York slips from 3rd to 5th in commuter cycling league table

York Press: York slips from 3rd to 5th in cycling league table York slips from 3rd to 5th in cycling league table

THE proportion of people cycling to work in York has fallen over the past decade despite initiatives to encourage more on to their bikes.

York remains among the best cities for cyclists, according to new figures, but has slipped from joint-third in the country in 2001 to fifth in 2011 for the proportion of workers cycling.

Figures from the Office of National Statistics Census show that in 2001, 12 per cent of employees in the city were cycling to work but that had fallen to 11.2 per cent by 2011. 

City of York Council stressed that the figures did not account for people under the age of 16, over the age of 74 or those cycling for pleasure, an initiative the council has been keen to push as York prepares to welcome the Tour de France Grand Depart in July.

The council also said newer data on overall cycling rates showed the number of people cycling at least once a week in York rose from 23 per cent to 25 per cent between 2011 and 2012.

Coun Dave Merrett, cabinet member for transport, planning and sustainability said that the council has invested in cycling since 2011 and is hoping that the Grand Depart will encourage even more people to taking up some form of cycling. 

He said: “Since 2011 we have continued to invest in cycling and were awarded £4.6 million from the government which built our successful i-Travel York campaign.

“Through this campaign and the world’s largest annual sporting event – the Tour de France – coming to York in less than 100 days, we’re expecting the amount of people cycling to continue rising and enthusiasm for this sport to be a lasting legacy in York.”

Despite the proportion of people cycling to work decreasing, the actual number of people cycling to work increased by 600 from 2001 to 2011, but the rise in the working population in the city has meant that the percentage of cycling commuters has fallen.

Although Yorkshire and the Humber remains in the top ten regions with the highest percentage of cycle commuters, the number of people cycling to work fell by more  than 2,500 from 63,384 in 2001 to 60,865 in 2011. 

York was an official Cycling City  under a Government-sponsored programme from 2008 to 2011. That programme aimed  to increase overall cycling in the city and to double the number of children cycling to school.

Comments (32)

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4:20pm Thu 27 Mar 14

nowthen says...

Thanks PP , keep up the good work , you're doing a fantastic job !
Thanks PP , keep up the good work , you're doing a fantastic job ! nowthen
  • Score: -37

4:21pm Thu 27 Mar 14

BL2 says...

I blame Pedalling P***...!
Actually - the "investment" has been wasted from what I've seen and the state of the roads certainly puts me off starting cycling again.
I blame Pedalling P***...! Actually - the "investment" has been wasted from what I've seen and the state of the roads certainly puts me off starting cycling again. BL2
  • Score: -24

4:23pm Thu 27 Mar 14

smudge2 says...

Any comment PP or has the cat got your tounge ???????
Any comment PP or has the cat got your tounge ??????? smudge2
  • Score: -26

4:26pm Thu 27 Mar 14

YOUWILLDOASISAY says...

Get the Mark-Down Mongrel to adjust the results at the Office of National Statistics.

Better still have whinge about it being a percentage representation that skews the reality, Oh, you already did.
Get the Mark-Down Mongrel to adjust the results at the Office of National Statistics. Better still have whinge about it being a percentage representation that skews the reality, Oh, you already did. YOUWILLDOASISAY
  • Score: -16

4:36pm Thu 27 Mar 14

MouseHouse says...

the actual number of people cycling to work increased...
the actual number of people cycling to work increased... MouseHouse
  • Score: -20

4:38pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Woody G Mellor says...

AND WHAT ABOUT LETTING EVERYONE KNOW THAT BISHOPTHORPE ROAD (SHOP AREA) WAS GOING TO BE CLOSED TODAY???!!!!!

**** USELESS ******!!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRR!!!!
AND WHAT ABOUT LETTING EVERYONE KNOW THAT BISHOPTHORPE ROAD (SHOP AREA) WAS GOING TO BE CLOSED TODAY???!!!!! **** USELESS ******!!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRR!!!! Woody G Mellor
  • Score: -25

4:46pm Thu 27 Mar 14

yorkandproud says...

More people are running to work , to train for the York marathon. Don't worry York folk are as fit as butcher's dogs. On your bike, with your statistics.
More people are running to work , to train for the York marathon. Don't worry York folk are as fit as butcher's dogs. On your bike, with your statistics. yorkandproud
  • Score: -11

4:47pm Thu 27 Mar 14

ICan'tThinkOfAGoodName says...

