House prices in York closing in on their pre-crash highpoint

York Press: House prices in York closing in on their pre-crash highpoint House prices in York closing in on their pre-crash highpoint

HOUSE prices in York have surged by 3.8 per cent in the past year, meaning they are now only 5 per cent off their peak in 2007.

Latest data from the Land Registry shows that the average price of a property in York is now £182,929, as the London price boom spreads out across many parts of the country - fuelling concerns about difficulties for young people in owning their own home.

York's average price compares with a figure of £170,495 for North Yorkshire, where prices rose by 2.6 per cent over the past year, and of £129,447 for East Riding of Yorkshire, where they increased by 2.4 per cent over the year.

The gulf between York and the rest of this region is even greater when the city is compared to West Yorkshire, where the average price is £108,096, South Yorkshire, where the average is £101,949 and Middlesbrough, where it is only £75,611.

Nick Talbot, a director of Jackson-Stops & Staff's York office, said the city was experiencing more activity than for several years because of rising confidence. "People are happy to start investing in property again," he said.

He believed the increase was fuelled by the historic city's good communications, transport links and schools, along with a shortage of high quality property in parts of the city, such as Bootham and The Mount.

But he did not think the rises amounted to a house price boom, and he felt the city was a long way from seeing its property bubble bursting.

Ben Pridden, head of residential at Savills' York office, said he believed property prices in some of the city's best locations were now back at their 2007 peak.

"We have just sold a property at an address just off The Mount for exactly the same price as it sold for in 2007," he said.

He thought York's prices were rising faster than elsewhere in Yorkshire partly because of the city's good commuter links by train and car with Leeds, where some of the well-paid jobs were based.

The Homeowners Alliance, a consumer lobby group, said people were becoming increasingly concerned that owning their own home was becoming an impossible dream for young people.

Comments (22)

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12:39pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Stafford_Staff says...

I'm guessing most people have not had wage increases in York of 3.8%. The glee with which rises in House Prices is met with is bizarre. Rises in house prices should be greeted the same way as increases in energy bills or inflation. Houses prices are way out of line of average earning; in York a house costs 5.98 time average earnings. We should be doing all we can to bring them down.
I'm guessing most people have not had wage increases in York of 3.8%. The glee with which rises in House Prices is met with is bizarre. Rises in house prices should be greeted the same way as increases in energy bills or inflation. Houses prices are way out of line of average earning; in York a house costs 5.98 time average earnings. We should be doing all we can to bring them down. Stafford_Staff
  • Score: 21

12:45pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Fat Harry says...

Well said, Stafford_Staff,

I'm fairly sure that rents in York are not 5% lower than they were in 2007, meaning that people who can't afford to pay the inflated price to buy a house have been hit by massive rent increases at the same time that real wages have been falling.

The only people celebrating are the parasitic buy-to-let landlords.
Well said, Stafford_Staff, I'm fairly sure that rents in York are not 5% lower than they were in 2007, meaning that people who can't afford to pay the inflated price to buy a house have been hit by massive rent increases at the same time that real wages have been falling. The only people celebrating are the parasitic buy-to-let landlords. Fat Harry
  • Score: 14

1:44pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Eric Olthwaite says...

‘Fat Harry says...
The only people celebrating are the parasitic buy-to-let landlords.’

I wouls suggest that they are not ‘celebrating’ in the short term.

Landlords (parasitic or not) provide a service to people, it’s not all sweetness and light being a private landlord, yes there are rewards in the long term but there are also financial risks and some unsuitable tenants that put you at risk.

I had exactly the same feelings about landlords before I became one and that is that they provide a service within a market, there are market forces, external pressures that effect everybody whether you are in rented accommodation or own your own property.

If you think that landlords are greedy then think again and grow up as we all have to pay our way to house, feed, clothe, heat, travel ourselves somewhere/somehow.

