS.There's enough cheating going on as it is without some of the competitors using the train.
Tea hit screen. Well played, sir.
[quote][p][bold]Garrowby Turnoff[/bold] wrote: [quote]NCREASED rail services during the Grand Depart will not include any extra provision for cyclists.[/quote]FCS.There's enough cheating going on as it is without some of the competitors using the train.[/p][/quote]Tea hit screen. Well played, sir. Bad magic
  • Score: -9

11:23am Thu 5 Jun 14

Yorkie41 says...

Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.
Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me. Yorkie41
  • Score: -2

12:44pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Meirion M says...

BL2 wrote:
They're got bikes? What do they need a train for?! :-)
Yes.
Bike riders and owners should cycle around, not use pulblc transport.
[quote][p][bold]BL2[/bold] wrote: They're got bikes? What do they need a train for?! :-)[/p][/quote]Yes. Bike riders and owners should cycle around, not use pulblc transport. Meirion M
  • Score: -20

1:08pm Thu 5 Jun 14

GBTYZ says...

Yorkie41 wrote:
Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.
and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear
[quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.[/p][/quote]and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear GBTYZ
  • Score: 5

1:42pm Thu 5 Jun 14

york_chap says...

Well if they can get money from a paying passenger, why would they want that space taken up by a bike instead?

In all seriousness, most people coming from further afield will come by car, and those bringing bikes will just fix them on the back or roof of their vehicle. That's a far cheaper and much more convenient way to get to York and allows you freedom of travel once here.

I do feel sorry for those who have to rely on public transport; being a car-user really makes me appreciate how expensive, slow and inconvenient public transport is when I do use it.
Well if they can get money from a paying passenger, why would they want that space taken up by a bike instead? In all seriousness, most people coming from further afield will come by car, and those bringing bikes will just fix them on the back or roof of their vehicle. That's a far cheaper and much more convenient way to get to York and allows you freedom of travel once here. I do feel sorry for those who have to rely on public transport; being a car-user really makes me appreciate how expensive, slow and inconvenient public transport is when I do use it. york_chap
  • Score: 14

1:50pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Kiwi2 says...

Only 2 bike spaces per train? And most train companies don't allow these precious spaces to be booked. Come on Pedalling Paul - surely this deserves attention!
Only 2 bike spaces per train? And most train companies don't allow these precious spaces to be booked. Come on Pedalling Paul - surely this deserves attention! Kiwi2
  • Score: 12

1:51pm Thu 5 Jun 14

m dee says...

GBTYZ wrote:
Yorkie41 wrote:
Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.
and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear
I would suggest you engage your own brain first what does ( talking about the shut up ) mean.
[quote][p][bold]GBTYZ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.[/p][/quote]and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear[/p][/quote]I would suggest you engage your own brain first what does ( talking about the shut up ) mean. m dee
  • Score: -7

1:59pm Thu 5 Jun 14

mitch2nd says...

yarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn

borrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrring

who give a 'S' lets get it over with even Harrogate does not want this and most of York dont either,
yarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn borrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrring who give a 'S' lets get it over with even Harrogate does not want this and most of York dont either, mitch2nd
  • Score: 3

2:53pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Yorkie41 says...

GBTYZ wrote:
Yorkie41 wrote:
Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.
and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear
GBTYZ perhaps there is no such thing on the railways now, but for your information there used to be a coach on the back of every every train that was half coach half van for the carrying off goods and services, even Royal mail used them.
[quote][p][bold]GBTYZ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.[/p][/quote]and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear[/p][/quote]GBTYZ perhaps there is no such thing on the railways now, but for your information there used to be a coach on the back of every every train that was half coach half van for the carrying off goods and services, even Royal mail used them. Yorkie41
  • Score: 9

3:00pm Thu 5 Jun 14

GBTYZ says...

Yorkie41 wrote:
GBTYZ wrote:
Yorkie41 wrote: Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.
and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear
GBTYZ perhaps there is no such thing on the railways now, but for your information there used to be a coach on the back of every every train that was half coach half van for the carrying off goods and services, even Royal mail used them.
Correct but not anymore and that was the point I was making
[quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GBTYZ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: Why can't the train company's provide a van on the rear of certain trains, seems a sensible idea to me.[/p][/quote]and where do they get the vans and how do they connect them to the train if you dont know what you are talking about the shut up (engage brain before putting mouth into gear[/p][/quote]GBTYZ perhaps there is no such thing on the railways now, but for your information there used to be a coach on the back of every every train that was half coach half van for the carrying off goods and services, even Royal mail used them.[/p][/quote]Correct but not anymore and that was the point I was making GBTYZ
  • Score: 4

3:38pm Thu 5 Jun 14

nottoooldtocare says...

