Evening entertainment pilot scheme plan for Coppergate Centre

Evening entertainment pilot scheme plan for Coppergate Centre

Evening entertainment pilot scheme plan for Coppergate Centre

First published in News
Last updated
York Press: Photograph of the Author by

FAMILY-friendly evening entertainment could come to the city centre this summer in a pilot scheme based at the Coppergate Centre.

Councillors are looking at the centre in their efforts to liven up the early evening economy in York city centre, and extend the “tourist day”.

The project began in June and last week the council’s scrutiny and management committee reviewed a draft report on the night-time economy ready to present the plans to the council’s cabinet for final approval next month.

The committee chairman Cllr John Galvin said: “This is an attempt to bring some improvements to the night time – or early evening – economy from 5pm to 8.30pm.

“We want to see a pilot scheme, based in and around the Coppergate centre, and something family orientated.”

The plans would bring entertainment, as well as shopping, into the city in what has traditionally been a teatime lull between shops closing around 5pm and pubs and bars becoming busy later in the night, he added.

“We feel the Coppergate Centre has a lot to offer families, and we didn’t want to base something entirely on shopping.

It is self-contained, and has a perfect space for entertainment.”

If the plans get the go-ahead from council cabinet, a pilot scheme could be run one night a week with late-opening shops and cafes, street entertainers, buskers and food markets, and could be up and running by the school summer holidays.

“We hope the pilot scheme will grow organically and next year could spread into Parliament Street,” Cllr Galvin added.

Besides the Coppergate pilot, the city could see the reintroduction of “dry discos” for teenagers, open spaces being used for concerts and cultural events, and public buildings being opened up for entertainers and performers to put on events in the early evenings.

Cities such as Prague – where the National Gallery stays open in the evenings for concerts – have been held up as examples for York to follow.

The council is also considering new poster boards to display information about evening events, and could commission a specialist listings publication to give details of upcoming events.

Comments (6)

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12:08pm Wed 23 Apr 14

chunkyyorkie says...

Think the powers that be need to decide what they want York to be on a night.
York has a big reputation attracting the stag/hen nights and weekends crowd. Anyone who ventures into the city centre on an evening or even some weekend afternoons will have experienced some of the unpleasantness that this sort of crowd brings in the way of antisocial behaviour, gang mentality and often a sinister and intimidating atmosphere that often go along with drunk adults. Great for the bars and plenty to keep the doormen and police busy. Indeed the binge drinker culture brings good and bad to the city.
At the same time as all this is going on, is it really sensible to try attracting visitors into the centre in a guise of ‘family friendly’ and bring kids into the environment? Some larger cities do have a good atmosphere and culture/lifestyle that works well even into late evenings in the city centre, York currently is not one of them. They would need to make a strong effort to lose the stag/hen crowd but would they want to? The big cities that do have a decent and vibrant night atmosphere that is family friendly tend to work because the pubs in the suburbs are where the ‘trouble’ stays. York city centre though is riddled with pubs/bars so there lies the difference. Evenings are very different to day times. How many police patrols are around in the day? How many doorman on duty? How many fights or people falling in the rivers? Indeed how many university guardians are planning to be on the streets during the days to help those who have had too much to drink?
To also expect retailers to stay open and have their staff subject to some of the unpleasantness is unfair and in the past has often already proven to cause more harm than good. The council seem desperate to get York open for business at 8am for shoppers with free parking and closing stores at 8pm – clearly they seem very muddled up with their ideas, hopes and ambitions for this particular city….but a dose of reality for the councillors is somewhat unlikely isn’t it.
The visitor experience in York between day and night are completely different.
Think the powers that be need to decide what they want York to be on a night. York has a big reputation attracting the stag/hen nights and weekends crowd. Anyone who ventures into the city centre on an evening or even some weekend afternoons will have experienced some of the unpleasantness that this sort of crowd brings in the way of antisocial behaviour, gang mentality and often a sinister and intimidating atmosphere that often go along with drunk adults. Great for the bars and plenty to keep the doormen and police busy. Indeed the binge drinker culture brings good and bad to the city. At the same time as all this is going on, is it really sensible to try attracting visitors into the centre in a guise of ‘family friendly’ and bring kids into the environment? Some larger cities do have a good atmosphere and culture/lifestyle that works well even into late evenings in the city centre, York currently is not one of them. They would need to make a strong effort to lose the stag/hen crowd but would they want to? The big cities that do have a decent and vibrant night atmosphere that is family friendly tend to work because the pubs in the suburbs are where the ‘trouble’ stays. York city centre though is riddled with pubs/bars so there lies the difference. Evenings are very different to day times. How many police patrols are around in the day? How many doorman on duty? How many fights or people falling in the rivers? Indeed how many university guardians are planning to be on the streets during the days to help those who have had too much to drink? To also expect retailers to stay open and have their staff subject to some of the unpleasantness is unfair and in the past has often already proven to cause more harm than good. The council seem desperate to get York open for business at 8am for shoppers with free parking and closing stores at 8pm – clearly they seem very muddled up with their ideas, hopes and ambitions for this particular city….but a dose of reality for the councillors is somewhat unlikely isn’t it. The visitor experience in York between day and night are completely different. chunkyyorkie
  • Score: 15

