Two big York housing plans approved - 297 new homes to be built

York Press: Two big York housing plans approved - 297 new homes to be built Two big York housing plans approved - 297 new homes to be built

ALMOST 300 new homes will be built in York after two huge developments were approved tonight.

Controversial plans for 102 homes on fields in Strensall were given the go-ahead on a 9-7 vote by City of York Council's planning committee. The councillors also backed a 195-home scheme that will kickstart the £130 million city-centre Hungate project.

Linden Homes North's £12.4 million Brecks Lane scheme drew opposition from 122 residents, York Outer MP Julian Sturdy and Strensall councillor Paul Doughty.

Objector Michael Parish said the village's drains could not cope with more new development, and resident Scott Anscomb said Robert Wilkinson Primary School would be unable to take more pupils without children's education being harmed.

He raised fears about traffic and pressure on local services, saying: "We have a village which thrives, we make it work, but this development is a step too far."

Coun Doughty said the scheme was "premature" ahead of York's Local Plan being adopted and arguments for allowing it on a greenfield site were "extremely flimsy and tenuous".

After the narrow decision, he said: "I am not just dismayed, I am livid."

He said some councillors paid "little or no regard to the impact this development will have on the village, drainage on site and the surrounding road infrastructure".

Steve Irving, representing Linden Homes, said: "We don't believe this site is in the green belt, but even if it was, the reality is that York has a significant housing land shortfall - less than five years' supply - and that means a presumption in favour of sustainable development."

The Hungate scheme, approved by 11 votes to 5, will now be revived after work stalled following the completion of its first phase in 2009. The overall 720-home scheme may take until 2024 to complete, with its second stage also including space for shops, restaurants and bars.

Hungate (York) Regeneration Ltd spokesman Richard Cook said: “The development will bring much-needed homes of a high level of sustainability and quality to this historic site within the city walls.

“We believe the central location in York and proximity to key transport links, shops and restaurants will also be appealing to prospective buyers."

The developers warned in 2012 that it might be impossible for them to restart work on the Hungate site unless a new deal was agreed with the council over afforable housing and payments towards community facilities, but submitted a planning qpplication for the second phase of work last year. It will include one, two and three-bedroom flats around a central courtyard.

Council leader James Alexander said tonight: "This homes boost is great news and shows the market has confidence in York - it is further evidence that York is somewhere developers can do business."

He said the council had asked for 30 per cent of the Strensall homes to be affordable and for 16 per cent affordable housing on the Hungate brownfield site and that this showed a "flexible approach" by the authority.

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11:58pm Thu 20 Feb 14

BL2 says...

Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.
Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans. BL2

8:21am Fri 21 Feb 14

digendelve says...

BL2 wrote:
Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.
Let em build on it, it's one big flood plain and half the land is flooded now, who's going to buy a house on a flood plain after recent events?
[quote][p][bold]BL2[/bold] wrote: Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.[/p][/quote]Let em build on it, it's one big flood plain and half the land is flooded now, who's going to buy a house on a flood plain after recent events? digendelve

8:30am Fri 21 Feb 14

chelk says...

digendelve wrote:
BL2 wrote:
Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.
Let em build on it, it's one big flood plain and half the land is flooded now, who's going to buy a house on a flood plain after recent events?
People who move into the area do not know the history and are not informed by the honest estate agents
[quote][p][bold]digendelve[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BL2[/bold] wrote: Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.[/p][/quote]Let em build on it, it's one big flood plain and half the land is flooded now, who's going to buy a house on a flood plain after recent events?[/p][/quote]People who move into the area do not know the history and are not informed by the honest estate agents chelk

9:06am Fri 21 Feb 14

take 5 says...

the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students take 5

9:46am Fri 21 Feb 14

chelk says...

take 5 wrote:
the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land
[quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land chelk

10:16am Fri 21 Feb 14

take 5 says...

well said chelk i think people might start taking notice now its starting to affect them
well said chelk i think people might start taking notice now its starting to affect them take 5

10:23am Fri 21 Feb 14

Archiebold the 1st says...

