Jenny Wyrill’s lorry leads funeral cortege

‘Driving lorries was her passion’

The coffin of Jenny Wyrill arrives on the back of her own HGV at St Lawrence’s Church, York

Jenny Wyrill, who has died aged 62

Jenny Wyrill’s HGV arrives at St Lawrence’s Church, York

First published in News
Last updated
York Press: Photograph of the Author by , mark.stead@thepress.co.uk

LONG-DISTANCE lorry driver Jenny Wyrill was never happier than when she was on the road – and her love of life behind the wheel was yesterday marked at her funeral.

Her coffin was brought to St Lawrence’s Church on the back of the cab she drove across the UK during her 42 years as a trucker, as it led the funeral cortege following her death from cancer aged 62.

The mother-of-three, who lived in Tang Hall and had worked for Nether Poppleton-based Millfield Haulage for 15 years, died on February 21. She was diagnosed with cancer in 2012 but was given the all-clear last year. In January she learned that her illness had returned. She leaves three children, Charlotte, Tara and Andrea, her father Les, widower Pete and grandson Jamie.

During yesterday’s service, a video by Andrea, who lives in Australia, of a truck journey through Sydney in her mother’s honour was shown, before Jenny’s coffin – depicting her own truck – was carried out of the church as Meat Loaf’s classic driving song Bat Out Of Hell played.

“Most people go to work, come home and that’s it, but for my mum, it was her life and what she was happiest doing,” said Charlotte.

“She was like a walking sat nav. If I was lost, I’d call her and, even though she wasn’t there, she’d somehow know the way.

She would do anything for anybody, she was always smiling and never complained about anything, even during her illness – when she was first diagnosed with cancer, all she wanted was to get back to work.

“Mum must have found it hard to be in a situation where people were looking after her, because she was so strong and never wanted a fuss. She always put everybody else first.”

Millfield Haulage managing director Ted Beat said: “She wasn’t an employee, she was a friend, and being a lorry driver was in her blood.

“She was a woman in a man’s world, somebody I can’t remember ever having a cross word with and who never had to be made to do something.

“She worked 65 hours a week whenever and wherever you wanted her to as well as keeping a home and family, which is quite an achievement.

“She will be sorely missed by us all.”

• The Press attended Jenny Wyrill’s funeral at the invitation of her family.

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