Wheelie bins left uncollected in Farrar Street, York after cars block access for bin lorries

OBSTACLES: Farrar Street, where bins have not been emptied because refuse trucks cannot get down the street

OBSTACLES: Farrar Street, where bins have not been emptied because refuse trucks cannot get down the street

Updated in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

SCORES of wheelie bins have been repeatedly left unemptied in a York street after parked cars blocked access for council bin lorries.

Resident Richard Bowen said the bins in Farrar Street, off Lawrence Street, had been left uncollected for several days on three occasions so far this year.

"There has been no attempt by the council to prevent or alleviate the problem or keep residents informed," he claimed.

"It is worth noting we all received a very curt letter last year threatening fines to anyone who put bins out early or left them out late."

Andy Kelly, waste operations manager at City of York Council, said its lorries had been experiencing difficulties in accessing Farrar Street every other Monday due to poorly parked vehicles at the Lawrence Street junction, which had prevented them reversing in.

"Our normal practice is that we try later in the day and if we still cannot get access, try again the following day," he said.

"However, we are not permitted to commence domestic collections until 7am and as Farrar Street is over 160 metres in length it's not possible for us to walk in and collect and return nearly 70 bins, particularly while leaving a large vehicle unattended on a major road junction."

He said the council had only one smaller collection vehicle on the fleet, which could get down the street, but the number of bins was more than the vehicle could carry and would mean at least two trips, taking time when the vehicle had dedicated work to do out in remote rural areas.

He said cars were parked at the top of the road by people working in the city centre and highways was considering extending yellow lines around the junction, but this would require consultation with local residents, as it would reduce the amount of parking available to them. There is also a cost to this exercise and it is not a quick fix. Temporary measures are not an option."

He said that for the time being, the council would continue to attempt collection on the scheduled day or return until collections were carried out.

Comments (51)

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8:07am Mon 17 Mar 14

Lunatic says...

Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.
Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message. Lunatic
  • Score: 43

8:10am Mon 17 Mar 14

bloodaxe says...

Ah yes, fines. Aren't we all supposed to be against this form of "taxation" on the innocent motorist ? Step up Mr Pickles.
Ah yes, fines. Aren't we all supposed to be against this form of "taxation" on the innocent motorist ? Step up Mr Pickles. bloodaxe
  • Score: -25

8:17am Mon 17 Mar 14

Daisy75 says...

Surely, if I remember my Highway Code, it has always been illegal to park within X metres of a junction. No need for yellow lines- at most signs to 'remind' the selfish idiots parking there that it is illegal and unsafe and is prosecutable? Plus if rubbish trucks can't get down, neither can fire engines if there is a fire.
Surely, if I remember my Highway Code, it has always been illegal to park within X metres of a junction. No need for yellow lines- at most signs to 'remind' the selfish idiots parking there that it is illegal and unsafe and is prosecutable? Plus if rubbish trucks can't get down, neither can fire engines if there is a fire. Daisy75
  • Score: 68

8:19am Mon 17 Mar 14

sniper 9964 says...

Tis simple temporary parking restrictions for bin day.
Also re training for council bin men as they are lazy sods
stop the job and knock culture
Tis simple temporary parking restrictions for bin day. Also re training for council bin men as they are lazy sods stop the job and knock culture sniper 9964
  • Score: -17

8:24am Mon 17 Mar 14

Daisy75 says...

sniper 9964 wrote:
Tis simple temporary parking restrictions for bin day.
Also re training for council bin men as they are lazy sods
stop the job and knock culture
In my experience bin men are very happy to block streets for as long as possible even when they don't need to so you'd think this was an opportunity for true job satisfaction blocking Lawrence street for half an hour
[quote][p][bold]sniper 9964[/bold] wrote: Tis simple temporary parking restrictions for bin day. Also re training for council bin men as they are lazy sods stop the job and knock culture[/p][/quote]In my experience bin men are very happy to block streets for as long as possible even when they don't need to so you'd think this was an opportunity for true job satisfaction blocking Lawrence street for half an hour Daisy75
  • Score: 33

8:39am Mon 17 Mar 14

NoNewsIsGoodNews says...

I don't agree with people blocking Farrar St, but come on bin men.......

When I was a kid the dustbin man used to scale the back wall if you forgot to put your bin out, he would then empty it, put it in the back yard, lock your gate and climb back out again. If they dropped any rubbish they would also pick it up.
For this they used to get a good tip at Christmas and had respect from the residents.
Nowadays they refuse to even touch your bin if the handle is facing the wrong way, unless its to put a sticker on it explaining what a bad person you are for not complying with their daft rules.
I don't agree with people blocking Farrar St, but come on bin men....... When I was a kid the dustbin man used to scale the back wall if you forgot to put your bin out, he would then empty it, put it in the back yard, lock your gate and climb back out again. If they dropped any rubbish they would also pick it up. For this they used to get a good tip at Christmas and had respect from the residents. Nowadays they refuse to even touch your bin if the handle is facing the wrong way, unless its to put a sticker on it explaining what a bad person you are for not complying with their daft rules. NoNewsIsGoodNews
  • Score: 83

8:54am Mon 17 Mar 14

oldgoat says...

Deafening silence from any local councillors.
Or did the press not bother to check with them?
Deafening silence from any local councillors. Or did the press not bother to check with them? oldgoat
  • Score: 13

9:04am Mon 17 Mar 14

johnwill says...