Fifth's not such a bad position. Still in the play-offs then. We'll hammer the Isles of Scilly and Hackney (third and fourth)
Fifth's not such a bad position. Still in the play-offs then. We'll hammer the Isles of Scilly and Hackney (third and fourth) ICan'tThinkOfAGoodName
  • Score: 10

5:06pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Garrowby Turnoff says...

New Park and Ride has affected the number of cyclists.
New Park and Ride has affected the number of cyclists. Garrowby Turnoff
  • Score: 5

5:12pm Thu 27 Mar 14

MarkyMarkMark says...

Given the apparent hostility regularly expressed on here to towards cyclists, anyone thinking about cycling to work in York might consider it far too dangerous a proposition.

But the truth is that the more people who cycle the safer we all become, and not at all coincidentally the less congestion there is on the roads for the remaining motorists.

York is a good place to cycle. But actually, most places are. York Council do need to get their act in gear though around this whole conflict thing they're contributing towards by apparently favouring cyclists, whereas in reality they've delivered very little over the years, even during the fabled "City of Cycling" years.
Given the apparent hostility regularly expressed on here to towards cyclists, anyone thinking about cycling to work in York might consider it far too dangerous a proposition. But the truth is that the more people who cycle the safer we all become, and not at all coincidentally the less congestion there is on the roads for the remaining motorists. York is a good place to cycle. But actually, most places are. York Council do need to get their act in gear though around this whole conflict thing they're contributing towards by apparently favouring cyclists, whereas in reality they've delivered very little over the years, even during the fabled "City of Cycling" years. MarkyMarkMark
  • Score: 45

5:33pm Thu 27 Mar 14

pedalling paul says...

The underlying reasons for the headline statistic explains a great deal.
Cycle ridership statistics have occasionally plateaued. But hey what if that magic wand was waved over York in the peak, and turned all bikes into single occupancy cars. We'd really know about it then!!

Hopefully in the long term, the measures that York has and is taking, and is planing, will save us from the situation recently experienced in Paris. They banned drivers with odd numbered then even numbered registrations on alternate days.

We may learn soon of yet more Whitehall grants and developer contributions, to encourage cycling and boost infrastructure.
The underlying reasons for the headline statistic explains a great deal. Cycle ridership statistics have occasionally plateaued. But hey what if that magic wand was waved over York in the peak, and turned all bikes into single occupancy cars. We'd really know about it then!! Hopefully in the long term, the measures that York has and is taking, and is planing, will save us from the situation recently experienced in Paris. They banned drivers with odd numbered then even numbered registrations on alternate days. We may learn soon of yet more Whitehall grants and developer contributions, to encourage cycling and boost infrastructure. pedalling paul
  • Score: 53

5:52pm Thu 27 Mar 14

bolero says...

How about banning cycles with an even number of wheels.
How about banning cycles with an even number of wheels. bolero
  • Score: -70

5:56pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Woody G Mellor says...

Woody G Mellor wrote:
AND WHAT ABOUT LETTING EVERYONE KNOW THAT BISHOPTHORPE ROAD (SHOP AREA) WAS GOING TO BE CLOSED TODAY???!!!!!

**** USELESS ******!!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRR!!!!
Sorry for hijacking this article. But I'll bet the Bishy Rd shop owners were very angry too, they were virtually deserted today! No warning, no traffic control, just massive disruption!
[quote][p][bold]Woody G Mellor[/bold] wrote: AND WHAT ABOUT LETTING EVERYONE KNOW THAT BISHOPTHORPE ROAD (SHOP AREA) WAS GOING TO BE CLOSED TODAY???!!!!! **** USELESS ******!!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRR!!!![/p][/quote]Sorry for hijacking this article. But I'll bet the Bishy Rd shop owners were very angry too, they were virtually deserted today! No warning, no traffic control, just massive disruption! Woody G Mellor
  • Score: -80

6:04pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Lamplighter says...

Where do they get these figures from? No one asked me and I cycle to work.
Where do they get these figures from? No one asked me and I cycle to work. Lamplighter
  • Score: 6

6:27pm Thu 27 Mar 14

bjb says...

Woody G Mellor wrote:
Woody G Mellor wrote:
AND WHAT ABOUT LETTING EVERYONE KNOW THAT BISHOPTHORPE ROAD (SHOP AREA) WAS GOING TO BE CLOSED TODAY???!!!!!