chelk wrote:
digendelve wrote:
BL2 wrote: Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.
Let em build on it, it's one big flood plain and half the land is flooded now, who's going to buy a house on a flood plain after recent events?
People who move into the area do not know the history and are not informed by the honest estate agents
Well maybe not but the survey etc would pick it up and let them make an informed decision. Although once the ground is saturated with concrete the flooding will only get worse unless they create a decent drainage system. (which I’m guessing they will be instructed to)
[quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]digendelve[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BL2[/bold] wrote: Disgusting vote regarding the Strensall development. Once again showing how little the council cares about its voters when the pushing forward it's pet plans.[/p][/quote]Let em build on it, it's one big flood plain and half the land is flooded now, who's going to buy a house on a flood plain after recent events?[/p][/quote]People who move into the area do not know the history and are not informed by the honest estate agents[/p][/quote]Well maybe not but the survey etc would pick it up and let them make an informed decision. Although once the ground is saturated with concrete the flooding will only get worse unless they create a decent drainage system. (which I’m guessing they will be instructed to) Archiebold the 1st

10:33am Fri 21 Feb 14

SteveSCA says...

chelk wrote:
take 5 wrote:
the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land
Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students.

Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill.

This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm
e).

Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.
[quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land[/p][/quote]Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring. SteveSCA

10:44am Fri 21 Feb 14

HoofHearteds says...

Housing shortage = inflated prices = inability to get on the ladder. It's got to happen for all not just the lucky few.
Housing shortage = inflated prices = inability to get on the ladder. It's got to happen for all not just the lucky few. HoofHearteds

10:56am Fri 21 Feb 14

AGuyFromStrensall says...

HoofHearteds wrote:
Housing shortage = inflated prices = inability to get on the ladder. It's got to happen for all not just the lucky few.
Glad someone said it. Not everyone has had their house for 30 years and made tens of thousands of pounds on a home they bought in the 70s for a bag of pork scratchings...
[quote][p][bold]HoofHearteds[/bold] wrote: Housing shortage = inflated prices = inability to get on the ladder. It's got to happen for all not just the lucky few.[/p][/quote]Glad someone said it. Not everyone has had their house for 30 years and made tens of thousands of pounds on a home they bought in the 70s for a bag of pork scratchings... AGuyFromStrensall

11:17am Fri 21 Feb 14

take 5 says...

SteveSCA wrote:
chelk wrote:
take 5 wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land
Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.
and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really
[quote][p][bold]SteveSCA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land[/p][/quote]Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.[/p][/quote]and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really take 5

12:24pm Fri 21 Feb 14

SteveSCA says...

take 5 wrote:
SteveSCA wrote:
chelk wrote:
take 5 wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land
Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.
and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really
So - let me get this right - you're saying that to avoid a "housing shortage", the University of York (unlike every other university in the country) should have been prevented from expanding?
[quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SteveSCA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land[/p][/quote]Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.[/p][/quote]and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really[/p][/quote]So - let me get this right - you're saying that to avoid a "housing shortage", the University of York (unlike every other university in the country) should have been prevented from expanding? SteveSCA

12:33pm Fri 21 Feb 14

take 5 says...

SteveSCA wrote:
take 5 wrote:
SteveSCA wrote:
chelk wrote:
take 5 wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land
Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.
and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really
So - let me get this right - you're saying that to avoid a "housing shortage", the University of York (unlike every other university in the country) should have been prevented from expanding?
no they should have been made to build more accommodation on the new site this is why we need more housing which im all in favour for but some people arent as the problem gets pushed further out to places like strensall etc
[quote][p][bold]SteveSCA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SteveSCA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land[/p][/quote]Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.[/p][/quote]and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really[/p][/quote]So - let me get this right - you're saying that to avoid a "housing shortage", the University of York (unlike every other university in the country) should have been prevented from expanding?[/p][/quote]no they should have been made to build more accommodation on the new site this is why we need more housing which im all in favour for but some people arent as the problem gets pushed further out to places like strensall etc take 5

12:45pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Stafford_Staff says...

SteveSCA, there is a big difference between York and student accommodation in Manchester. In Manchester you have far more providers of private high density student accommodation. There is also much larger housing stock in Manchester, so students living in shared accommodation in family sized home have less impact on the overall housing stock. You can still get a two bed terrace for £60,000 in Manchester, where in similar area in York your looking at £130,000 +, and the average wages are higher in Manchester.

