York's youth unemployment among lowest in UK

York Press: York's youth unemployment among lowest in UK York's youth unemployment among lowest in UK

YORK has one of the lowest levels youth unemployment in UK cities, figure released today show.

The statistics, which appear in a report released by the Work Foundation, show that unemployment among 16-24 year olds lies at less than 13 percent - less than half that of neighbouring Hull and Grimsby where youth unemployment is more than 25 percent.

The report shows York has low levels of youth unemployment, excluding full time students, and is defying regional and national trends on youth unemployment.

Council leader James Alexander said: “It's great to see this report recognises York is outperforming the nation and the region in terms of combating youth unemployment. This shows the council prioritising jobs and growth and that working hard with private sector partners is paying off and reducing the number of young unemployed people in this city.

"Importantly, these figures show York is a city for young ambitious people to start their career and remain here, rather than looking to move elsewhere, as York’s economy is expected to grow further. As ever, we’re not complacent with this news and will continue to strive for full and fair employment and jobs and growth in the city."

But, the report said, there is a significant variation between low and high skilled young people. While 12 percent of youngsters in York with NVQ Level 3 and above qualifications are unemployed, that level rises to 20 percent among those with NVQ level 2 or below qualifications.

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10:11am Thu 10 Apr 14

Zetkin says...

It says an awful lot about who's paying for the bankers' crisis, when 13% youth unemployment is trumpeted as good news.
It says an awful lot about who's paying for the bankers' crisis, when 13% youth unemployment is trumpeted as good news. Zetkin
  • Score: 1

12:37pm Thu 10 Apr 14

MrsHoney says...

We wouldn't allow my step son to sign on, he lives at home so there's no need for him to be asking for money. Yes it costs us alot but I wouldn't want him signing on just to give us public money. Do people in his position show up in the statistics though, I don't think so. He is now on a zero hours contract. So whilst not unemployed some weeks all he gets is 4 hours of work and rarely more than 9. Not exactly fully emplyed IMO.
We wouldn't allow my step son to sign on, he lives at home so there's no need for him to be asking for money. Yes it costs us alot but I wouldn't want him signing on just to give us public money. Do people in his position show up in the statistics though, I don't think so. He is now on a zero hours contract. So whilst not unemployed some weeks all he gets is 4 hours of work and rarely more than 9. Not exactly fully emplyed IMO. MrsHoney
  • Score: 3

9:19pm Thu 10 Apr 14

greenmonkey says...

MrsHoney wrote:
We wouldn't allow my step son to sign on, he lives at home so there's no need for him to be asking for money. Yes it costs us alot but I wouldn't want him signing on just to give us public money. Do people in his position show up in the statistics though, I don't think so. He is now on a zero hours contract. So whilst not unemployed some weeks all he gets is 4 hours of work and rarely more than 9. Not exactly fully emplyed IMO.
Exactly why figures are so low - hardly any young people under 18 can sign on now anyway and by then they are old enough to get work in a bar, supermarket or restaurant of which we have plenty. Most who are able would prefer to do one of these of their choosing than be hounded into taking a work placement working for benefits in a pound shop. Of course this doesn't mean that they are working in a good job with prospects and the opportunity to progress into a worthwhile career, though that could be a route for some into hotel management if they work at it and find a good employer.
[quote][p][bold]MrsHoney[/bold] wrote: We wouldn't allow my step son to sign on, he lives at home so there's no need for him to be asking for money. Yes it costs us alot but I wouldn't want him signing on just to give us public money. Do people in his position show up in the statistics though, I don't think so. He is now on a zero hours contract. So whilst not unemployed some weeks all he gets is 4 hours of work and rarely more than 9. Not exactly fully emplyed IMO.[/p][/quote]Exactly why figures are so low - hardly any young people under 18 can sign on now anyway and by then they are old enough to get work in a bar, supermarket or restaurant of which we have plenty. Most who are able would prefer to do one of these of their choosing than be hounded into taking a work placement working for benefits in a pound shop. Of course this doesn't mean that they are working in a good job with prospects and the opportunity to progress into a worthwhile career, though that could be a route for some into hotel management if they work at it and find a good employer. greenmonkey
  • Score: 0

3:46pm Fri 11 Apr 14

bloodaxe says...

Zetkin wrote:
It says an awful lot about who's paying for the bankers' crisis, when 13% youth unemployment is trumpeted as good news.
It isn't good news. It's just a better rate than many other places. Well done for blaming the bankers and not the City of York Council.
[quote][p][bold]Zetkin[/bold] wrote: It says an awful lot about who's paying for the bankers' crisis, when 13% youth unemployment is trumpeted as good news.[/p][/quote]It isn't good news. It's just a better rate than many other places. Well done for blaming the bankers and not the City of York Council. bloodaxe
  • Score: 0

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