York Green Party members protest at rail sell-off

York Press: The Green Party Euro candidate, Councillor Andrew Cooper, left, and party members hand out leaflets at York Railway station The Green Party Euro candidate, Councillor Andrew Cooper, left, and party members hand out leaflets at York Railway station

GREEN campaigners gathered at York Railway Station to urge travellers to oppose Government plans to re-privatise the East Coast service.

Members of York Green Party handed out leaflets and talked to passengers at the station at the weekend.

Andrew Coopers, the party’s lead candidate for the European Parliament in Yorkshire and Humber, claimed the recent announcement of three short-listed bidders for the East Coast franchise underlined the irony of the Government’s “ideological obsession” with privatisation.

Mr Coopers said: “The current three bidders include Keolis/Eurostar, which is owned by the French state. They are bidding to take over more UK rail services, whilst keeping their own railways firmly in the public sector where they provide high-quality services and rail fares at around a third of the cost in the UK.

“This is no way to run our railways.”

He said that since East Coast was made public in 2009, it had returned £800 million to the Government, whilst the private operators that came before it had failed to make the books balance.

York Green Party chair Denise Craghill said: “The Green Party in York is very pleased to support the campaign by rail unions and passenger groups to return our railways to public control.”

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8:24am Thu 30 Jan 14

nearlyman says...

.....and a commitment to pubic ownership is also an ideological obsession. Hardly surprising the French want to come in when you observe the chaos caused by union domination of the industry over there.But thats socialism for you............and now the socialist French president is bidding to become all time least popular French President (...and not just with Ms. Trierwieler.)
Fortunate that the wheel got invented before the Greens did, otherwise they would have opposed that and had a very bumpy bandwagon to ride on !
.....and a commitment to pubic ownership is also an ideological obsession. Hardly surprising the French want to come in when you observe the chaos caused by union domination of the industry over there.But thats socialism for you............and now the socialist French president is bidding to become all time least popular French President (...and not just with Ms. Trierwieler.) Fortunate that the wheel got invented before the Greens did, otherwise they would have opposed that and had a very bumpy bandwagon to ride on ! nearlyman

8:49am Thu 30 Jan 14

MouseHouse says...

"ideological obsession" - not quite. Some things are natural monopolies - energy, rail and water for example. The nonsense that currently is the state of our railways costs us far more then BR did, and we end up with some of the highest fares in Europe. It's a lose / lose for the public.

The Green agenda is the way to a happier, more equitable and more sustainable future. The difficulty is that very few governments have the luxury of taking a long term view. Mrs. Thatcher and Tony Blair did in the full knowledge that the opposition of the time were wholly unelectable, and both of those were right wing privatisers.
"ideological obsession" - not quite. Some things are natural monopolies - energy, rail and water for example. The nonsense that currently is the state of our railways costs us far more then BR did, and we end up with some of the highest fares in Europe. It's a lose / lose for the public. The Green agenda is the way to a happier, more equitable and more sustainable future. The difficulty is that very few governments have the luxury of taking a long term view. Mrs. Thatcher and Tony Blair did in the full knowledge that the opposition of the time were wholly unelectable, and both of those were right wing privatisers. MouseHouse

10:44am Thu 30 Jan 14

YorkPatrol says...

MouseHouse wrote:
"ideological obsession" - not quite. Some things are natural monopolies - energy, rail and water for example. The nonsense that currently is the state of our railways costs us far more then BR did, and we end up with some of the highest fares in Europe. It's a lose / lose for the public. The Green agenda is the way to a happier, more equitable and more sustainable future. The difficulty is that very few governments have the luxury of taking a long term view. Mrs. Thatcher and Tony Blair did in the full knowledge that the opposition of the time were wholly unelectable, and both of those were right wing privatisers.
Rail travel is a much improved experience when compared to the dark days of BR. Privatisation, albeit not perfect has made the railway better – only a non traveller with no experience of rail travel under BR could deny that, or a few that are stuck in the steam age where only two trains ran per day.