We live in a capitalist society that has been in place long before I was born. It is not the system that I would choose but that is just the way it is.
Get on board or get left behind and then complain, your choice and it is a ‘choice’!

I would people who choose to only remove from services/monies and are a net drain on society and give nothing in return are ‘parasitic’.
‘Fat Harry says... The only people celebrating are the parasitic buy-to-let landlords.’ I wouls suggest that they are not ‘celebrating’ in the short term. Landlords (parasitic or not) provide a service to people, it’s not all sweetness and light being a private landlord, yes there are rewards in the long term but there are also financial risks and some unsuitable tenants that put you at risk. I had exactly the same feelings about landlords before I became one and that is that they provide a service within a market, there are market forces, external pressures that effect everybody whether you are in rented accommodation or own your own property. If you think that landlords are greedy then think again and grow up as we all have to pay our way to house, feed, clothe, heat, travel ourselves somewhere/somehow. We live in a capitalist society that has been in place long before I was born. It is not the system that I would choose but that is just the way it is. Get on board or get left behind and then complain, your choice and it is a ‘choice’! I would people who choose to only remove from services/monies and are a net drain on society and give nothing in return are ‘parasitic’. Eric Olthwaite
  • Score: -5

1:51pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Some old bloke says...

I grew up in York and regularly return to visit relatives and to watch York City matches but have lived away for many years. I would love to return to live in the city but it's unbelievably depressing seeing how the house prices are rising and it means that realistically it's never going to happen. It must be even more depressing for ordinary working people who live in the city and dream of owning their own house.
I too find it difficult to understand the joy shown when house prices escalate like this. Who exactly will benefit from it (apart from property developers and estate agents that is)?
I grew up in York and regularly return to visit relatives and to watch York City matches but have lived away for many years. I would love to return to live in the city but it's unbelievably depressing seeing how the house prices are rising and it means that realistically it's never going to happen. It must be even more depressing for ordinary working people who live in the city and dream of owning their own house. I too find it difficult to understand the joy shown when house prices escalate like this. Who exactly will benefit from it (apart from property developers and estate agents that is)? Some old bloke
  • Score: 12

1:51pm Tue 8 Apr 14

AGuyFromStrensall says...

Stafford_Staff wrote:
I'm guessing most people have not had wage increases in York of 3.8%. The glee with which rises in House Prices is met with is bizarre. Rises in house prices should be greeted the same way as increases in energy bills or inflation. Houses prices are way out of line of average earning; in York a house costs 5.98 time average earnings. We should be doing all we can to bring them down.
I think the glee is mostly restricted to people who have had houses for 15+ years and have never known the modern stress and saving required to get on to or move up the housing ladder.

Same people who complain that there are no need for new houses (as that would reduce the money they would make on their rocketing investment)
[quote][p][bold]Stafford_Staff[/bold] wrote: I'm guessing most people have not had wage increases in York of 3.8%. The glee with which rises in House Prices is met with is bizarre. Rises in house prices should be greeted the same way as increases in energy bills or inflation. Houses prices are way out of line of average earning; in York a house costs 5.98 time average earnings. We should be doing all we can to bring them down.[/p][/quote]I think the glee is mostly restricted to people who have had houses for 15+ years and have never known the modern stress and saving required to get on to or move up the housing ladder. Same people who complain that there are no need for new houses (as that would reduce the money they would make on their rocketing investment) AGuyFromStrensall
  • Score: 12

2:12pm Tue 8 Apr 14

smudge2 says...

Fat Harry wrote:
Well said, Stafford_Staff,

I'm fairly sure that rents in York are not 5% lower than they were in 2007, meaning that people who can't afford to pay the inflated price to buy a house have been hit by massive rent increases at the same time that real wages have been falling.