12:29pm Wed 23 Apr 14

imassey says...

chunkyyorkie wrote:
Think the powers that be need to decide what they want York to be on a night.
York has a big reputation attracting the stag/hen nights and weekends crowd. Anyone who ventures into the city centre on an evening or even some weekend afternoons will have experienced some of the unpleasantness that this sort of crowd brings in the way of antisocial behaviour, gang mentality and often a sinister and intimidating atmosphere that often go along with drunk adults. Great for the bars and plenty to keep the doormen and police busy. Indeed the binge drinker culture brings good and bad to the city.
At the same time as all this is going on, is it really sensible to try attracting visitors into the centre in a guise of ‘family friendly’ and bring kids into the environment? Some larger cities do have a good atmosphere and culture/lifestyle that works well even into late evenings in the city centre, York currently is not one of them. They would need to make a strong effort to lose the stag/hen crowd but would they want to? The big cities that do have a decent and vibrant night atmosphere that is family friendly tend to work because the pubs in the suburbs are where the ‘trouble’ stays. York city centre though is riddled with pubs/bars so there lies the difference. Evenings are very different to day times. How many police patrols are around in the day? How many doorman on duty? How many fights or people falling in the rivers? Indeed how many university guardians are planning to be on the streets during the days to help those who have had too much to drink?
To also expect retailers to stay open and have their staff subject to some of the unpleasantness is unfair and in the past has often already proven to cause more harm than good. The council seem desperate to get York open for business at 8am for shoppers with free parking and closing stores at 8pm – clearly they seem very muddled up with their ideas, hopes and ambitions for this particular city….but a dose of reality for the councillors is somewhat unlikely isn’t it.
The visitor experience in York between day and night are completely different.
You paint a picture of York on an evening as pretty much a no-go area, which I don't believe is true.

Admittedly, as a family, we don't go into town on an evening very often (in part because of the lack of family-friendly activities). However, we attended the York 800 festival in Parliament Street a couple of years back. My daughter was then ten and we stayed almost to the end, only leaving to catch a bus. Yes there were drinkers about but there wasn't a threatening atmosphere, no fights and no "gangs" prowling their turf. My daughter and I also walk through town after events at the GOH and have never felt threatened. The route we take (or took, now that Haymarket is no longer a Council carpark) goes past the Coppergate Centre and, again, it was hardly brimming with thugs, pickpockets and jackals.