Sigh!
For most of us it shouldn't make any difference if we can put bikes on trains or not, so why get worked up? For those supposedly coming from outside the York area, why would they want to come into the middle of York anyway, last time they were here they got fined for crossing the Ouse, oh and they won't see a race of any sorts either.

On a good note, there should be loads of space in hotel car parks to secure bikes as few of them are full apparently, another indicator of either over price or too much hype. Either way it suggest that it isn't as popular as we might be led to believe. Interesting that a lady (linked to tourism) was on Radio York this morning (dreadful as it is), saying there was no evidence of prices being overly inflated, bull, most of them are set far too high in the first place! Thus in my humble opinion, they deserve every vacancy they carry. The only light on the horizon being the sooner it is here, then the sooner it is over and we can get back to normality. Grrrr.
Sigh! For most of us it shouldn't make any difference if we can put bikes on trains or not, so why get worked up? For those supposedly coming from outside the York area, why would they want to come into the middle of York anyway, last time they were here they got fined for crossing the Ouse, oh and they won't see a race of any sorts either. On a good note, there should be loads of space in hotel car parks to secure bikes as few of them are full apparently, another indicator of either over price or too much hype. Either way it suggest that it isn't as popular as we might be led to believe. Interesting that a lady (linked to tourism) was on Radio York this morning (dreadful as it is), saying there was no evidence of prices being overly inflated, bull, most of them are set far too high in the first place! Thus in my humble opinion, they deserve every vacancy they carry. The only light on the horizon being the sooner it is here, then the sooner it is over and we can get back to normality. Grrrr. nottoooldtocare
  • Score: 9

5:17pm Thu 5 Jun 14

tobefair says...

I agree with you nottooldtocare. This cycle road racing is a peculiarly Continental thing and of not much interest to us Brits. You don't hear the blokes in the pub discussing the latest mountain stage or time trial like you do with football so I don't blame the rail companies for not providing additional cycle space.
I think the French know how much it costs to stage the Grande Departe and are pleased to farm it out every year to anybody that will have it.
I agree with you nottooldtocare. This cycle road racing is a peculiarly Continental thing and of not much interest to us Brits. You don't hear the blokes in the pub discussing the latest mountain stage or time trial like you do with football so I don't blame the rail companies for not providing additional cycle space. I think the French know how much it costs to stage the Grande Departe and are pleased to farm it out every year to anybody that will have it. tobefair
  • Score: 8

5:25pm Thu 5 Jun 14

harrygilmore says...

at least eurostar have a sensible bike and pricing policy
at least eurostar have a sensible bike and pricing policy harrygilmore
  • Score: -5

7:19pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Johnboy1946 says...

As I have said before, the name of this race id Tour de France. France being the operative word. Why have York had to pay so much for this to be here. After all no-one can ride a bike across the Channel, it should stay in France and let the French pay for it.
As I have said before, the name of this race id Tour de France. France being the operative word. Why have York had to pay so much for this to be here. After all no-one can ride a bike across the Channel, it should stay in France and let the French pay for it. Johnboy1946
  • Score: -14

8:49pm Thu 5 Jun 14

pedalling paul says...

Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time.

As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas.
Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.
Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time. As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas. Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point. pedalling paul
  • Score: 32

9:20pm Thu 5 Jun 14

DEKKA says...

mitch2nd wrote:
yarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn

borrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrring

who give a 'S' lets get it over with even Harrogate does not want this and most of York dont either,
A mind reader are you?
[quote][p][bold]mitch2nd[/bold] wrote: yarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn borrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrring who give a 'S' lets get it over with even Harrogate does not want this and most of York dont either,[/p][/quote]A mind reader are you? DEKKA
  • Score: -3

10:14pm Thu 5 Jun 14

pault42 says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time.

As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas.
Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.
What an interesting post. Poor hard done by cyclists, maybe they could make a van which the cyclist could ride into the back of and then be driven to where they want to be. Oh hang on that'd cause congestion I guess, so maybe you should just stop moaning about everything that doesn't revolve around you and your lycra clad cronies, and let others enjoy their way of life.
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time. As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas. Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.[/p][/quote]What an interesting post. Poor hard done by cyclists, maybe they could make a van which the cyclist could ride into the back of and then be driven to where they want to be. Oh hang on that'd cause congestion I guess, so maybe you should just stop moaning about everything that doesn't revolve around you and your lycra clad cronies, and let others enjoy their way of life. pault42
  • Score: -49

10:15pm Thu 5 Jun 14

pault42 says...