The only people celebrating are the parasitic buy-to-let landlords.
And the only people celebrating you Fat Harry are the pie shops.What an idiotic statement you have made.You obviously do not understand the free market system to call landlords parasites.
[quote][p][bold]Fat Harry[/bold] wrote: Well said, Stafford_Staff, I'm fairly sure that rents in York are not 5% lower than they were in 2007, meaning that people who can't afford to pay the inflated price to buy a house have been hit by massive rent increases at the same time that real wages have been falling. The only people celebrating are the parasitic buy-to-let landlords.[/p][/quote]And the only people celebrating you Fat Harry are the pie shops.What an idiotic statement you have made.You obviously do not understand the free market system to call landlords parasites. smudge2
  • Score: -6

2:27pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Fat Harry says...

I understand the free market very well, Smudge2.

It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.
I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us. Fat Harry
  • Score: 0

3:23pm Tue 8 Apr 14

smudge2 says...

Fat Harry wrote:
I understand the free market very well, Smudge2.

It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.
Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????
[quote][p][bold]Fat Harry[/bold] wrote: I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.[/p][/quote]Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ???? smudge2
  • Score: -2

3:50pm Tue 8 Apr 14

bloodaxe says...

Bad as this is, it isn't a York story but a national one. It's bad here but worse in the south east. This is a bubble which will implode, probably when interest rates attain their pre-crash levels. The answer (are you listening Mr Pickles et al ?) is to allow councils to borrow against housing stocks and start building again. After all, the guaranteed income from the housing will soon offset the initial costs. The daftest bit of post war legislation was forcing councils to sell their stocks but not allowing them to build with the proceeds. Under local authorities there was an element of social responsibility which is now lacking. Housing is now an investment, not a social or human need. Part of the problem is the ripple effect of London/south east rocketing prices partly caused by foreign money looking for a safe haven and return. Property is bought with no intention of living in it, simply watching it increase in value. In fact, occupying such property would have the effect of lowering prices because there would be more housing. So the incentive is to buy, hold and sell on at a profit. Many blocks in central London, built or proposed, will never have occupants. This affects the rest of the housing market. We've been here before, remember the tulip ?
Bad as this is, it isn't a York story but a national one. It's bad here but worse in the south east. This is a bubble which will implode, probably when interest rates attain their pre-crash levels. The answer (are you listening Mr Pickles et al ?) is to allow councils to borrow against housing stocks and start building again. After all, the guaranteed income from the housing will soon offset the initial costs. The daftest bit of post war legislation was forcing councils to sell their stocks but not allowing them to build with the proceeds. Under local authorities there was an element of social responsibility which is now lacking. Housing is now an investment, not a social or human need. Part of the problem is the ripple effect of London/south east rocketing prices partly caused by foreign money looking for a safe haven and return. Property is bought with no intention of living in it, simply watching it increase in value. In fact, occupying such property would have the effect of lowering prices because there would be more housing. So the incentive is to buy, hold and sell on at a profit. Many blocks in central London, built or proposed, will never have occupants. This affects the rest of the housing market. We've been here before, remember the tulip ? bloodaxe
  • Score: 7

4:20pm Tue 8 Apr 14

york_chap says...

Like someone else has said above, UK housing is now widely considered as a tradeable commodity rather than a human need - and I do think it's a shame in many respects that the market has been allowed to get into its current state.

It's always been the case that to buy your first home you had to work hard and save hard for a few years first. That's as it should be. However, it's not that simple now for many people, even those with reasonably good jobs. After high rents, bills, groceries, transport and other outgoings, there's not a lot left for saving. You then have to account for the fact that in 3 or 4 years' time when you might have saved enough for a deposit, house prices will have risen another £15k - £20k anyway.

I have friends in London (appreciably a different market to here in York, but the same underlying principle) who have decent jobs but have had to give up on the idea of ever owning a property. Down there, even a tiny 1 bed flat a fair walk from a station is £400k plus, with an increase of about £40k in the last year alone. Rent on a similar place is about £16k per year. So even with two people in quite good jobs you'd still have no chance of buying your own place.