No temporary solution ?
Maybe just put a few cones out early in the morning on bin day ?
Or would that be too difficult ?
No temporary solution ? Maybe just put a few cones out early in the morning on bin day ? Or would that be too difficult ? johnwill
  • Score: 14

9:23am Mon 17 Mar 14

Pete the Brickie says...

How hard is this? There is plenty of space to stop a bin lorry on Lawrence street near the top of Farrar Street without blocking the road, the council workers have legs and the bins have wheels. Use the legs to walk down the entire 160m or .16km street, wheel the bins to the top of the street and empty the bins into the lorry as usual. Whilst this complex procedure may take slightly longer and delay a lunch time finish it is far cheaper than returning several times in large lorry, getting out, staring down the street, collectively shrugging their shoulders and leaving again until the car fairy removes the cars.
How hard is this? There is plenty of space to stop a bin lorry on Lawrence street near the top of Farrar Street without blocking the road, the council workers have legs and the bins have wheels. Use the legs to walk down the entire 160m or .16km street, wheel the bins to the top of the street and empty the bins into the lorry as usual. Whilst this complex procedure may take slightly longer and delay a lunch time finish it is far cheaper than returning several times in large lorry, getting out, staring down the street, collectively shrugging their shoulders and leaving again until the car fairy removes the cars. Pete the Brickie
  • Score: 42

9:38am Mon 17 Mar 14

the original Homer says...

A fire engine could legitimately push the cars out of its way in an emergency, but bin wagons can't do that.
However, as pointed out earlier, it is illegal to park near a junction, so yellow lines aren't required.
Putting yellow lines where they aren't needed just sends out a mixed message about all the other reasons for not parking (roundabouts, brows of hills, double white lines, single white lines, clearways, dropped kerbs etc).
Dumbing down the rules is OK, but only if you do it consistently. Marking some junctions but not others sends out the message that you can park on the ones they haven't marked. It already having been done like that elsewhere might actually be the cause of people thinking they can park on that junction.
Interesting that the spokesman considered them leaving the bin wagon on a busy junction, and only rejected that because the street was so long that it would take some time to walk up and down. That shows arrogance in his understanding, and implies he thinks it would be OK on a shorter street. My understanding is that leaving the bin wagon unattended on a busy junction would be illegal anyway, even if it was only a few bins and only a few minutes.
A fire engine could legitimately push the cars out of its way in an emergency, but bin wagons can't do that. However, as pointed out earlier, it is illegal to park near a junction, so yellow lines aren't required. Putting yellow lines where they aren't needed just sends out a mixed message about all the other reasons for not parking (roundabouts, brows of hills, double white lines, single white lines, clearways, dropped kerbs etc). Dumbing down the rules is OK, but only if you do it consistently. Marking some junctions but not others sends out the message that you can park on the ones they haven't marked. It already having been done like that elsewhere might actually be the cause of people thinking they can park on that junction. Interesting that the spokesman considered them leaving the bin wagon on a busy junction, and only rejected that because the street was so long that it would take some time to walk up and down. That shows arrogance in his understanding, and implies he thinks it would be OK on a shorter street. My understanding is that leaving the bin wagon unattended on a busy junction would be illegal anyway, even if it was only a few bins and only a few minutes. the original Homer
  • Score: 10

10:27am Mon 17 Mar 14

pedalling paul says...

Lunatic wrote:
Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.
Even better, try fining their drivers...!
[quote][p][bold]Lunatic[/bold] wrote: Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.[/p][/quote]Even better, try fining their drivers...! pedalling paul
  • Score: 14

10:28am Mon 17 Mar 14

pedalling paul says...

Lunatic wrote:
Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.
Even better, try fining their drivers...!
[quote][p][bold]Lunatic[/bold] wrote: Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.[/p][/quote]Even better, try fining their drivers...! pedalling paul
  • Score: 12

10:30am Mon 17 Mar 14

asd says...

Maybe its time to start using red lines around York. There does seem to be a bit of laziness on both sides here. I was taught you can not park near so many yard near a junction or a bend. Bin men can walk with wheelie bins as pointed out
Maybe its time to start using red lines around York. There does seem to be a bit of laziness on both sides here. I was taught you can not park near so many yard near a junction or a bend. Bin men can walk with wheelie bins as pointed out asd
  • Score: 16

10:33am Mon 17 Mar 14

roskoboskovic says...

they don t need much of an excuse not to collect.ever since fortnightly collections started we ve had our bins emptied at about 7.30 am for some reason about a month ago it s moved back to about noon.recycling collection this morning,small bin wagon but 4 men plus driver.haven t the costs of special waggons plus more binmen wiped out the savings of fortnighly collections.
they don t need much of an excuse not to collect.ever since fortnightly collections started we ve had our bins emptied at about 7.30 am for some reason about a month ago it s moved back to about noon.recycling collection this morning,small bin wagon but 4 men plus driver.haven t the costs of special waggons plus more binmen wiped out the savings of fortnighly collections. roskoboskovic
  • Score: 3

10:44am Mon 17 Mar 14

Platform9 says...

I tried to get out of my house today to go and pay my Council Tax - unfortunately I couldn't because all the bins waiting to be emptied were blocking my path.