Maybe they could just bike where they want to go.......
Maybe they could just bike where they want to go....... pault42
  • Score: -81

10:33pm Thu 5 Jun 14

pedalling paul says...

pault42 wrote:
Maybe they could just bike where they want to go.......
The alternative would be to out the bikes on a car roof rack or hang them on the back of a camper van.Should I bung the road up for you or not.......
[quote][p][bold]pault42[/bold] wrote: Maybe they could just bike where they want to go.......[/p][/quote]The alternative would be to out the bikes on a car roof rack or hang them on the back of a camper van.Should I bung the road up for you or not....... pedalling paul
  • Score: 69

5:32am Fri 6 Jun 14

Bad magic says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time.

As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas.
Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.
Shut the f up you tedious one note c.
Please feel free to add the letters u,u,k,c,t,n as appropriate.
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time. As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas. Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.[/p][/quote]Shut the f up you tedious one note c. Please feel free to add the letters u,u,k,c,t,n as appropriate. Bad magic
  • Score: -113

5:32am Fri 6 Jun 14

Bad magic says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time.

As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas.
Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.
Shut the f up you tedious one note c.
Please feel free to add the letters u,u,k,c,t,n as appropriate.
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time. As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas. Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.[/p][/quote]Shut the f up you tedious one note c. Please feel free to add the letters u,u,k,c,t,n as appropriate. Bad magic
  • Score: -102

1:29pm Fri 6 Jun 14

pedalling paul says...

Bad magic wrote:
pedalling paul wrote:
Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time.

As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas.
Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.
Shut the f up you tedious one note c.
Please feel free to add the letters u,u,k,c,t,n as appropriate.
You appear to be incapable of considerate and courteous debate. Being abusive does not change the fact that many touring cyclists choose to bike by train between home and. Holiday destination. After all it's the most sustainable long distance travel combination.
[quote][p][bold]Bad magic[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Back in the 1980's when the first Sprinter trains appeared, the Dept. for Transport made British Rail remove the traditional guards van space and get the maximum no. of bums on seats in athe minimum of space. That has influenced the design of all new trains since that time. There are no "cycle vans" that can be added onto the back of trains. The InterCity Express to eventually be introduced can accommodate more bikes but on vertical hangers muchh like the Cross Country "Voyagers". That is unfortunate news for touring cyclists who must remove/replace heavy luggage before boarding/alighting. The ability to store a bike on the trai with both wheels on the ground, and hreavy luggage still attached, did much to reduce excessive station dwell time. As to the debate about whether taking bikes by train is a good thing, I have taken my bike by train to reach many touring areas in the UK and overseas. Cycling to these areas would probably take a week either way, with no time to spend at the destination Touring cyclists can be seen arriving daily by train yat York, bringing their spending power to many local businesses.With direct access to the Sustrans White Rose and Way of the Roses long distance routes, York is an ideal jump off point.[/p][/quote]Shut the f up you tedious one note c. Please feel free to add the letters u,u,k,c,t,n as appropriate.[/p][/quote]You appear to be incapable of considerate and courteous debate. Being abusive does not change the fact that many touring cyclists choose to bike by train between home and. Holiday destination. After all it's the most sustainable long distance travel combination. pedalling paul
  • Score: 73

4:36am Sat 7 Jun 14

Magicman! says...

Most times when I got out riding, I get the train in one direction or the other - that way I can go out much further in a day and don't have to be concerned about having the wind blowing straight at me in either my outbound or return cycle journey. But modern train designers don't seem to have got their head around the fact more and more people combine travel options - ie bike from home to train station, get on train with bike, bike from destination train station to final destination - which is a good way of getting to work quickly if you commute to another city which suffers from peak time congestion... I can get on a Transpennine train at manchester (be it a service to York, or going the other way towards scotland), and despite it stating "only 2 bikes per train", my bike ends up being the first of 4, 5 or even 6 bikes in the space... well, that is unless somebody has decided to use the bike space to put their bags in because they can't be bothered to lift them up onto the rack because they're lazy....
but modern train designers are driven by the practices of a privatised industry, an industry which dictates that more passengers equals more money - so not enough space for bums on seats is disapproved; which is why trains have such inadequate luggage space, and only space for two bikes...

... and don't even get me started on the CrossCountry trains vertical bike storage. There is a luggage rack big enough for the maffia to store a few people that did them a disservice, but it spends most of the time empty whilst people have to struggle right by the entrance door (holding up everybody else trying to board or alight) to hook or unhook their bike in a stupid little broom cupboard. On the class 333 electric trains to Skipton, my bike won't even fit through the partition gap to get to the hook, as the corner is too tight. All vertical bike storage shouts out is "we don't care about you, so we'll give you the least amount of room we can".