With interest rates so low, I completely understand why property makes an attractive investment, returning 4 - 5% plus capital gains, as opposed to maybe 1% in a savings account. However, I really think there should be a cap on the number of properties any private individual or company can own, set at maybe 4 or 5. That'd still allow people to earn a good living/save for their retirement etc whilst freeing up homes for people desperate to get just one.
Like someone else has said above, UK housing is now widely considered as a tradeable commodity rather than a human need - and I do think it's a shame in many respects that the market has been allowed to get into its current state. It's always been the case that to buy your first home you had to work hard and save hard for a few years first. That's as it should be. However, it's not that simple now for many people, even those with reasonably good jobs. After high rents, bills, groceries, transport and other outgoings, there's not a lot left for saving. You then have to account for the fact that in 3 or 4 years' time when you might have saved enough for a deposit, house prices will have risen another £15k - £20k anyway. I have friends in London (appreciably a different market to here in York, but the same underlying principle) who have decent jobs but have had to give up on the idea of ever owning a property. Down there, even a tiny 1 bed flat a fair walk from a station is £400k plus, with an increase of about £40k in the last year alone. Rent on a similar place is about £16k per year. So even with two people in quite good jobs you'd still have no chance of buying your own place. With interest rates so low, I completely understand why property makes an attractive investment, returning 4 - 5% plus capital gains, as opposed to maybe 1% in a savings account. However, I really think there should be a cap on the number of properties any private individual or company can own, set at maybe 4 or 5. That'd still allow people to earn a good living/save for their retirement etc whilst freeing up homes for people desperate to get just one. york_chap
  • Score: 7

5:28pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Elephant says...

It's happening all over again. Another debt fuelled boom with record low household savings rates and consumption beyond people's means.
It's happening all over again. Another debt fuelled boom with record low household savings rates and consumption beyond people's means. Elephant
  • Score: 4

6:41pm Tue 8 Apr 14

The Junkyard Angel says...

I am mortgage free at 45, lucky me. However what about my son/daughter, they will be priced out of the York market. Selby anyone ???
I am mortgage free at 45, lucky me. However what about my son/daughter, they will be priced out of the York market. Selby anyone ??? The Junkyard Angel
  • Score: 0

7:55pm Tue 8 Apr 14

ouseswimmer says...

A lot of buy to let landlords are currently selling their properties in York. They know that current returns are not good and there is a huge risk when the bubble bursts of losing their capital. York is about to see a lot of development which along with special student housing coming online means there is going to be a glut in properties within a few years. Prices can only go lower from here.
A lot of buy to let landlords are currently selling their properties in York. They know that current returns are not good and there is a huge risk when the bubble bursts of losing their capital. York is about to see a lot of development which along with special student housing coming online means there is going to be a glut in properties within a few years. Prices can only go lower from here. ouseswimmer
  • Score: 0

8:03pm Tue 8 Apr 14

bunties says...

smudge2 wrote:
Fat Harry wrote:
I understand the free market very well, Smudge2.

It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.
Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????
I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.
[quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fat Harry[/bold] wrote: I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.[/p][/quote]Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????[/p][/quote]I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning. bunties
  • Score: -4

9:06pm Tue 8 Apr 14

smudge2 says...

bunties wrote:
smudge2 wrote:
Fat Harry wrote:
I understand the free market very well, Smudge2.

It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.
Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????
I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.
Well said
[quote][p][bold]bunties[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fat Harry[/bold] wrote: I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.[/p][/quote]Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????[/p][/quote]I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.[/p][/quote]Well said smudge2
  • Score: -4

10:16pm Tue 8 Apr 14

nearlyman says...

..............Meanwh
ile, back in cuckoo land !...................
........
..............Meanwh ile, back in cuckoo land !................... ........ nearlyman
  • Score: -1

10:16pm Tue 8 Apr 14

nearlyman says...