York needs a large amount of new homes, building dedicated student accommodation would be quick way to free up family homes given York's limited housing stock.
SteveSCA, there is a big difference between York and student accommodation in Manchester. In Manchester you have far more providers of private high density student accommodation. There is also much larger housing stock in Manchester, so students living in shared accommodation in family sized home have less impact on the overall housing stock. You can still get a two bed terrace for £60,000 in Manchester, where in similar area in York your looking at £130,000 +, and the average wages are higher in Manchester. York needs a large amount of new homes, building dedicated student accommodation would be quick way to free up family homes given York's limited housing stock. Stafford_Staff

12:58pm Fri 21 Feb 14

SteveSCA says...

take 5 wrote:
SteveSCA wrote:
take 5 wrote:
SteveSCA wrote:
chelk wrote:
take 5 wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land
Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.
and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really
So - let me get this right - you're saying that to avoid a "housing shortage", the University of York (unlike every other university in the country) should have been prevented from expanding?
no they should have been made to build more accommodation on the new site this is why we need more housing which im all in favour for but some people arent as the problem gets pushed further out to places like strensall etc
But they already have built far more accommodation. As I've already said, York University - like most universities - provides guaranteed campus accommodation for every first year student. And that remains the case, even though total student numbers have increased by almost 50% since 2005.
[quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SteveSCA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SteveSCA[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chelk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Exactly what I have been saying for a long time the Universities should be obliged to build all the accommodation needed for all students on their own land[/p][/quote]Ridiculous. There isn't a university in the country that provides accommodation for ALL its students. Like most universities, York provides guaranteed campus accommodation for all students in their first year (over 4000 rooms). But in their second and third years, most move off campus and find accommodation in the private rented sector. And like in most places, this tends to be concentrated in nearby areas, like Heslington and Badger Hill. This is the same with all universities - just go to Leeds where most of the private accommodation rented by students is in the Headingley/Hyde Park area, or Manchester (Fallowfield/Rusholm e). Students have as much right to live in those areas as anyone else, and to say that the University is the root cause of the housing shortage in York (any more than it is in any other university town/city) is a complete red herring.[/p][/quote]and this is where the problem lies the university has expanded more houses have been taken up by students contributing to the housing shortage simple really[/p][/quote]So - let me get this right - you're saying that to avoid a "housing shortage", the University of York (unlike every other university in the country) should have been prevented from expanding?[/p][/quote]no they should have been made to build more accommodation on the new site this is why we need more housing which im all in favour for but some people arent as the problem gets pushed further out to places like strensall etc[/p][/quote]But they already have built far more accommodation. As I've already said, York University - like most universities - provides guaranteed campus accommodation for every first year student. And that remains the case, even though total student numbers have increased by almost 50% since 2005. SteveSCA

1:07pm Fri 21 Feb 14

take 5 says...

steve sca - so theres 50% more 2nd and 3rd years to accommodate outside in houses aswell basic maths are we getting through to you !!!!!!!!
steve sca - so theres 50% more 2nd and 3rd years to accommodate outside in houses aswell basic maths are we getting through to you !!!!!!!! take 5

3:16pm Fri 21 Feb 14

SteveSCA says...

take 5 wrote:
steve sca - so theres 50% more 2nd and 3rd years to accommodate outside in houses aswell basic maths are we getting through to you !!!!!!!!
I think it's you that isn't getting it!!!

Yes, of course I'm fully aware that there are 50% more 2nd and 3rd years (roughly 3500 more), as well as 1st years.

So when it comes to accommodating all of these 3500 extra 2nd and 3rd years, which of the following statements do you agree with:

1. The University should have provided campus accommodation for them. (This would go beyond what any other university provides, which is guaranteed university accommodation for all 1st years.) YES/NO

2. They should have gone into the private rented sector, as they have done (adding to the housing shortage in York - basic maths as you say.) YES/NO

3. They shouldn't have existed in the first place, because the University should have been prevented from expanding (which comes back to the original question I asked you). YES/NO

Your answer to one of these options has got to be YES - there are no other options. Which is it?
[quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: steve sca - so theres 50% more 2nd and 3rd years to accommodate outside in houses aswell basic maths are we getting through to you !!!!!!!![/p][/quote]I think it's you that isn't getting it!!! Yes, of course I'm fully aware that there are 50% more 2nd and 3rd years (roughly 3500 more), as well as 1st years. So when it comes to accommodating all of these 3500 extra 2nd and 3rd years, which of the following statements do you agree with: 1. The University should have provided campus accommodation for them. (This would go beyond what any other university provides, which is guaranteed university accommodation for all 1st years.) YES/NO 2. They should have gone into the private rented sector, as they have done (adding to the housing shortage in York - basic maths as you say.) YES/NO 3. They shouldn't have existed in the first place, because the University should have been prevented from expanding (which comes back to the original question I asked you). YES/NO Your answer to one of these options has got to be YES - there are no other options. Which is it? SteveSCA

3:58pm Fri 21 Feb 14

curlygirl says...