I will try to get out tomorrow to go and pay it (or maybe the next day or the day after that?)
I tried to get out of my house today to go and pay my Council Tax - unfortunately I couldn't because all the bins waiting to be emptied were blocking my path. I will try to get out tomorrow to go and pay it (or maybe the next day or the day after that?) Platform9
  • Score: 7

11:09am Mon 17 Mar 14

the original Homer says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Lunatic wrote:
Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.
Even better, try fining their drivers...!
Well, if we're going to be pedantic, parked cars aren't being driven, so they don't have drivers.
Fines are actually issued to the registered keepers, not to the drivers. It's then up to them to either pay the fine or suggest someone else to pay them.

I agree with the original comment about issuing fines though - it probably is the easiest way to discourage illegal parking, and to raise awareness that the lack of yellow lines doesn't imply parking is OK.
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lunatic[/bold] wrote: Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.[/p][/quote]Even better, try fining their drivers...![/p][/quote]Well, if we're going to be pedantic, parked cars aren't being driven, so they don't have drivers. Fines are actually issued to the registered keepers, not to the drivers. It's then up to them to either pay the fine or suggest someone else to pay them. I agree with the original comment about issuing fines though - it probably is the easiest way to discourage illegal parking, and to raise awareness that the lack of yellow lines doesn't imply parking is OK. the original Homer
  • Score: -7

11:15am Mon 17 Mar 14

Oyy you says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Lunatic wrote:
Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.
Even better, try fining their drivers...!
Not at work today Paul or are you doing this in tax payers time.....
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lunatic[/bold] wrote: Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.[/p][/quote]Even better, try fining their drivers...![/p][/quote]Not at work today Paul or are you doing this in tax payers time..... Oyy you
  • Score: -11

11:26am Mon 17 Mar 14

YOUWILLDOASISAY says...

At any other time this would be a non-story about issues that could and should be dealt with quietly to resolve.

However what we are seeing is a big broadcast of a small issue that builds a scenario to justify the use of the councils new weapon against drivers. Easing in the use of the councils new CCTV van beyond the schools has just started, it does not require consultation with residents and provides a payback greater than the cost of painting lines etc.

This story is not about informing people of a problem, it is about justifying an intention.
At any other time this would be a non-story about issues that could and should be dealt with quietly to resolve. However what we are seeing is a big broadcast of a small issue that builds a scenario to justify the use of the councils new weapon against drivers. Easing in the use of the councils new CCTV van beyond the schools has just started, it does not require consultation with residents and provides a payback greater than the cost of painting lines etc. This story is not about informing people of a problem, it is about justifying an intention. YOUWILLDOASISAY
  • Score: 5

11:38am Mon 17 Mar 14

the original Homer says...

I don't have a problem with that camera van covering areas beyond schools. To be honest, catching vehicles parked in dangerous places such as junctions is actually easier than catching them on yellow lines, because there are fewer exceptions.
If people choose to park in dangerous places they have little defence in my book. If the camera van catches them it may even prove a worthwhile investment (I'll reserve judgement though as I'm not convinced our Council could have got something right!).
I was always unconvinced about the van catching people on yellow lines outside schools, since it would need to prove parked vs waiting. Using it to patrol junctions might actually be a better use of resources.
I don't have a problem with that camera van covering areas beyond schools. To be honest, catching vehicles parked in dangerous places such as junctions is actually easier than catching them on yellow lines, because there are fewer exceptions. If people choose to park in dangerous places they have little defence in my book. If the camera van catches them it may even prove a worthwhile investment (I'll reserve judgement though as I'm not convinced our Council could have got something right!). I was always unconvinced about the van catching people on yellow lines outside schools, since it would need to prove parked vs waiting. Using it to patrol junctions might actually be a better use of resources. the original Homer
  • Score: 6

11:43am Mon 17 Mar 14

greenmonkey says...

Daisy75 wrote:
Surely, if I remember my Highway Code, it has always been illegal to park within X metres of a junction. No need for yellow lines- at most signs to 'remind' the selfish idiots parking there that it is illegal and unsafe and is prosecutable? Plus if rubbish trucks can't get down, neither can fire engines if there is a fire.
Not illegal - Highway code states that you shouldnt park in places that create a hazard but it is up to the police to enforce (as with obstruction) and most of the time they have better things to do - if there is a regular problem they would expect the council to introduce yellow lines that they can then deal with by civil enforcement action (fines)
[quote][p][bold]Daisy75[/bold] wrote: Surely, if I remember my Highway Code, it has always been illegal to park within X metres of a junction. No need for yellow lines- at most signs to 'remind' the selfish idiots parking there that it is illegal and unsafe and is prosecutable? Plus if rubbish trucks can't get down, neither can fire engines if there is a fire.[/p][/quote]Not illegal - Highway code states that you shouldnt park in places that create a hazard but it is up to the police to enforce (as with obstruction) and most of the time they have better things to do - if there is a regular problem they would expect the council to introduce yellow lines that they can then deal with by civil enforcement action (fines) greenmonkey
  • Score: 3

11:50am Mon 17 Mar 14

greenmonkey says...