**** USELESS ******!!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRR!!!!
Sorry for hijacking this article. But I'll bet the Bishy Rd shop owners were very angry too, they were virtually deserted today! No warning, no traffic control, just massive disruption!
I bet the Bishy Road traders were quick to blame the new Lewis and M&S stores on Monks Cross een when they aren't finished yet.
[quote][p][bold]Woody G Mellor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Woody G Mellor[/bold] wrote: AND WHAT ABOUT LETTING EVERYONE KNOW THAT BISHOPTHORPE ROAD (SHOP AREA) WAS GOING TO BE CLOSED TODAY???!!!!! **** USELESS ******!!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRR!!!![/p][/quote]Sorry for hijacking this article. But I'll bet the Bishy Rd shop owners were very angry too, they were virtually deserted today! No warning, no traffic control, just massive disruption![/p][/quote]I bet the Bishy Road traders were quick to blame the new Lewis and M&S stores on Monks Cross een when they aren't finished yet. bjb
  • Score: -29

6:31pm Thu 27 Mar 14

carpon says...

As well as looking at the infrastructure for the future, looking back when we had more schools, e.g.: within walking distance there was less parents needing to use their cars. The proof of this now on congestion is when the school children are on holiday. I am not fully converted but will be using my cycle more this year as will my family. The car will always be needed but hopefully weather permitting used less for local runs (not school runs). I need my van for work and my car for those occasions when needed. Not going to go into using buses in York.
Not everyone can cycle to work for various reasons, but as much as I disagree with allot of CYC decisions at least now we do have more choice in how we all get around. Re opening the bridge and phasing the traffic lights properly, also turn some of the lights off after peak times will help to ease unnecessary waiting.
Lots can be done in my opinion so all forms of transport can more around instead of all this fighting between the Motor v The Cycle.
As well as looking at the infrastructure for the future, looking back when we had more schools, e.g.: within walking distance there was less parents needing to use their cars. The proof of this now on congestion is when the school children are on holiday. I am not fully converted but will be using my cycle more this year as will my family. The car will always be needed but hopefully weather permitting used less for local runs (not school runs). I need my van for work and my car for those occasions when needed. Not going to go into using buses in York. Not everyone can cycle to work for various reasons, but as much as I disagree with allot of CYC decisions at least now we do have more choice in how we all get around. Re opening the bridge and phasing the traffic lights properly, also turn some of the lights off after peak times will help to ease unnecessary waiting. Lots can be done in my opinion so all forms of transport can more around instead of all this fighting between the Motor v The Cycle. carpon
  • Score: -5

6:49pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Woody G Mellor says...

I see the sad cretin like/dislike manipulator has woken.
I see the sad cretin like/dislike manipulator has woken. Woody G Mellor
  • Score: -62

7:42pm Thu 27 Mar 14

zaccwm says...

When the carriage works, Terry's and Rowntrees were in town almost all seemed to cycle but now almost all seem to be in cars especially as schools seem to be moving further away from where people live. As for work, most people I know have to commute over 30 miles to get to work so cycling is no longer practical.
When the carriage works, Terry's and Rowntrees were in town almost all seemed to cycle but now almost all seem to be in cars especially as schools seem to be moving further away from where people live. As for work, most people I know have to commute over 30 miles to get to work so cycling is no longer practical. zaccwm
  • Score: 17

8:04pm Thu 27 Mar 14

YorkTraveller says...

Why does this report not say which local authorities have now 'overtaken' York in this cycling league table?
(clue - because if they did it would reveal their bias)
Why does this report not say which local authorities have now 'overtaken' York in this cycling league table? (clue - because if they did it would reveal their bias) YorkTraveller
  • Score: 4

8:13pm Thu 27 Mar 14

yorkie76 says...

I ride to work, and a car driver so I am on both sides of the driver/cyclist argument. However, I belive the reason the numbers are dropping are -
1) it is very risky on the roads cycling. At least twice a week I have near misses from drivers not looking or driving far to fast.
2) The roads are in an awful state. Only yesterday I hit a pothole and nearly fell in front of a car.
It will take a serious accident before the council decide to do something.

If they want more people to ride, make it safer. Easily sorted.
I ride to work, and a car driver so I am on both sides of the driver/cyclist argument. However, I belive the reason the numbers are dropping are - 1) it is very risky on the roads cycling. At least twice a week I have near misses from drivers not looking or driving far to fast. 2) The roads are in an awful state. Only yesterday I hit a pothole and nearly fell in front of a car. It will take a serious accident before the council decide to do something. If they want more people to ride, make it safer. Easily sorted. yorkie76
  • Score: 80

9:07pm Thu 27 Mar 14

ZachCohen says...

