Chance to see stars at University of York’s Astrocampus

Chance to see stars at university's new Astrocampus

Astronomer Dr Emily Brunsden, centre, demonstrates the ten-inch Meade telescope to Archbishop Holgate School students Katie Melsom, aged 11, and Dominic Salte, aged 12, who were taking part in activities on the Astrocampus

The Outreach Officer from the University of York's Department of Physics Katherine Leech with the planet Jupiter in the Cosmodome which is part of the Astrocampus.

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THE mysteries of space will be brought closer to home with events at the University of York’s Astrocampus.

Created by the Department of Physics, the Astrocampus provides a unique venue for people of all ages to study the universe.

After the official opening last night, a star-filled programme of school activities and public observing evenings is due to begin in earnest with the appointment of a new outreach officer.

Yesterday’s official launch saw about 400 local children take part in workshops such as rocket-making, go on a virtual journey through the universe in an inflatable planetarium called a cosmodome, and find out how the Sun works, in a sundome.

Later on in the evening, a space exhibition gave people the chance to take a tour of the facility and attend a lecture by Dr Andrew Pontzen, a Royal Society University Research Fellow at University College London, who asked: ‘Does dark matter really exist?’ Katherine Leech, outreach officer from the Department of Physics, said: “We are really excited to be able to share the awe and wonder of space with local people of all ages, and have organised a fun-filled day and evening of hands-on activities for everyone to enjoy.”

The Astrocampus houses the Meade 14-inch, ten-inch and eight-inch telescopes in its two purpose-built observatories, as well as a solar telescope for observing the Sun safely, and radio telescopes for looking into the skies by day or night.

Any community group or school interested in arranging a special visit to the York Astrocampus can contact Katherine Leech on 01904 322 209 or via email astrocampus@york.ac.uk

Monthly observing evenings will run from the end of March to September.

Weekly observing evenings will start in October and continue over the winter months. Visit www.yorkastronight.eventbrite.co.uk to book a free place.

Comments (9)

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9:44am Tue 18 Mar 14

Blimp says...

Brilliant, love it! More please.
Brilliant, love it! More please. Blimp
  • Score: 1

9:57am Tue 18 Mar 14

pedalling paul says...

I enjoy looking at heavenly bodies......!
I enjoy looking at heavenly bodies......! pedalling paul
  • Score: 0

11:11am Tue 18 Mar 14

Garrowby Turnoff says...

Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.
Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems. Garrowby Turnoff
  • Score: 4

2:33pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

Garrowby Turnoff wrote:
Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.
Good heavens. I think you're making a spectacle of yourself.
[quote][p][bold]Garrowby Turnoff[/bold] wrote: Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.[/p][/quote]Good heavens. I think you're making a spectacle of yourself. Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 3

3:17pm Tue 18 Mar 14

sheps lad says...

Garrowby Turnoff wrote:
Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.
Google it?
[quote][p][bold]Garrowby Turnoff[/bold] wrote: Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.[/p][/quote]Google it? sheps lad
  • Score: -1

3:24pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Garrowby Turnoff says...

sheps lad wrote:
Garrowby Turnoff wrote:
Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.
Google it?
'course.
[quote][p][bold]sheps lad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Garrowby Turnoff[/bold] wrote: Meade 14-inch? I wonder if it has coma-free pinpoint star images and a flatter field which reduces the astigmatism and eliminates diffractions spikes found in classical Ritchey-Chrétien optical systems.[/p][/quote]Google it?[/p][/quote]'course. Garrowby Turnoff
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

Astrocampus? I once went to something about the hippocampus but i couldn't get my brain around it.
Astrocampus? I once went to something about the hippocampus but i couldn't get my brain around it. Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 1

6:06pm Tue 18 Mar 14

PKH says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
Astrocampus? I once went to something about the hippocampus but i couldn't get my brain around it.
I wondered whether they had astro-turfed the campus.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: Astrocampus? I once went to something about the hippocampus but i couldn't get my brain around it.[/p][/quote]I wondered whether they had astro-turfed the campus. PKH
  • Score: 0

10:17pm Tue 18 Mar 14

ColdAsChristmas says...

That 10 incher in the picture is a reflector, so the image will be upside down and will be deviod of colour. On the other hand, these telescopes produce some nice sharp images. Just so you know.
That 10 incher in the picture is a reflector, so the image will be upside down and will be deviod of colour. On the other hand, these telescopes produce some nice sharp images. Just so you know. ColdAsChristmas
  • Score: 0

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