Parking, Highway code:
217: DO NOT park your vehicle or trailer on the road where it would endanger, inconvenience or obstruct pedestrians or other road users. For example, do not stop

•near a school entrance
•anywhere you would prevent access for Emergency Services
•at or near a bus stop or taxi rank
•on the approach to a level crossing
•opposite or within 10 metres (32 feet) of a junction, except in an authorised parking space
•near the brow of a hill or hump bridge
•opposite a traffic island or (if this would cause an obstruction) another parked vehicle
•where you would force other traffic to enter a tram lane
•where the kerb has been lowered to help wheelchair users
•in front of an entrance to a property
•on a bend.
Parking, Highway code: 217: DO NOT park your vehicle or trailer on the road where it would endanger, inconvenience or obstruct pedestrians or other road users. For example, do not stop •near a school entrance •anywhere you would prevent access for Emergency Services •at or near a bus stop or taxi rank •on the approach to a level crossing •opposite or within 10 metres (32 feet) of a junction, except in an authorised parking space •near the brow of a hill or hump bridge •opposite a traffic island or (if this would cause an obstruction) another parked vehicle •where you would force other traffic to enter a tram lane •where the kerb has been lowered to help wheelchair users •in front of an entrance to a property •on a bend. greenmonkey
  • Score: 9

12:00pm Mon 17 Mar 14

BL2 says...

greenmonkey wrote:
Daisy75 wrote:
Surely, if I remember my Highway Code, it has always been illegal to park within X metres of a junction. No need for yellow lines- at most signs to 'remind' the selfish idiots parking there that it is illegal and unsafe and is prosecutable? Plus if rubbish trucks can't get down, neither can fire engines if there is a fire.
Not illegal - Highway code states that you shouldnt park in places that create a hazard but it is up to the police to enforce (as with obstruction) and most of the time they have better things to do - if there is a regular problem they would expect the council to introduce yellow lines that they can then deal with by civil enforcement action (fines)
I was just going to look that up so thanks! :-) Had this problem years ago when people would regularly block a junction dangerously by parking too close to it, but when reported the police wouldn't do anything.
[quote][p][bold]greenmonkey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Daisy75[/bold] wrote: Surely, if I remember my Highway Code, it has always been illegal to park within X metres of a junction. No need for yellow lines- at most signs to 'remind' the selfish idiots parking there that it is illegal and unsafe and is prosecutable? Plus if rubbish trucks can't get down, neither can fire engines if there is a fire.[/p][/quote]Not illegal - Highway code states that you shouldnt park in places that create a hazard but it is up to the police to enforce (as with obstruction) and most of the time they have better things to do - if there is a regular problem they would expect the council to introduce yellow lines that they can then deal with by civil enforcement action (fines)[/p][/quote]I was just going to look that up so thanks! :-) Had this problem years ago when people would regularly block a junction dangerously by parking too close to it, but when reported the police wouldn't do anything. BL2
  • Score: 8

12:32pm Mon 17 Mar 14

maybejustmaybe says...

We had a similar problem around the Shipton Street area with inconsiderate office and hospital workers parking stupidly on corners of junctions. Not so long ago CYC painted double yellows on all the junctions and the problem went away instantly. Only occasionally does anyone push their luck any more.
We had a similar problem around the Shipton Street area with inconsiderate office and hospital workers parking stupidly on corners of junctions. Not so long ago CYC painted double yellows on all the junctions and the problem went away instantly. Only occasionally does anyone push their luck any more. maybejustmaybe
  • Score: 9

12:43pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Dave Taylor says...

Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that!
Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that! Dave Taylor
  • Score: 7

12:53pm Mon 17 Mar 14

oldgoat says...

Deal with the badly parked vehicles first. If they are breaking the Highway Code, sort it that way, or leaflet the cars.
Deal with the badly parked vehicles first. If they are breaking the Highway Code, sort it that way, or leaflet the cars. oldgoat
  • Score: 0

1:12pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Teabag1 says...

This needs sorting fast what if a fire engine needed to get through.
This needs sorting fast what if a fire engine needed to get through. Teabag1
  • Score: 0

1:25pm Mon 17 Mar 14

DB_4_Me says...

Since when does the implementation of road restrictions require consultation with local residents? Last month I had 20mph speed restriction signs erected outside my house, and there was certainly no attempt made to consult any residents. When addtional parking restrictions were introducted in the city centre a couple of years ago residents and businesses in the streets concerned were among those who raised objections, but local councillors told me at the time that Cllr Merrett had made up his mind and nothing was going to change it. So if you want double-yellow lines to be added anywhere, simply convince Cllr Merrett that they will force people to stop using their cars, and you'll get your yellow lines quicker that the time it takes for the paint to dry!
Since when does the implementation of road restrictions require consultation with local residents? Last month I had 20mph speed restriction signs erected outside my house, and there was certainly no attempt made to consult any residents. When addtional parking restrictions were introducted in the city centre a couple of years ago residents and businesses in the streets concerned were among those who raised objections, but local councillors told me at the time that Cllr Merrett had made up his mind and nothing was going to change it. So if you want double-yellow lines to be added anywhere, simply convince Cllr Merrett that they will force people to stop using their cars, and you'll get your yellow lines quicker that the time it takes for the paint to dry! DB_4_Me
  • Score: 16

1:44pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Yorkie41 says...

Every Bin has wheels on, there would have been enough men on the vehicle to have walked down the street and emptied them, it probably would have taken them about 5 minutes at the most. what a fuss when there is an easy solution.
Every Bin has wheels on, there would have been enough men on the vehicle to have walked down the street and emptied them, it probably would have taken them about 5 minutes at the most. what a fuss when there is an easy solution. Yorkie41
  • Score: 7

2:51pm Mon 17 Mar 14

greenmonkey says...