The railways are currently more expensive due to the amount of investment required for expansion and improvement of the railway infrastructure - much needed due to years of underfunding and neglect under BR and the disaster that was Railtrack whereby the company was run by aging, stubborn and disgruntled ex BR directors/managers
[quote][p][bold]MouseHouse[/bold] wrote: "ideological obsession" - not quite. Some things are natural monopolies - energy, rail and water for example. The nonsense that currently is the state of our railways costs us far more then BR did, and we end up with some of the highest fares in Europe. It's a lose / lose for the public. The Green agenda is the way to a happier, more equitable and more sustainable future. The difficulty is that very few governments have the luxury of taking a long term view. Mrs. Thatcher and Tony Blair did in the full knowledge that the opposition of the time were wholly unelectable, and both of those were right wing privatisers.[/p][/quote]Rail travel is a much improved experience when compared to the dark days of BR. Privatisation, albeit not perfect has made the railway better – only a non traveller with no experience of rail travel under BR could deny that, or a few that are stuck in the steam age where only two trains ran per day. The railways are currently more expensive due to the amount of investment required for expansion and improvement of the railway infrastructure - much needed due to years of underfunding and neglect under BR and the disaster that was Railtrack whereby the company was run by aging, stubborn and disgruntled ex BR directors/managers YorkPatrol

10:44am Thu 30 Jan 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account..

There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.
French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account.. There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate. Ignatius Lumpopo

10:45am Thu 30 Jan 14

ReginaldBiscuit says...

Spot on the Greens.

Look at the egregious failures of privatization over the past 30 years.

UK Railways - Some of the highest rail fares in the world.

UK Energy - Some of the highest energy prices in the world.

Special privatization mentions as well to bus services, prisons, social care, public/private information technology initiatives & strategic partnerships not forgetting hospital cleaning. Disasters the lot of them. God forbid this current lot get their talons into the NHS.
Spot on the Greens. Look at the egregious failures of privatization over the past 30 years. UK Railways - Some of the highest rail fares in the world. UK Energy - Some of the highest energy prices in the world. Special privatization mentions as well to bus services, prisons, social care, public/private information technology initiatives & strategic partnerships not forgetting hospital cleaning. Disasters the lot of them. God forbid this current lot get their talons into the NHS. ReginaldBiscuit

11:34am Thu 30 Jan 14

Alf Garnett says...

nearlyman wrote:
.....and a commitment to pubic ownership is also an ideological obsession. Hardly surprising the French want to come in when you observe the chaos caused by union domination of the industry over there.But thats socialism for you............and now the socialist French president is bidding to become all time least popular French President (...and not just with Ms. Trierwieler.)
Fortunate that the wheel got invented before the Greens did, otherwise they would have opposed that and had a very bumpy bandwagon to ride on !
I would have thought that with your clear-headed sense of business acumen you would have thought it better to leave well alone rather than pitching to replace West Coast with something as fraught with difficulty as Sir/Lord/whatever Richard Branson's subsidy-needy West Coast service. If the railways are poor (though they're not nearly as poor as we pretend) it has little to do with the unions. British Railways were never allowed to borrow or lease on open markets as were SNCF for instance and had one hand tied behind their backs. This led to underinvestment; nothing to do with the unions. Does it not strike you as odd that foreign state-owned enterprises buy up our open-market utility and transport companies ? Where do you think a lot of the money goes ? Do you think they do it as a charitable activity to help us out ? Part of the reason for the success of overseas companies, state or private is that their management wasn't hide-bound by generations of incompetence born of an education system where, in the private sector where many of them were educated, business and "trade" were dirty words. Before we all start indulging in schadenfreude at the current French problems, remember that they have reconstructed their infrastructure, we're only just beginning. They also had a clear energy policy, while we face the likelihood of power cuts due not to the unions but a ridiculous "free market" in energy which gives money to overseas investors and ministerial incompetence over many years, most of them Tory. By the way, what is the opposite of socialism ? Bonne chance.
[quote][p][bold]nearlyman[/bold] wrote: .....and a commitment to pubic ownership is also an ideological obsession. Hardly surprising the French want to come in when you observe the chaos caused by union domination of the industry over there.But thats socialism for you............and now the socialist French president is bidding to become all time least popular French President (...and not just with Ms. Trierwieler.) Fortunate that the wheel got invented before the Greens did, otherwise they would have opposed that and had a very bumpy bandwagon to ride on ![/p][/quote]I would have thought that with your clear-headed sense of business acumen you would have thought it better to leave well alone rather than pitching to replace West Coast with something as fraught with difficulty as Sir/Lord/whatever Richard Branson's subsidy-needy West Coast service. If the railways are poor (though they're not nearly as poor as we pretend) it has little to do with the unions. British Railways were never allowed to borrow or lease on open markets as were SNCF for instance and had one hand tied behind their backs. This led to underinvestment; nothing to do with the unions. Does it not strike you as odd that foreign state-owned enterprises buy up our open-market utility and transport companies ? Where do you think a lot of the money goes ? Do you think they do it as a charitable activity to help us out ? Part of the reason for the success of overseas companies, state or private is that their management wasn't hide-bound by generations of incompetence born of an education system where, in the private sector where many of them were educated, business and "trade" were dirty words. Before we all start indulging in schadenfreude at the current French problems, remember that they have reconstructed their infrastructure, we're only just beginning. They also had a clear energy policy, while we face the likelihood of power cuts due not to the unions but a ridiculous "free market" in energy which gives money to overseas investors and ministerial incompetence over many years, most of them Tory. By the way, what is the opposite of socialism ? Bonne chance. Alf Garnett