Well it's simple. They have wasted money on cycle lanes that are not needed and areas where they are needed there are none.
Half the roads are unsafe to cycle on due to pot holes.
Well it's simple. They have wasted money on cycle lanes that are not needed and areas where they are needed there are none. Half the roads are unsafe to cycle on due to pot holes. ZachCohen
  • Score: -58

9:41pm Thu 27 Mar 14

Mrs Yorkie says...

No point in spending money on more cycle lanes as a good majority of cyclists use footpaths instead.

Spend more money on the roads and foopaths; but footpaths for pedestrians only.
No point in spending money on more cycle lanes as a good majority of cyclists use footpaths instead. Spend more money on the roads and foopaths; but footpaths for pedestrians only. Mrs Yorkie
  • Score: -66

3:48am Fri 28 Mar 14

Magicman! says...

MarkyMarkMark wrote:
Given the apparent hostility regularly expressed on here to towards cyclists, anyone thinking about cycling to work in York might consider it far too dangerous a proposition.

But the truth is that the more people who cycle the safer we all become, and not at all coincidentally the less congestion there is on the roads for the remaining motorists.

York is a good place to cycle. But actually, most places are. York Council do need to get their act in gear though around this whole conflict thing they're contributing towards by apparently favouring cyclists, whereas in reality they've delivered very little over the years, even during the fabled "City of Cycling" years.
My thoughts exactly.

In recent years I have noted some of the following:
- non-skid surfaces at junctions and tight corners of off-road cycle routes has worn off - notably the tight hairpin turn from Crichton Avenue bridge onto the cycle route that goes under Wigginton Road has worn off completely, which will (if not already) lead to people skidding and coming off

- poor quality on-road cycle lanes:- Huntington Road (Bellfarm) and York Road Haxby (Eastfield avenue area) both less than half the minimum width required by the DfT, not even covering the width of a bicycle; cycle lanes on other roads have wide potholes and sunken drain covers; the cycle lane on Crichton Avenue is permanently obstructed by inconsiderate parking; the new cycle lanes on Sterling Road at Clifton Moor are below the minimum required width required by the DfT, and in addition the footpath was widened around the roundabout by Screwfix which now leads to a 'Pinch Point' whereby a cyclist turning off the roundabout onto Stirling Road is often cut-up by motorists trying to take the fast line out of the roundabout, thereby making the 'improvement' more dangerous than before; the cycle lane at the junction of Striling Road and Audax Road in Clifton Moor is also dangerous, as the lane itself has been painted in the actual exit from Audax Road and ends right at a traffic island and so leads to motorists cutting up cyclists, rendering the new cycle lane more dangerous than before the cycle lane was put in place; cycle lanes at roundabouts such as Stirling Road and also at Stockton Lane/Heworth Road can put cyclists in completely the wrong position in the road if they are taking the 2nd or 3rd exit and need to travel right around the roundabout; there is a lack of enforcement to prevent vehicles occupying green cycles-only boxes at traffic lights; and of course the priority lane for cycles was removed from Water Lane despite all knoweledgeable persons such as the police and accident investigators advising against removal, removing it against the consultation results which had roughly 70% response stating to leave it as it was (in place), and at a cost of £12,000 to taxpayers to remove; the Minster Plazza was built with non-compliant surfaces with an invisible colour change to partially-sighted people, and very little in the means of physical/ tactile surfaces or edges to denote there is still a priority cycle lane running through the area, and very poor signage to alert people on the square of the cycle route...