Teabag1 wrote:
This needs sorting fast what if a fire engine needed to get through.
Fire brigade respond as appropriate to the circumstances, if needed removing a few wing mirrors or bumping vehicles out of the way. If not, they can walk down with a ladder and fix up a hose to the nearest fire hydrant.
[quote][p][bold]Teabag1[/bold] wrote: This needs sorting fast what if a fire engine needed to get through.[/p][/quote]Fire brigade respond as appropriate to the circumstances, if needed removing a few wing mirrors or bumping vehicles out of the way. If not, they can walk down with a ladder and fix up a hose to the nearest fire hydrant. greenmonkey
  • Score: -4

3:12pm Mon 17 Mar 14

clm058 says...

its illegal to block a road when parking a car, send it the car removal truck get them compounded and lets hope a fire engine is never needed down that street.
its illegal to block a road when parking a car, send it the car removal truck get them compounded and lets hope a fire engine is never needed down that street. clm058
  • Score: -2

3:13pm Mon 17 Mar 14

clm058 says...

on that photo it looks like the residents are blocking the footpath too
on that photo it looks like the residents are blocking the footpath too clm058
  • Score: 1

4:39pm Mon 17 Mar 14

MouseHouse says...

Teabag1 has it spot on. Fire, police and ambulances need to get down these streets as and when required. This is down to the residents themselves to resolve.
Teabag1 has it spot on. Fire, police and ambulances need to get down these streets as and when required. This is down to the residents themselves to resolve. MouseHouse
  • Score: 1

5:39pm Mon 17 Mar 14

roy_batty says...

Oh dear! I see I.G. Properties have got signs up in the photo, it seems wherever they have properties there is problem with rubbish!
Oh dear! I see I.G. Properties have got signs up in the photo, it seems wherever they have properties there is problem with rubbish! roy_batty
  • Score: 6

5:46pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Igiveinthen says...

the original Homer wrote:
pedalling paul wrote:
Lunatic wrote:
Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.
Even better, try fining their drivers...!
Well, if we're going to be pedantic, parked cars aren't being driven, so they don't have drivers.
Fines are actually issued to the registered keepers, not to the drivers. It's then up to them to either pay the fine or suggest someone else to pay them.

I agree with the original comment about issuing fines though - it probably is the easiest way to discourage illegal parking, and to raise awareness that the lack of yellow lines doesn't imply parking is OK.
You have to be careful here, the question is, has the car been parked in contravention of a traffic regulation, or has the car been parked inconsiderately, if there are no regulations preventing parking then nothing can be done, and who's to judge inconsiderate parking.
I often wonder who decides to purchase the huge waste collection vehicles, I know it makes financial sense to collect as much household waste as possible in one trip, but as the council are well aware some of the of the terraced street in York are narrow why don't they purchase more suitable vehicles for these areas?
[quote][p][bold]the original Homer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lunatic[/bold] wrote: Start fining the badly parked cars. People will eventually get the message.[/p][/quote]Even better, try fining their drivers...![/p][/quote]Well, if we're going to be pedantic, parked cars aren't being driven, so they don't have drivers. Fines are actually issued to the registered keepers, not to the drivers. It's then up to them to either pay the fine or suggest someone else to pay them. I agree with the original comment about issuing fines though - it probably is the easiest way to discourage illegal parking, and to raise awareness that the lack of yellow lines doesn't imply parking is OK.[/p][/quote]You have to be careful here, the question is, has the car been parked in contravention of a traffic regulation, or has the car been parked inconsiderately, if there are no regulations preventing parking then nothing can be done, and who's to judge inconsiderate parking. I often wonder who decides to purchase the huge waste collection vehicles, I know it makes financial sense to collect as much household waste as possible in one trip, but as the council are well aware some of the of the terraced street in York are narrow why don't they purchase more suitable vehicles for these areas? Igiveinthen
  • Score: 2

7:55pm Mon 17 Mar 14

last of the mandms says...