..............Meanwh
ile, back in cuckoo land !...................
........
..............Meanwh ile, back in cuckoo land !................... ........ nearlyman
  • Score: 0

9:22am Wed 9 Apr 14

AGuyFromStrensall says...

bunties wrote:
smudge2 wrote:
Fat Harry wrote:
I understand the free market very well, Smudge2.

It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.
Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????
I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.
Wow, what a lovely attitude. So according to you the list of people that should be priced out of the market and at be best on the borderline to own a family home are:
The people who teach your kids
The nurse that looks after you if you were ill
Anyone who provides you any services at all
The person that mends your nice big house
Or indeed anyone (or any couples) on an average wage..

(Unless of course they bought a house 15+ years ago when it took no effort at all in comparison of course...)
[quote][p][bold]bunties[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fat Harry[/bold] wrote: I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.[/p][/quote]Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????[/p][/quote]I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.[/p][/quote]Wow, what a lovely attitude. So according to you the list of people that should be priced out of the market and at be best on the borderline to own a family home are: The people who teach your kids The nurse that looks after you if you were ill Anyone who provides you any services at all The person that mends your nice big house Or indeed anyone (or any couples) on an average wage.. (Unless of course they bought a house 15+ years ago when it took no effort at all in comparison of course...) AGuyFromStrensall
  • Score: 5

9:57am Wed 9 Apr 14

Eric Olthwaite says...

‘AGuyFromStrensall says...
Wow, what a lovely attitude. So according to you the list of people that should be priced out of the market and at be best on the borderline to own a family home are:
The people who teach your kids
The nurse that looks after you if you were ill
Anyone who provides you any services at all
The person that mends your nice big house
Or indeed anyone (or any couples) on an average wage..

(Unless of course they bought a house 15+ years ago when it took no effort at all in comparison of course...)’


To be fair the individual occupations listed above by yourself are some of those that are now excluded by income level rather than a pointed effort to exclude them personally!
Its only markets forces and nothing personal! Economics is bigger than all of us!
Perhaps if people who are just below the level of affording their own home by prior financial prudence had some savings, no debt and actually planned and done something positive for this they may have had a chance.

Just because property is expensive in this city it does not mean that property ownership is bad and private landlords are greedy and evil.
‘AGuyFromStrensall says... Wow, what a lovely attitude. So according to you the list of people that should be priced out of the market and at be best on the borderline to own a family home are: The people who teach your kids The nurse that looks after you if you were ill Anyone who provides you any services at all The person that mends your nice big house Or indeed anyone (or any couples) on an average wage.. (Unless of course they bought a house 15+ years ago when it took no effort at all in comparison of course...)’ To be fair the individual occupations listed above by yourself are some of those that are now excluded by income level rather than a pointed effort to exclude them personally! Its only markets forces and nothing personal! Economics is bigger than all of us! Perhaps if people who are just below the level of affording their own home by prior financial prudence had some savings, no debt and actually planned and done something positive for this they may have had a chance. Just because property is expensive in this city it does not mean that property ownership is bad and private landlords are greedy and evil. Eric Olthwaite
  • Score: -3

11:25am Wed 9 Apr 14

Fabius the Delayer says...

Eric Olthwaite wrote:
‘AGuyFromStrensall says...
Wow, what a lovely attitude. So according to you the list of people that should be priced out of the market and at be best on the borderline to own a family home are:
The people who teach your kids
The nurse that looks after you if you were ill
Anyone who provides you any services at all
The person that mends your nice big house
Or indeed anyone (or any couples) on an average wage..

(Unless of course they bought a house 15+ years ago when it took no effort at all in comparison of course...)’


To be fair the individual occupations listed above by yourself are some of those that are now excluded by income level rather than a pointed effort to exclude them personally!
Its only markets forces and nothing personal! Economics is bigger than all of us!
Perhaps if people who are just below the level of affording their own home by prior financial prudence had some savings, no debt and actually planned and done something positive for this they may have had a chance.