- poor quality off-road cycle lanes:- the A1237 cycle path over the river ouse and railway was recently resurfaced with the 'edge of carriageway' white line moved further away from the path by a few inches, yet the opportunity the widen the path by 8-12 inches thereby improving safety for passing others on there was overlooked, so the path is still difficult to pass others on; the cycle lanes beside Malton Road were first built in 1999 and so priority for cyclists over traffic turning to/from minor side roads was delivered without the need for a raised speed hump at the road entrance, with the priority of cyclists over Muncastergate for example being clearly marked with green tarmac - the council come along about 4 months ago and repainted the white lines in the incorrect position and has neglected to observe cyclist priority; cyclists travelling on the road at Field Lane from Heslington Hall heading eastbound have no means of accessing the cycle lane for either Windmill Lane or Riverside Way (Heslington East Campus) without either going through a red light or riding on the wrong side of the road; cyclists using the road from Clifton Moorgate have no means of accessing the off-road cycle lane at Hurricane Way without going through a red traffic light, and there is a lack of cycle priority for the off-road cycle route on Hurricane Way where it crosses a car park entrance; where the Roko Gym was built on Striling Road, this interrupted what had been a seamless off-road cycle route - cycle priority should have been maintained but failed to be done; when Hallfield Road bridge over the off-road cycle route was taken down and replaced with an at-grade road crossing, a speed hump was introduced and so cyclist priority should have been honoured in respect of the removal of the bridge which had previously allowed cyclists to carry on unhindered - again this was not done; cyclists travelling along James Street from Lawrence Street towards Layerthorpe have poor off-road cycle lane provision due to poor signage and inadequate crossing points, and at the Morrisons junction if a cyclist is using the off-road route they have to cross the minor road in 2 seperate stages and use a very narrow traffic island as compared to just one seamless crossing if a cyclist has opted to use the road; the off-road shared cycle lane on Clifton Moorgate from Kettlestring Lane to Hurricane Way (west side of Clifton Moorgate) has a very poor surface quality, being buckled and broken, and is hard to use due to overhanging plant growth, in addition to poor signage and inadequate width; the off-road cycle lane on the North Side of Water End is clearly marked on the surface as 'CYCLES ONLY', yet there is no pole-mounted sign stating 'pedestrians forbidden' to back this up, and nothing is being done to physically prevent pedestrians illegally using this traffic lane; there is a cycle lane from Huntington New Lane to the Waterworld site on Katryn Avenue and yet the cycle lane suddenly dissappears with it not restarting until after the junction with Jockey Lane, which leads to confusion as to where cyclists can and cannot go, and whether they need to wait at the red light or go across onto the pavement where the off-road cycle lane restarts; There is currently no safe way to cross the dual carriageway Jockey Lane at Monks Cross due to a contractor deciding to remove one crossing point and then not bothering to finish off the 'new' crossing point; The riverside cycle route that uses Dame Judi Dench walk has recently been signed for cycles to instead get from Rawcliffe into York by dismounting the bicycle and crossing Scarborough rail bridge using the narrow bridge deck and steep stairs which are slippy in wet and wintery weather, whilst the remaining cycle route there has been resigned to the lower level of paving which gets flooded and spend most of the year covered in leaves or grime whilst the surface level itself is bumpy and uneven; there is no off-road route to go to Strensall, no off-road route for cyclists from Strensall/ Earswick/ Huntington to get to the city centre along the Foss corridor, no off-road route from Crichton Avenue to the river ouse (going behind the hospital, bootham park, and under Bootham itself before getting to Scarborough rail bridge at the level of the bridge deck), and no off-road route along the full length of Wigginton Road from Nestle to Wigginton Mill Lane....

... and that is just what I have thought of in the 10 minutes I have been writing this comment!!!