These things can work if they are organised and monitored correctly. Day and night can be different, but the transition between the two could easily be a lot more vibrant than it is now. I welcome the idea and look forward to participating.
[quote][p][bold]chunkyyorkie[/bold] wrote: Think the powers that be need to decide what they want York to be on a night. York has a big reputation attracting the stag/hen nights and weekends crowd. Anyone who ventures into the city centre on an evening or even some weekend afternoons will have experienced some of the unpleasantness that this sort of crowd brings in the way of antisocial behaviour, gang mentality and often a sinister and intimidating atmosphere that often go along with drunk adults. Great for the bars and plenty to keep the doormen and police busy. Indeed the binge drinker culture brings good and bad to the city. At the same time as all this is going on, is it really sensible to try attracting visitors into the centre in a guise of ‘family friendly’ and bring kids into the environment? Some larger cities do have a good atmosphere and culture/lifestyle that works well even into late evenings in the city centre, York currently is not one of them. They would need to make a strong effort to lose the stag/hen crowd but would they want to? The big cities that do have a decent and vibrant night atmosphere that is family friendly tend to work because the pubs in the suburbs are where the ‘trouble’ stays. York city centre though is riddled with pubs/bars so there lies the difference. Evenings are very different to day times. How many police patrols are around in the day? How many doorman on duty? How many fights or people falling in the rivers? Indeed how many university guardians are planning to be on the streets during the days to help those who have had too much to drink? To also expect retailers to stay open and have their staff subject to some of the unpleasantness is unfair and in the past has often already proven to cause more harm than good. The council seem desperate to get York open for business at 8am for shoppers with free parking and closing stores at 8pm – clearly they seem very muddled up with their ideas, hopes and ambitions for this particular city….but a dose of reality for the councillors is somewhat unlikely isn’t it. The visitor experience in York between day and night are completely different.[/p][/quote]You paint a picture of York on an evening as pretty much a no-go area, which I don't believe is true. Admittedly, as a family, we don't go into town on an evening very often (in part because of the lack of family-friendly activities). However, we attended the York 800 festival in Parliament Street a couple of years back. My daughter was then ten and we stayed almost to the end, only leaving to catch a bus. Yes there were drinkers about but there wasn't a threatening atmosphere, no fights and no "gangs" prowling their turf. My daughter and I also walk through town after events at the GOH and have never felt threatened. The route we take (or took, now that Haymarket is no longer a Council carpark) goes past the Coppergate Centre and, again, it was hardly brimming with thugs, pickpockets and jackals. These things can work if they are organised and monitored correctly. Day and night can be different, but the transition between the two could easily be a lot more vibrant than it is now. I welcome the idea and look forward to participating. imassey
  • Score: 9

1:01pm Wed 23 Apr 14

Buzzz Light-year says...

The nearest airport is Leeds Bradford, I don't think there'll be many pilots living in York so it'll just be a waste of time.
Why does the council insist on pandering to minority groups instead of the residents?
The nearest airport is Leeds Bradford, I don't think there'll be many pilots living in York so it'll just be a waste of time. Why does the council insist on pandering to minority groups instead of the residents? Buzzz Light-year
  • Score: 9

1:01pm Wed 23 Apr 14

Jackanory2 says...