Firstly an "I am Spartacus moment" I am Richard Bowen who drew The Press' attention to this problem. However the report does not do full justice to the facts. I have always made it clear that the problem is not limited access caused by vehicles parked legally and close to the junction with Lawrence Street, my issue has been from day one that the council is aware of the problem of limited access but has made absolutely no alttempt to alleviate or resolve it, I accept that (finally) and very reluctantly Highways have started the process of extending the No Parking i.e double yellow lines at the top of the street but until that is in place no one, neither councillor or council officer, is prepared to make any guaranteed changes to how the current refuse system works (i.e. turn up in big waggon if can't get in try, try, try again) or put in any temporary parking restrictions. Regarding the use of a smaller vehicle one was used last week however "It had been hired for a "Specific task" and we were "fortunate it was available". To hire a smalller vehicle costs approx £150 per day and assunming that the new parking restrictions take four months (i.e. eight collections) this means a cost of somewhere in the regin of £1200 pounds. bearing in mind this would also prevent or reduce the number of failed and therefore duplicated or triplicated or etc etc visits it seems a reasonable cost efficient solution to a temporary problem.
To put some context into that cost I suggest the computer litterate amongst ammuse yourselves by looking up how much COYC recently granted to Friends of Derwent Park and friends of the vegetable beds next to The City Arms to purchase gardening tools, suffice it to say the cost of a smaller vehicle is now a little more than £200. Finally there must be other streets with similar issues, if you are affected RING EMAIL AND BADGER the Council every day until it is resolved. But expect to understand what a brickwall can do to a forehead before you get any joy.
Firstly an "I am Spartacus moment" I am Richard Bowen who drew The Press' attention to this problem. However the report does not do full justice to the facts. I have always made it clear that the problem is not limited access caused by vehicles parked legally and close to the junction with Lawrence Street, my issue has been from day one that the council is aware of the problem of limited access but has made absolutely no alttempt to alleviate or resolve it, I accept that (finally) and very reluctantly Highways have started the process of extending the No Parking i.e double yellow lines at the top of the street but until that is in place no one, neither councillor or council officer, is prepared to make any guaranteed changes to how the current refuse system works (i.e. turn up in big waggon if can't get in try, try, try again) or put in any temporary parking restrictions. Regarding the use of a smaller vehicle one was used last week however "It had been hired for a "Specific task" and we were "fortunate it was available". To hire a smalller vehicle costs approx £150 per day and assunming that the new parking restrictions take four months (i.e. eight collections) this means a cost of somewhere in the regin of £1200 pounds. bearing in mind this would also prevent or reduce the number of failed and therefore duplicated or triplicated or etc etc visits it seems a reasonable cost efficient solution to a temporary problem. To put some context into that cost I suggest the computer litterate amongst ammuse yourselves by looking up how much COYC recently granted to Friends of Derwent Park and friends of the vegetable beds next to The City Arms to purchase gardening tools, suffice it to say the cost of a smaller vehicle is now a little more than £200. Finally there must be other streets with similar issues, if you are affected RING EMAIL AND BADGER the Council every day until it is resolved. But expect to understand what a brickwall can do to a forehead before you get any joy. last of the mandms
  • Score: 2

3:22am Tue 18 Mar 14

Magicman! says...

asd wrote:
Maybe its time to start using red lines around York. There does seem to be a bit of laziness on both sides here. I was taught you can not park near so many yard near a junction or a bend. Bin men can walk with wheelie bins as pointed out
There is an alarmingly rising number of either inconsiderately or dangerously parked cars in York, perhaps red lines or Red Routes is indeed the answer... and then use the camera car to enforce it.

What happens if a house down there is being refurbished and a Travis Perkins wagon shows up with bags of sand and several tonnes of bricks shows up but can't get in? would people honestly expect the operative to hand-deliver the items? Don't park in a way that blocks junction access or that could block a large vehicle from getting down a road (ie parking diagonally opposite another parked car but only leaving enough space for a car to get through)
[quote][p][bold]asd[/bold] wrote: Maybe its time to start using red lines around York. There does seem to be a bit of laziness on both sides here. I was taught you can not park near so many yard near a junction or a bend. Bin men can walk with wheelie bins as pointed out[/p][/quote]There is an alarmingly rising number of either inconsiderately or dangerously parked cars in York, perhaps red lines or Red Routes is indeed the answer... and then use the camera car to enforce it. What happens if a house down there is being refurbished and a Travis Perkins wagon shows up with bags of sand and several tonnes of bricks shows up but can't get in? would people honestly expect the operative to hand-deliver the items? Don't park in a way that blocks junction access or that could block a large vehicle from getting down a road (ie parking diagonally opposite another parked car but only leaving enough space for a car to get through) Magicman!
  • Score: 0

11:55am Tue 18 Mar 14

m dee says...

Looking at the picture how is anyone with mobility problems crutches/wheelchair poor eyesight expected to get up an down that street safely,the bin men do well getting down there without damaging any vehicles,would adding more yellow lines not make parking more difficult for the residents? local Councillors are there to sort things like this out would it not be easy to leaflet the vehicles at least the drivers would be aware they are blocking access and long term the council should have a vehicle suitable for these narrow streets.
Looking at the picture how is anyone with mobility problems crutches/wheelchair poor eyesight expected to get up an down that street safely,the bin men do well getting down there without damaging any vehicles,would adding more yellow lines not make parking more difficult for the residents? local Councillors are there to sort things like this out would it not be easy to leaflet the vehicles at least the drivers would be aware they are blocking access and long term the council should have a vehicle suitable for these narrow streets. m dee
  • Score: 3

12:21pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Fabius the Delayer says...

Dave Taylor wrote:
Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that!
Why not send two smaller vans ?? at least the job would get done and if a binn lorry turns up and can't do the job your still paying the men for that day arant you :- so its a case of
The cost of 1 large bonn lorry = no collections unhappy residents
2 small lorries = all rubbish collected and every body happy

looks to me like simple iintransigence on your part matey
[quote][p][bold]Dave Taylor[/bold] wrote: Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that![/p][/quote]Why not send two smaller vans ?? at least the job would get done and if a binn lorry turns up and can't do the job your still paying the men for that day arant you :- so its a case of The cost of 1 large bonn lorry = no collections unhappy residents 2 small lorries = all rubbish collected and every body happy looks to me like simple iintransigence on your part matey Fabius the Delayer
  • Score: 2

1:48pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Minguel says...

To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.
To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street. Minguel
  • Score: 4

2:24pm Tue 18 Mar 14

last of the mandms says...