East Coast still demands a bike is reserved 24 hours in advance, an outdated system out of the days when all bicycles had one really big wheel at the front and a tiny wheel at the back, and the bloke riding it had a fancy hat and a huge moustache! Most days I don't know what I'll be doing 4 hours in advance, nevermind 24 hours ahead... and what about when things go different to plan? As an example on the Sunday of the last bank holiday weekend, I was going to get the 8.11pm train from Blackpool to Leeds, then the Transpennine from Leeds to York - but the train from Blackpool was only going as far as Burnley with a bus the rest of the way (no bikes on buses... integrated transport supposedly) so I revised my plan to change at Preston and get a Transpennine train which had come from Scotland and was going to Manchester, then get a train to York from there; but the train from Scotland terminated short at Preston, the only train to Manchester being a diverted Virgin service to Birmingham... but you have to reserve a bike in advance on Virgin trains - however their system is with the times so with 12 minutes to go before the train arrived, I was able to reserve my bike at the ticket office, and the bloke there phoned the train to let them know I was boarding at Preston. That's how it should be over here, with bikes being allowed onto East Coast trains after 8pm without a reservation when the ticket office is closed.

For one day of the weekend Transpennine Express will be running a special train hired from Direct Rail Services, a train hauled by a locomotive with unpowered carriages... in an ideal world that particular train would have a brake van in the rake, whereby cycles can be stored. Just a shame modern trains aren't designed to allocate half a carriage for bike space.
Most times when I got out riding, I get the train in one direction or the other - that way I can go out much further in a day and don't have to be concerned about having the wind blowing straight at me in either my outbound or return cycle journey. But modern train designers don't seem to have got their head around the fact more and more people combine travel options - ie bike from home to train station, get on train with bike, bike from destination train station to final destination - which is a good way of getting to work quickly if you commute to another city which suffers from peak time congestion... I can get on a Transpennine train at manchester (be it a service to York, or going the other way towards scotland), and despite it stating "only 2 bikes per train", my bike ends up being the first of 4, 5 or even 6 bikes in the space... well, that is unless somebody has decided to use the bike space to put their bags in because they can't be bothered to lift them up onto the rack because they're lazy.... but modern train designers are driven by the practices of a privatised industry, an industry which dictates that more passengers equals more money - so not enough space for bums on seats is disapproved; which is why trains have such inadequate luggage space, and only space for two bikes... ... and don't even get me started on the CrossCountry trains vertical bike storage. There is a luggage rack big enough for the maffia to store a few people that did them a disservice, but it spends most of the time empty whilst people have to struggle right by the entrance door (holding up everybody else trying to board or alight) to hook or unhook their bike in a stupid little broom cupboard. On the class 333 electric trains to Skipton, my bike won't even fit through the partition gap to get to the hook, as the corner is too tight. All vertical bike storage shouts out is "we don't care about you, so we'll give you the least amount of room we can". East Coast still demands a bike is reserved 24 hours in advance, an outdated system out of the days when all bicycles had one really big wheel at the front and a tiny wheel at the back, and the bloke riding it had a fancy hat and a huge moustache! Most days I don't know what I'll be doing 4 hours in advance, nevermind 24 hours ahead... and what about when things go different to plan? As an example on the Sunday of the last bank holiday weekend, I was going to get the 8.11pm train from Blackpool to Leeds, then the Transpennine from Leeds to York - but the train from Blackpool was only going as far as Burnley with a bus the rest of the way (no bikes on buses... integrated transport supposedly) so I revised my plan to change at Preston and get a Transpennine train which had come from Scotland and was going to Manchester, then get a train to York from there; but the train from Scotland terminated short at Preston, the only train to Manchester being a diverted Virgin service to Birmingham... but you have to reserve a bike in advance on Virgin trains - however their system is with the times so with 12 minutes to go before the train arrived, I was able to reserve my bike at the ticket office, and the bloke there phoned the train to let them know I was boarding at Preston. That's how it should be over here, with bikes being allowed onto East Coast trains after 8pm without a reservation when the ticket office is closed. For one day of the weekend Transpennine Express will be running a special train hired from Direct Rail Services, a train hauled by a locomotive with unpowered carriages... in an ideal world that particular train would have a brake van in the rake, whereby cycles can be stored. Just a shame modern trains aren't designed to allocate half a carriage for bike space. Magicman!
  • Score: 3

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