imassey wrote:
chunkyyorkie wrote: Think the powers that be need to decide what they want York to be on a night. York has a big reputation attracting the stag/hen nights and weekends crowd. Anyone who ventures into the city centre on an evening or even some weekend afternoons will have experienced some of the unpleasantness that this sort of crowd brings in the way of antisocial behaviour, gang mentality and often a sinister and intimidating atmosphere that often go along with drunk adults. Great for the bars and plenty to keep the doormen and police busy. Indeed the binge drinker culture brings good and bad to the city. At the same time as all this is going on, is it really sensible to try attracting visitors into the centre in a guise of ‘family friendly’ and bring kids into the environment? Some larger cities do have a good atmosphere and culture/lifestyle that works well even into late evenings in the city centre, York currently is not one of them. They would need to make a strong effort to lose the stag/hen crowd but would they want to? The big cities that do have a decent and vibrant night atmosphere that is family friendly tend to work because the pubs in the suburbs are where the ‘trouble’ stays. York city centre though is riddled with pubs/bars so there lies the difference. Evenings are very different to day times. How many police patrols are around in the day? How many doorman on duty? How many fights or people falling in the rivers? Indeed how many university guardians are planning to be on the streets during the days to help those who have had too much to drink? To also expect retailers to stay open and have their staff subject to some of the unpleasantness is unfair and in the past has often already proven to cause more harm than good. The council seem desperate to get York open for business at 8am for shoppers with free parking and closing stores at 8pm – clearly they seem very muddled up with their ideas, hopes and ambitions for this particular city….but a dose of reality for the councillors is somewhat unlikely isn’t it. The visitor experience in York between day and night are completely different.
You paint a picture of York on an evening as pretty much a no-go area, which I don't believe is true. Admittedly, as a family, we don't go into town on an evening very often (in part because of the lack of family-friendly activities). However, we attended the York 800 festival in Parliament Street a couple of years back. My daughter was then ten and we stayed almost to the end, only leaving to catch a bus. Yes there were drinkers about but there wasn't a threatening atmosphere, no fights and no "gangs" prowling their turf. My daughter and I also walk through town after events at the GOH and have never felt threatened. The route we take (or took, now that Haymarket is no longer a Council carpark) goes past the Coppergate Centre and, again, it was hardly brimming with thugs, pickpockets and jackals. These things can work if they are organised and monitored correctly. Day and night can be different, but the transition between the two could easily be a lot more vibrant than it is now. I welcome the idea and look forward to participating.
Exactly imassey, I sometimes wander if these people live in the same city as I do.
[quote][p][bold]imassey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chunkyyorkie[/bold] wrote: Think the powers that be need to decide what they want York to be on a night. York has a big reputation attracting the stag/hen nights and weekends crowd. Anyone who ventures into the city centre on an evening or even some weekend afternoons will have experienced some of the unpleasantness that this sort of crowd brings in the way of antisocial behaviour, gang mentality and often a sinister and intimidating atmosphere that often go along with drunk adults. Great for the bars and plenty to keep the doormen and police busy. Indeed the binge drinker culture brings good and bad to the city. At the same time as all this is going on, is it really sensible to try attracting visitors into the centre in a guise of ‘family friendly’ and bring kids into the environment? Some larger cities do have a good atmosphere and culture/lifestyle that works well even into late evenings in the city centre, York currently is not one of them. They would need to make a strong effort to lose the stag/hen crowd but would they want to? The big cities that do have a decent and vibrant night atmosphere that is family friendly tend to work because the pubs in the suburbs are where the ‘trouble’ stays. York city centre though is riddled with pubs/bars so there lies the difference. Evenings are very different to day times. How many police patrols are around in the day? How many doorman on duty? How many fights or people falling in the rivers? Indeed how many university guardians are planning to be on the streets during the days to help those who have had too much to drink? To also expect retailers to stay open and have their staff subject to some of the unpleasantness is unfair and in the past has often already proven to cause more harm than good. The council seem desperate to get York open for business at 8am for shoppers with free parking and closing stores at 8pm – clearly they seem very muddled up with their ideas, hopes and ambitions for this particular city….but a dose of reality for the councillors is somewhat unlikely isn’t it. The visitor experience in York between day and night are completely different.[/p][/quote]You paint a picture of York on an evening as pretty much a no-go area, which I don't believe is true. Admittedly, as a family, we don't go into town on an evening very often (in part because of the lack of family-friendly activities). However, we attended the York 800 festival in Parliament Street a couple of years back. My daughter was then ten and we stayed almost to the end, only leaving to catch a bus. Yes there were drinkers about but there wasn't a threatening atmosphere, no fights and no "gangs" prowling their turf. My daughter and I also walk through town after events at the GOH and have never felt threatened. The route we take (or took, now that Haymarket is no longer a Council carpark) goes past the Coppergate Centre and, again, it was hardly brimming with thugs, pickpockets and jackals. These things can work if they are organised and monitored correctly. Day and night can be different, but the transition between the two could easily be a lot more vibrant than it is now. I welcome the idea and look forward to participating.[/p][/quote]Exactly imassey, I sometimes wander if these people live in the same city as I do. Jackanory2
  • Score: 7

3:45pm Wed 23 Apr 14

piaggio1 says...

Prague.?????
No we are not.
Well take out the drunken brits .
Prague.????? No we are not. Well take out the drunken brits . piaggio1
  • Score: 0

7:03pm Wed 23 Apr 14

bjb says...

'The plans would bring entertainment, as well as shopping, into the city in what has traditionally been a teatime lull between shops closing around 5pm and pubs and bars becoming busy later in the night, he added.'

Hold on a minute. A tea time lull from 5pm until the pubs become busy later in the night. So what was the point in extending the closure of Coppergate until 7pm all about then if the council see this as a period of lullness.
'The plans would bring entertainment, as well as shopping, into the city in what has traditionally been a teatime lull between shops closing around 5pm and pubs and bars becoming busy later in the night, he added.' Hold on a minute. A tea time lull from 5pm until the pubs become busy later in the night. So what was the point in extending the closure of Coppergate until 7pm all about then if the council see this as a period of lullness. bjb
  • Score: -1

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