Dave Taylor wrote:
Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that!
The press may not have asked you for a quote but I have emailed our other ward councillor (Andy D'Agorne) on several occasions and he, like the Council, have given a series of explanations as to why this happens. (I.e. excuses) but very little in the way of ideas (I.e. Solutions) .
[quote][p][bold]Dave Taylor[/bold] wrote: Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that![/p][/quote]The press may not have asked you for a quote but I have emailed our other ward councillor (Andy D'Agorne) on several occasions and he, like the Council, have given a series of explanations as to why this happens. (I.e. excuses) but very little in the way of ideas (I.e. Solutions) . last of the mandms
  • Score: 4

2:37pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Yorkie41 says...

Minguel wrote:
To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.
That is 15 bins on each side,two men on each side start at the bottom of the street the time gets shorter each time you bring a bin back, No excuse just use your common sense. where there is a will there is a way.
[quote][p][bold]Minguel[/bold] wrote: To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.[/p][/quote]That is 15 bins on each side,two men on each side start at the bottom of the street the time gets shorter each time you bring a bin back, No excuse just use your common sense. where there is a will there is a way. Yorkie41
  • Score: -4

2:50pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Minguel says...

Yorkie41 wrote:
Minguel wrote:
To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.
That is 15 bins on each side,two men on each side start at the bottom of the street the time gets shorter each time you bring a bin back, No excuse just use your common sense. where there is a will there is a way.
70 bins. 35 on each side......and mathematically it make no difference in what order you do it. Good effort though.
[quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Minguel[/bold] wrote: To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.[/p][/quote]That is 15 bins on each side,two men on each side start at the bottom of the street the time gets shorter each time you bring a bin back, No excuse just use your common sense. where there is a will there is a way.[/p][/quote]70 bins. 35 on each side......and mathematically it make no difference in what order you do it. Good effort though. Minguel
  • Score: 2

3:20pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Yorkie41 says...

Minguel wrote:
Yorkie41 wrote:
Minguel wrote:
To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.
That is 15 bins on each side,two men on each side start at the bottom of the street the time gets shorter each time you bring a bin back, No excuse just use your common sense. where there is a will there is a way.
70 bins. 35 on each side......and mathematically it make no difference in what order you do it. Good effort though.
You sound like the Union
rep ha ha.Good on Yah.
[quote][p][bold]Minguel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yorkie41[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Minguel[/bold] wrote: To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.[/p][/quote]That is 15 bins on each side,two men on each side start at the bottom of the street the time gets shorter each time you bring a bin back, No excuse just use your common sense. where there is a will there is a way.[/p][/quote]70 bins. 35 on each side......and mathematically it make no difference in what order you do it. Good effort though.[/p][/quote]You sound like the Union rep ha ha.Good on Yah. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

4:07pm Tue 18 Mar 14

NoNewsIsGoodNews says...

Minguel wrote:
To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.
Absolute garbage comment (pardon the pun)
I have seen this happen around Leeman Rd on plenty of occasions.
Two bin men walk the street and retrieve two bins each at a time, while a third does the emptying and the first two take empty bins back as they retrieve others.

Not rocket science and certainly doesn't take half an hour.
[quote][p][bold]Minguel[/bold] wrote: To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.[/p][/quote]Absolute garbage comment (pardon the pun) I have seen this happen around Leeman Rd on plenty of occasions. Two bin men walk the street and retrieve two bins each at a time, while a third does the emptying and the first two take empty bins back as they retrieve others. Not rocket science and certainly doesn't take half an hour. NoNewsIsGoodNews
  • Score: -3

4:27pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Pete the Brickie says...

Dave Taylor wrote:
Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that!
There is nothing difficult about this problem Councillor Taylor and we are already paying for a vehicle to return several times until the refuse collectors are satisfied it will go all the way down the street. This is a one off situation, it just requires a bit of effort and firm management, sadly two things my council seems incapable of unless it involves closing of roads.
[quote][p][bold]Dave Taylor[/bold] wrote: Oldgoat: The Press didn't ask me for a comment. The problem is both a simple one and a difficult one. The simple solution is that if cars weren't badly-parked then the bin wagon could get down the street and everything would be fine. If you think that isn't the solution it becomes more difficult. Farrar Street is the longest street in York which has no turning point at the end. The bin men, and any other delivery drivers, who can back the length of it without scarring someone's car do a phenomenal job. The bin wagon is a large vehicle and the smaller bin collection vehicle aren't big enough to accommodate all the refuse of Farrar Street. No-one would appreciate the Council adding to costs by having to run two trips to one street. I therefore come back to the first solution of people parking more considerately. If some additional yellow lines are needed, and the residents of Farrar Street approve of them, then let's do that![/p][/quote]There is nothing difficult about this problem Councillor Taylor and we are already paying for a vehicle to return several times until the refuse collectors are satisfied it will go all the way down the street. This is a one off situation, it just requires a bit of effort and firm management, sadly two things my council seems incapable of unless it involves closing of roads. Pete the Brickie
  • Score: 5

5:16pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Minguel says...

NoNewsIsGoodNews wrote:
Minguel wrote:
To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.
Absolute garbage comment (pardon the pun)
I have seen this happen around Leeman Rd on plenty of occasions.
Two bin men walk the street and retrieve two bins each at a time, while a third does the emptying and the first two take empty bins back as they retrieve others.