WHERE is the investment in actual proper cycling facilities that are of any use to everyday people? Why do most of York's traffic lights either fail to detect bikes or send the lights to red as soon as a bike approaches? Even bicycle parking provision is becoming worse, led by Ron Cooke's OCD obsession to remove all traces of "street clutter", the railings of Parliament Strete being one example, and in the council's plan they intend to remove all cycle parking within the pedestrianised area of York because apparently people who work in buisnesses in that area don't need to have somewhere to park their bike for the 8 hours whilst they're working!!
[quote][p][bold]MarkyMarkMark[/bold] wrote: Given the apparent hostility regularly expressed on here to towards cyclists, anyone thinking about cycling to work in York might consider it far too dangerous a proposition. But the truth is that the more people who cycle the safer we all become, and not at all coincidentally the less congestion there is on the roads for the remaining motorists. York is a good place to cycle. But actually, most places are. York Council do need to get their act in gear though around this whole conflict thing they're contributing towards by apparently favouring cyclists, whereas in reality they've delivered very little over the years, even during the fabled "City of Cycling" years.[/p][/quote]My thoughts exactly. In recent years I have noted some of the following: - non-skid surfaces at junctions and tight corners of off-road cycle routes has worn off - notably the tight hairpin turn from Crichton Avenue bridge onto the cycle route that goes under Wigginton Road has worn off completely, which will (if not already) lead to people skidding and coming off - poor quality on-road cycle lanes:- Huntington Road (Bellfarm) and York Road Haxby (Eastfield avenue area) both less than half the minimum width required by the DfT, not even covering the width of a bicycle; cycle lanes on other roads have wide potholes and sunken drain covers; the cycle lane on Crichton Avenue is permanently obstructed by inconsiderate parking; the new cycle lanes on Sterling Road at Clifton Moor are below the minimum required width required by the DfT, and in addition the footpath was widened around the roundabout by Screwfix which now leads to a 'Pinch Point' whereby a cyclist turning off the roundabout onto Stirling Road is often cut-up by motorists trying to take the fast line out of the roundabout, thereby making the 'improvement' more dangerous than before; the cycle lane at the junction of Striling Road and Audax Road in Clifton Moor is also dangerous, as the lane itself has been painted in the actual exit from Audax Road and ends right at a traffic island and so leads to motorists cutting up cyclists, rendering the new cycle lane more dangerous than before the cycle lane was put in place; cycle lanes at roundabouts such as Stirling Road and also at Stockton Lane/Heworth Road can put cyclists in completely the wrong position in the road if they are taking the 2nd or 3rd exit and need to travel right around the roundabout; there is a lack of enforcement to prevent vehicles occupying green cycles-only boxes at traffic lights; and of course the priority lane for cycles was removed from Water Lane despite all knoweledgeable persons such as the police and accident investigators advising against removal, removing it against the consultation results which had roughly 70% response stating to leave it as it was (in place), and at a cost of £12,000 to taxpayers to remove; the Minster Plazza was built with non-compliant surfaces with an invisible colour change to partially-sighted people, and very little in the means of physical/ tactile surfaces or edges to denote there is still a priority cycle lane running through the area, and very poor signage to alert people on the square of the cycle route... - poor quality off-road cycle lanes:- the A1237 cycle path over the river ouse and railway was recently resurfaced with the 'edge of carriageway' white line moved further away from the path by a few inches, yet the opportunity the widen the path by 8-12 inches thereby improving safety for passing others on there was overlooked, so the path is still difficult to pass others on; the cycle lanes beside Malton Road were first built in 1999 and so priority for cyclists over traffic turning to/from minor side roads was delivered without the need for a raised speed hump at the road entrance, with the priority of cyclists over Muncastergate for example being clearly marked with green tarmac - the council come along about 4 months ago and repainted the white lines in the incorrect position and has neglected to observe cyclist priority; cyclists travelling on the road at Field Lane from Heslington Hall heading eastbound have no means of accessing the cycle lane for either Windmill Lane or Riverside Way (Heslington East Campus) without either going through a red light or riding on the wrong side of the road; cyclists using the road from Clifton Moorgate have no means of accessing the off-road cycle lane at Hurricane Way without going through a red traffic light, and there is a lack of cycle priority for the off-road cycle route on Hurricane Way where it crosses a car park entrance; where the Roko Gym was built on Striling Road, this interrupted what had been a seamless off-road cycle route - cycle priority should have been maintained but failed to be done; when Hallfield Road bridge over the off-road cycle route was taken down and replaced with an at-grade road crossing, a speed hump was introduced and so cyclist priority should have been honoured in respect of the removal of the bridge which had previously allowed cyclists to carry on unhindered - again this was not done; cyclists travelling along James Street from Lawrence Street towards Layerthorpe have poor off-road cycle lane provision due to poor signage and inadequate crossing points, and at the Morrisons junction if a cyclist is using the off-road route they have to cross the minor road in 2 seperate stages and use a very narrow traffic island as compared to just one seamless crossing if a cyclist has opted to use the road; the off-road shared cycle lane on Clifton Moorgate from Kettlestring Lane to Hurricane Way (west side of Clifton Moorgate) has a very poor surface quality, being buckled and broken, and is hard to use due to overhanging plant growth, in addition to poor signage and inadequate width; the off-road cycle lane on the North Side of Water End is clearly marked on the surface as 'CYCLES ONLY', yet there is no pole-mounted sign stating 'pedestrians forbidden' to back this up, and nothing is being done to physically prevent pedestrians illegally using this traffic lane; there is a cycle lane from Huntington New Lane to the Waterworld site on Katryn Avenue and yet the cycle lane suddenly dissappears with it not restarting until after the junction with Jockey Lane, which leads to confusion as to where cyclists can and cannot go, and whether they need to wait at the red light or go across onto the pavement where the off-road cycle lane restarts; There is currently no safe way to cross the dual carriageway Jockey Lane at Monks Cross due to a contractor deciding to remove one crossing point and then not bothering to finish off the 'new' crossing point; The riverside cycle route that uses Dame Judi Dench walk has recently been signed for cycles to instead get from Rawcliffe into York by dismounting the bicycle and crossing Scarborough rail bridge using the narrow bridge deck and steep stairs which are slippy in wet and wintery weather, whilst the remaining cycle route there has been resigned to the lower level of paving which gets flooded and spend most of the year covered in leaves or grime whilst the surface level itself is bumpy and uneven; there is no off-road route to go to Strensall, no off-road route for cyclists from Strensall/ Earswick/ Huntington to get to the city centre along the Foss corridor, no off-road route from Crichton Avenue to the river ouse (going behind the hospital, bootham park, and under Bootham itself before getting to Scarborough rail bridge at the level of the bridge deck), and no off-road route along the full length of Wigginton Road from Nestle to Wigginton Mill Lane.... ... and that is just what I have thought of in the 10 minutes I have been writing this comment!!! WHERE is the investment in actual proper cycling facilities that are of any use to everyday people? Why do most of York's traffic lights either fail to detect bikes or send the lights to red as soon as a bike approaches? Even bicycle parking provision is becoming worse, led by Ron Cooke's OCD obsession to remove all traces of "street clutter", the railings of Parliament Strete being one example, and in the council's plan they intend to remove all cycle parking within the pedestrianised area of York because apparently people who work in buisnesses in that area don't need to have somewhere to park their bike for the 8 hours whilst they're working!! Magicman!
  • Score: -4