Just because property is expensive in this city it does not mean that property ownership is bad and private landlords are greedy and evil.
Its not that privet buy to rent landlords themselves are personally Evil.. Its the Effect they have on the limited supply of housing for the rest of the buying public. i.e. the overpricing of properties on the open market, higher rents for those who can't get on the ladder, under maintained properties etc, This is the real Evil and something has to be done to stop it
[quote][p][bold]Eric Olthwaite[/bold] wrote: ‘AGuyFromStrensall says... Wow, what a lovely attitude. So according to you the list of people that should be priced out of the market and at be best on the borderline to own a family home are: The people who teach your kids The nurse that looks after you if you were ill Anyone who provides you any services at all The person that mends your nice big house Or indeed anyone (or any couples) on an average wage.. (Unless of course they bought a house 15+ years ago when it took no effort at all in comparison of course...)’ To be fair the individual occupations listed above by yourself are some of those that are now excluded by income level rather than a pointed effort to exclude them personally! Its only markets forces and nothing personal! Economics is bigger than all of us! Perhaps if people who are just below the level of affording their own home by prior financial prudence had some savings, no debt and actually planned and done something positive for this they may have had a chance. Just because property is expensive in this city it does not mean that property ownership is bad and private landlords are greedy and evil.[/p][/quote]Its not that privet buy to rent landlords themselves are personally Evil.. Its the Effect they have on the limited supply of housing for the rest of the buying public. i.e. the overpricing of properties on the open market, higher rents for those who can't get on the ladder, under maintained properties etc, This is the real Evil and something has to be done to stop it Fabius the Delayer
  • Score: 4

12:11pm Wed 9 Apr 14

heworth.28 says...

bunties wrote:
smudge2 wrote:
Fat Harry wrote: I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.
Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????
I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.
"And I'm alright, Jack..."

The point is, as you seem to have completely missed, that at present you can do all of those things and STILL end up priced out of the market regardless.
[quote][p][bold]bunties[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]smudge2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Fat Harry[/bold] wrote: I understand the free market very well, Smudge2. It's the freedom for the well-heeled to screw over the rest of us.[/p][/quote]Some people work hard starting with nothing and take risks and do well in life and some people sit on there hands thinking the world owes them a living and then become green eyed and jealous of others. Are you the one who is born crying,live complaining and then die unfulfilled with life ????[/p][/quote]I own a large town house in Bootham for which I've worked hard, starting at school, then uni and now in a demanding job. So I would suggest all the whingers about house prices in York should have done the same and stop moaning.[/p][/quote]"And I'm alright, Jack..." The point is, as you seem to have completely missed, that at present you can do all of those things and STILL end up priced out of the market regardless. heworth.28
  • Score: 3

2:50pm Wed 9 Apr 14

Eric Olthwaite says...

‘Fabius the Delayer says...
Its not that privet buy to rent landlords themselves are personally Evil.. Its the Effect they have on the limited supply of housing for the rest of the buying public. i.e. the overpricing of properties on the open market, higher rents for those who can't get on the ladder, under maintained properties etc, This is the real Evil and something has to be done to stop it’


Impossible to regulate as its purely supply and demand dictating pricing with condition being a factor.

The general over population of the UK is the root cause and that is not going to reduce is it!
‘Fabius the Delayer says... Its not that privet buy to rent landlords themselves are personally Evil.. Its the Effect they have on the limited supply of housing for the rest of the buying public. i.e. the overpricing of properties on the open market, higher rents for those who can't get on the ladder, under maintained properties etc, This is the real Evil and something has to be done to stop it’ Impossible to regulate as its purely supply and demand dictating pricing with condition being a factor. The general over population of the UK is the root cause and that is not going to reduce is it! Eric Olthwaite
  • Score: 2

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