Not rocket science and certainly doesn't take half an hour.
Have you even read the story?? The whole point is that they can't get the truck down the street! I'm partailly familiar with how binmen usually work - thanks all the same for the explanation. Don't think you've bin using your brain (pardon the pun)
[quote][p][bold]NoNewsIsGoodNews[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Minguel[/bold] wrote: To all the people that are saying that the binmen are lazy and should just walk, use your brain and do a bit of simple maths. A street 160m long with 35 bins on either side. You walk 160m then back, then 160-(160/35)m then back. Even using a conservative estimates (i.e. not allowing for how long it takes the bin to be emptied into the lorry) it would take one person over an hour and a half. Obviously there isn't just one person but even with three people that's over half an hour to clear just one street.[/p][/quote]Absolute garbage comment (pardon the pun) I have seen this happen around Leeman Rd on plenty of occasions. Two bin men walk the street and retrieve two bins each at a time, while a third does the emptying and the first two take empty bins back as they retrieve others. Not rocket science and certainly doesn't take half an hour.[/p][/quote]Have you even read the story?? The whole point is that they can't get the truck down the street! I'm partailly familiar with how binmen usually work - thanks all the same for the explanation. Don't think you've bin using your brain (pardon the pun) Minguel
  • Score: 5

7:23pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Yorkie41 says...

Some of us are old enough to remember that it is not so long that the refuge collectors walked down the back lanes and carried the dustbins up each alleyway, resting the bin on their shoulder and a cap that they used to wear. to lean the bin on. I don't remember any complaints then.
Some of us are old enough to remember that it is not so long that the refuge collectors walked down the back lanes and carried the dustbins up each alleyway, resting the bin on their shoulder and a cap that they used to wear. to lean the bin on. I don't remember any complaints then. Yorkie41
  • Score: 0

10:06pm Thu 20 Mar 14

gooseberry legs says...

Badly parked cars are a real pain in the neck,in water lane facing elston close there has been a car parked on the road which holds the traffic up every day while neighbouring motorists do the sensible thing and park on the verge,during rush hour cars have had to break to avoid collisions while school children are making there way to and from school,there is a potential bad accident waiting to happen here,this stretch of road should have double yellow lines,as for the bins stick leaflets through their doors stating if you dont shift your cars your bin wont get emptied.
Badly parked cars are a real pain in the neck,in water lane facing elston close there has been a car parked on the road which holds the traffic up every day while neighbouring motorists do the sensible thing and park on the verge,during rush hour cars have had to break to avoid collisions while school children are making there way to and from school,there is a potential bad accident waiting to happen here,this stretch of road should have double yellow lines,as for the bins stick leaflets through their doors stating if you dont shift your cars your bin wont get emptied. gooseberry legs
  • Score: 1

10:11pm Thu 20 Mar 14

gooseberry legs says...

If you want your bins emptying shift your cars.
If you want your bins emptying shift your cars. gooseberry legs
  • Score: 1

11:26am Fri 21 Mar 14

last of the mandms says...

gooseberry legs wrote:
Badly parked cars are a real pain in the neck,in water lane facing elston close there has been a car parked on the road which holds the traffic up every day while neighbouring motorists do the sensible thing and park on the verge,during rush hour cars have had to break to avoid collisions while school children are making there way to and from school,there is a potential bad accident waiting to happen here,this stretch of road should have double yellow lines,as for the bins stick leaflets through their doors stating if you dont shift your cars your bin wont get emptied.
Just a minor point the vehicles which cause the problem are not usually owned by residents, they tend to be owned residents of other local streets where there is resident parking and they are avoiding paying the charge or they are walking into town or similar who again do not want ot pay parking charges.
[quote][p][bold]gooseberry legs[/bold] wrote: Badly parked cars are a real pain in the neck,in water lane facing elston close there has been a car parked on the road which holds the traffic up every day while neighbouring motorists do the sensible thing and park on the verge,during rush hour cars have had to break to avoid collisions while school children are making there way to and from school,there is a potential bad accident waiting to happen here,this stretch of road should have double yellow lines,as for the bins stick leaflets through their doors stating if you dont shift your cars your bin wont get emptied.[/p][/quote]Just a minor point the vehicles which cause the problem are not usually owned by residents, they tend to be owned residents of other local streets where there is resident parking and they are avoiding paying the charge or they are walking into town or similar who again do not want ot pay parking charges. last of the mandms
  • Score: 2

9:52am Sun 23 Mar 14

tommytuckamotor says...

Typical council jobsworths ! Yes cars do park badly . But bin lorries are the problem here (or their drivers) . I've seen them drive over grass verges (with no need they just can't reverse) hit a entry income off the wall twice at the dss offices (it's been there for years ! ) leave rubbish in the streets, only take it if it's in the bin no extra sacks allowed, block roads of for a good 10 minutes, making no attempt to pull in and let you past even if possible. Would give them a bit of exercise to get down there and move a few bins , they used to collect from every doorstep in days gone by . No sympathy for council or bin men I'm afraid .
Typical council jobsworths ! Yes cars do park badly . But bin lorries are the problem here (or their drivers) . I've seen them drive over grass verges (with no need they just can't reverse) hit a entry income off the wall twice at the dss offices (it's been there for years ! ) leave rubbish in the streets, only take it if it's in the bin no extra sacks allowed, block roads of for a good 10 minutes, making no attempt to pull in and let you past even if possible. Would give them a bit of exercise to get down there and move a few bins , they used to collect from every doorstep in days gone by . No sympathy for council or bin men I'm afraid . tommytuckamotor
  • Score: -3

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