6:42am Fri 28 Mar 14

Igiveinthen says...

pedalling paul wrote:
The underlying reasons for the headline statistic explains a great deal.
Cycle ridership statistics have occasionally plateaued. But hey what if that magic wand was waved over York in the peak, and turned all bikes into single occupancy cars. We'd really know about it then!!

Hopefully in the long term, the measures that York has and is taking, and is planing, will save us from the situation recently experienced in Paris. They banned drivers with odd numbered then even numbered registrations on alternate days.

We may learn soon of yet more Whitehall grants and developer contributions, to encourage cycling and boost infrastructure.
They did the same in Athens pp years ago, odd and even numbered cars could access the city on alternate days, but you forgot to mention that unusuall atmospherics played a big part too.
PS when you come to sell your car can you let me know, after all it will be a good buy as it will be a very low mileage example!
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: The underlying reasons for the headline statistic explains a great deal. Cycle ridership statistics have occasionally plateaued. But hey what if that magic wand was waved over York in the peak, and turned all bikes into single occupancy cars. We'd really know about it then!! Hopefully in the long term, the measures that York has and is taking, and is planing, will save us from the situation recently experienced in Paris. They banned drivers with odd numbered then even numbered registrations on alternate days. We may learn soon of yet more Whitehall grants and developer contributions, to encourage cycling and boost infrastructure.[/p][/quote]They did the same in Athens pp years ago, odd and even numbered cars could access the city on alternate days, but you forgot to mention that unusuall atmospherics played a big part too. PS when you come to sell your car can you let me know, after all it will be a good buy as it will be a very low mileage example! Igiveinthen
  • Score: -26

7:15am Fri 28 Mar 14

mortandindi says...

Slipping down the league, great lets look forward to relegation and get
rid of them.
Slipping down the league, great lets look forward to relegation and get rid of them. mortandindi
  • Score: -63

9:10am Fri 28 Mar 14

dc1926 says...

What a load of old potholes!
What a load of old potholes! dc1926
  • Score: -1

11:19am Fri 28 Mar 14

meme says...

I like cycling and am as keen on next man to cycle to work on my fancy bike but the state of the roads is frankly dreadful for a bike even on the cycle paths and buckles wheels. At least my car can cope with the potholes.
even along the river bank the cycle way is terrible as tree roots have turned the surface into a lumpy mess!
I would be keener if the route was well surfaced
Us cyclists don't need huge wide areas like the cycle motorway, stupid route, along outer ring road we need a strip of level surface a foot or so wide which could be created on virtually any verge and give us safe routes all over York and get us off roads
I like cycling and am as keen on next man to cycle to work on my fancy bike [I also drive] but the state of the roads is frankly dreadful for a bike even on the cycle paths and buckles wheels. At least my car can cope with the potholes. even along the river bank the cycle way is terrible as tree roots have turned the surface into a lumpy mess! I would be keener if the route was well surfaced Us cyclists don't need huge wide areas like the cycle motorway, stupid route, along outer ring road [which I have never seen anyone on] we need a strip of level surface a foot or so wide which could be created on virtually any verge and give us safe routes all over York and get us off roads meme
  • Score: 2

1:11pm Fri 28 Mar 14

MarkyMarkMark says...

Mrs Yorkie wrote:
No point in spending money on more cycle lanes as a good majority of cyclists use footpaths instead.