I can't believe that this was approved. Yet again the council has seemingly ignored clear evidence and local public opinion. I really hope its not just loads more flats. That is the last thing York needs.
I moved into a new build flat in York in 2011 with the intent to buy. In just a year it went down hill and quickly started to looked like a bomb site with over crowding and poorly maintained bin and communal areas. Also many of the new propeties were given up for social housing and rentals, not first time buyers and home owners as I had been initally led to believe.
Now moved to York outskirts just to get some peace and quiet. And its much cheaper! But I'm horrified to see that it seems the invasion is set to spread outwards, with nice villages like strensall suffering the same fate as York city centre with overcrowding and noise! Is no where safe?
I can't believe that this was approved. Yet again the council has seemingly ignored clear evidence and local public opinion. I really hope its not just loads more flats. That is the last thing York needs. I moved into a new build flat in York in 2011 with the intent to buy. In just a year it went down hill and quickly started to looked like a bomb site with over crowding and poorly maintained bin and communal areas. Also many of the new propeties were given up for social housing and rentals, not first time buyers and home owners as I had been initally led to believe. Now moved to York outskirts just to get some peace and quiet. And its much cheaper! But I'm horrified to see that it seems the invasion is set to spread outwards, with nice villages like strensall suffering the same fate as York city centre with overcrowding and noise! Is no where safe? curlygirl

4:32pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Devils_advocate says...

take 5 wrote:
the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students
Why do you use the term 'greedy' landlords? I'm a landlord - I'm not greedy - just running a business - like all those greedy shopkeepers; greedy plumbers; greedy manufacturers; greedy publicans - is anyone who runs a business greedy to you?
[quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: the root of this problem lies with york council allowing the university to expand without the accommodation for its students. now hundreds if not thousands of houses on the east side of york are rented out by greedy landlords to these students pushing up house prices and stopping york people from getting on the ladder.because of this houses need building elsewhere like strensall etc yes the problem is getting pushed further away and now its starting to affect you your all up in arms but only now its affecting you it should have been stopped at the root and the university should be made to build enough accommodation for all its students[/p][/quote]Why do you use the term 'greedy' landlords? I'm a landlord - I'm not greedy - just running a business - like all those greedy shopkeepers; greedy plumbers; greedy manufacturers; greedy publicans - is anyone who runs a business greedy to you? Devils_advocate

4:46pm Fri 21 Feb 14

York_Jester says...

I live in a flat in Hungate and it's a great development. However I'm a little concerned about the new building photographs released. Phase 1 is a great building because of the open space in the courtyards and the mix of different properties.

The new building just looks like a giant block of flats with no open space, but it could just be hidden from view i guess. Plus it appears very close to the current building which i'm not sure the balcony owners will appreciate, I'm lucky as mine faces out over the Foss.

Guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks when it's up, afterall people need homes.
I live in a flat in Hungate and it's a great development. However I'm a little concerned about the new building photographs released. Phase 1 is a great building because of the open space in the courtyards and the mix of different properties. The new building just looks like a giant block of flats with no open space, but it could just be hidden from view i guess. Plus it appears very close to the current building which i'm not sure the balcony owners will appreciate, I'm lucky as mine faces out over the Foss. Guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks when it's up, afterall people need homes. York_Jester

9:16pm Fri 21 Feb 14

greenmonkey says...

York_Jester wrote:
I live in a flat in Hungate and it's a great development. However I'm a little concerned about the new building photographs released. Phase 1 is a great building because of the open space in the courtyards and the mix of different properties.

The new building just looks like a giant block of flats with no open space, but it could just be hidden from view i guess. Plus it appears very close to the current building which i'm not sure the balcony owners will appreciate, I'm lucky as mine faces out over the Foss.

Guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks when it's up, afterall people need homes.
The courtyard for the new block is behind it, though it is closer to the Foss than phase 1 so will create a fairly narrow channel between this block and Rowntrees Wharf. However it will be within easy walking or cycling distance of city centre shops and services, quite unlike the Strensall site a mile from the nearest bus stop, shops and primary school. 102 houses in such a location will generate far more traffic onto existing road networks. The arguments put forward as to why this development should go ahead 'in the green belt' could be applied to any of the draft sites in the Local plan proposals, even though they have yet to be agreed. After the floods in the south the who question of approving any new housing on land that is often holding standing water should be reviewed and new national policy issued to give a presumption against approval. If that means limiting the expansion of York and the growing pressure on our roads and sewers Im sure most residents would support this. There seems little point in providing 'affordable' homes that flood or create flooding for others.
[quote][p][bold]York_Jester[/bold] wrote: I live in a flat in Hungate and it's a great development. However I'm a little concerned about the new building photographs released. Phase 1 is a great building because of the open space in the courtyards and the mix of different properties. The new building just looks like a giant block of flats with no open space, but it could just be hidden from view i guess. Plus it appears very close to the current building which i'm not sure the balcony owners will appreciate, I'm lucky as mine faces out over the Foss. Guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks when it's up, afterall people need homes.[/p][/quote]The courtyard for the new block is behind it, though it is closer to the Foss than phase 1 so will create a fairly narrow channel between this block and Rowntrees Wharf. However it will be within easy walking or cycling distance of city centre shops and services, quite unlike the Strensall site a mile from the nearest bus stop, shops and primary school. 102 houses in such a location will generate far more traffic onto existing road networks. The arguments put forward as to why this development should go ahead 'in the green belt' could be applied to any of the draft sites in the Local plan proposals, even though they have yet to be agreed. After the floods in the south the who question of approving any new housing on land that is often holding standing water should be reviewed and new national policy issued to give a presumption against approval. If that means limiting the expansion of York and the growing pressure on our roads and sewers Im sure most residents would support this. There seems little point in providing 'affordable' homes that flood or create flooding for others. greenmonkey

5:00pm Sat 22 Feb 14

digendelve says...

greenmonkey wrote:
York_Jester wrote:
I live in a flat in Hungate and it's a great development. However I'm a little concerned about the new building photographs released. Phase 1 is a great building because of the open space in the courtyards and the mix of different properties.

The new building just looks like a giant block of flats with no open space, but it could just be hidden from view i guess. Plus it appears very close to the current building which i'm not sure the balcony owners will appreciate, I'm lucky as mine faces out over the Foss.

Guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks when it's up, afterall people need homes.
The courtyard for the new block is behind it, though it is closer to the Foss than phase 1 so will create a fairly narrow channel between this block and Rowntrees Wharf. However it will be within easy walking or cycling distance of city centre shops and services, quite unlike the Strensall site a mile from the nearest bus stop, shops and primary school. 102 houses in such a location will generate far more traffic onto existing road networks. The arguments put forward as to why this development should go ahead 'in the green belt' could be applied to any of the draft sites in the Local plan proposals, even though they have yet to be agreed. After the floods in the south the who question of approving any new housing on land that is often holding standing water should be reviewed and new national policy issued to give a presumption against approval. If that means limiting the expansion of York and the growing pressure on our roads and sewers Im sure most residents would support this. There seems little point in providing 'affordable' homes that flood or create flooding for others.
Totally agree, let's face it this council would approve a block of flats on a roundabout if they could get away with it. As for the floods the water has to go some where, lets hope they get decent flood insurance. The council didn't even resolve the drainage questions before approval.
[quote][p][bold]greenmonkey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]York_Jester[/bold] wrote: I live in a flat in Hungate and it's a great development. However I'm a little concerned about the new building photographs released. Phase 1 is a great building because of the open space in the courtyards and the mix of different properties. The new building just looks like a giant block of flats with no open space, but it could just be hidden from view i guess. Plus it appears very close to the current building which i'm not sure the balcony owners will appreciate, I'm lucky as mine faces out over the Foss. Guess we'll just have to wait and see how it looks when it's up, afterall people need homes.[/p][/quote]The courtyard for the new block is behind it, though it is closer to the Foss than phase 1 so will create a fairly narrow channel between this block and Rowntrees Wharf. However it will be within easy walking or cycling distance of city centre shops and services, quite unlike the Strensall site a mile from the nearest bus stop, shops and primary school. 102 houses in such a location will generate far more traffic onto existing road networks. The arguments put forward as to why this development should go ahead 'in the green belt' could be applied to any of the draft sites in the Local plan proposals, even though they have yet to be agreed. After the floods in the south the who question of approving any new housing on land that is often holding standing water should be reviewed and new national policy issued to give a presumption against approval. If that means limiting the expansion of York and the growing pressure on our roads and sewers Im sure most residents would support this. There seems little point in providing 'affordable' homes that flood or create flooding for others.[/p][/quote]Totally agree, let's face it this council would approve a block of flats on a roundabout if they could get away with it. As for the floods the water has to go some where, lets hope they get decent flood insurance. The council didn't even resolve the drainage questions before approval. digendelve

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