Spend more money on the roads and foopaths; but footpaths for pedestrians only.
No Mrs Yorkie, a "good majority" do NOT use footpaths instead.

A *small* percentage (who I would classify as a "bad minority") out of the large group of cyclists in York do. But they're the same inconsiderate twits who will be a hazard to pedestrians, cyclists and motorists alike, regardless of their mode of transport.

A twerp is a twerp, whether they're on a bike or not.
[quote][p][bold]Mrs Yorkie[/bold] wrote: No point in spending money on more cycle lanes as a good majority of cyclists use footpaths instead. Spend more money on the roads and foopaths; but footpaths for pedestrians only.[/p][/quote]No Mrs Yorkie, a "good majority" do NOT use footpaths instead. A *small* percentage (who I would classify as a "bad minority") out of the large group of cyclists in York do. But they're the same inconsiderate twits who will be a hazard to pedestrians, cyclists and motorists alike, regardless of their mode of transport. A twerp is a twerp, whether they're on a bike or not. MarkyMarkMark
  • Score: 10

3:37pm Fri 28 Mar 14

bringbackcommonsense says...

Personally I cannot see the point in wasting money on more cycle lanes; the ones we have are rarely used. The cyclists just ride in the, often, narrower roads.

A19 down to Rawcliffe is a prime example. It is quite narrow near the Mercure Hotel and this is made worse by the concrete central islands yet there is a perfectly usable cycle lane running alongside the road. Saw a small group of peddling lemmings trying to negotiate the roundabout in York which is completely avoided if they had been on the expensive cycle lane. They then wonder why motorists are unsympathetic. I despair at times.
Personally I cannot see the point in wasting money on more cycle lanes; the ones we have are rarely used. The cyclists just ride in the, often, narrower roads. A19 down to Rawcliffe is a prime example. It is quite narrow near the Mercure Hotel and this is made worse by the concrete central islands yet there is a perfectly usable cycle lane running alongside the road. Saw a small group of peddling lemmings trying to negotiate the roundabout in York which is completely avoided if they had been on the expensive cycle lane. They then wonder why motorists are unsympathetic. I despair at times. bringbackcommonsense
  • Score: 3

4:04pm Fri 28 Mar 14

daveyboy25 says...

Cyclists need to pass a simple test, as many dont even know the basics
Cyclists need to pass a simple test, as many dont even know the basics daveyboy25
  • Score: 0

4:17am Sat 29 Mar 14

Magicman! says...

bringbackcommonsense wrote:
Personally I cannot see the point in wasting money on more cycle lanes; the ones we have are rarely used. The cyclists just ride in the, often, narrower roads.

A19 down to Rawcliffe is a prime example. It is quite narrow near the Mercure Hotel and this is made worse by the concrete central islands yet there is a perfectly usable cycle lane running alongside the road. Saw a small group of peddling lemmings trying to negotiate the roundabout in York which is completely avoided if they had been on the expensive cycle lane. They then wonder why motorists are unsympathetic. I despair at times.
"Perfectly useable cycle lane"???
Are you referring to the one from Skelton to the A1237 roundabout? If so then I challenge you to ride that route at 20mph on a bicycle without any form of suspension and with narrow road tyres. If you acomplish the challenge and can realistically say the cycle path there is of a good standard and offers no risk to cyclists using it at normal road speeds, then I will buy you a beer.
[quote][p][bold]bringbackcommonsense[/bold] wrote: Personally I cannot see the point in wasting money on more cycle lanes; the ones we have are rarely used. The cyclists just ride in the, often, narrower roads. A19 down to Rawcliffe is a prime example. It is quite narrow near the Mercure Hotel and this is made worse by the concrete central islands yet there is a perfectly usable cycle lane running alongside the road. Saw a small group of peddling lemmings trying to negotiate the roundabout in York which is completely avoided if they had been on the expensive cycle lane. They then wonder why motorists are unsympathetic. I despair at times.[/p][/quote]"Perfectly useable cycle lane"??? Are you referring to the one from Skelton to the A1237 roundabout? If so then I challenge you to ride that route at 20mph on a bicycle without any form of suspension and with narrow road tyres. If you acomplish the challenge and can realistically say the cycle path there is of a good standard and offers no risk to cyclists using it at normal road speeds, then I will buy you a beer. Magicman!
  • Score: 1

9:28am Sat 29 Mar 14

Sillybillies says...

Now remove all the road narrowing cycle lanes and let the car traffic flow properly.
Now remove all the road narrowing cycle lanes and let the car traffic flow properly. Sillybillies
  • Score: 0

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