11:35am Thu 30 Jan 14

Alf Garnett says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account..

There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.
Germany.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account.. There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.[/p][/quote]Germany. Alf Garnett

11:38am Thu 30 Jan 14

Alf Garnett says...

Alf Garnett wrote:
Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account..

There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.
Germany.
Ever taken a Northern Rail ride to Morecambe from Leeds ?
[quote][p][bold]Alf Garnett[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account.. There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.[/p][/quote]Germany.[/p][/quote]Ever taken a Northern Rail ride to Morecambe from Leeds ? Alf Garnett

11:52am Thu 30 Jan 14

Alf Garnett says...

Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account..

There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.
Belgium. Catch a train there and the timetable will tell you which platform the train goes from. In Germany, as you approach a station, the announcement, in German and English, will tell you which platform connecting services leave from. Many West European stations have announcements in English and the local language. No railway service runs absolutely on time (except Japan) and could hardly be expected to, like planes and buses and cars they all have delays. SNCF may or may not be a money pit but you can get across the country, which is big, pretty easily and quickly. There are poor local services in places but as I said above, some regional cross country routes in this country can be a bit South American. Take the train from Edinburgh to Plymouth any afternoon, five coaches often not very clean, poor "catering" and the prospect of a cramped nine hours. One thing which SNCF has done is wipe out a lot of the domestic air travel. We have some way to go.
[quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account.. There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.[/p][/quote]Belgium. Catch a train there and the timetable will tell you which platform the train goes from. In Germany, as you approach a station, the announcement, in German and English, will tell you which platform connecting services leave from. Many West European stations have announcements in English and the local language. No railway service runs absolutely on time (except Japan) and could hardly be expected to, like planes and buses and cars they all have delays. SNCF may or may not be a money pit but you can get across the country, which is big, pretty easily and quickly. There are poor local services in places but as I said above, some regional cross country routes in this country can be a bit South American. Take the train from Edinburgh to Plymouth any afternoon, five coaches often not very clean, poor "catering" and the prospect of a cramped nine hours. One thing which SNCF has done is wipe out a lot of the domestic air travel. We have some way to go. Alf Garnett

1:39pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

Alf Garnett wrote:
Ignatius Lumpopo wrote:
French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account..

There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.
Belgium. Catch a train there and the timetable will tell you which platform the train goes from. In Germany, as you approach a station, the announcement, in German and English, will tell you which platform connecting services leave from. Many West European stations have announcements in English and the local language. No railway service runs absolutely on time (except Japan) and could hardly be expected to, like planes and buses and cars they all have delays. SNCF may or may not be a money pit but you can get across the country, which is big, pretty easily and quickly. There are poor local services in places but as I said above, some regional cross country routes in this country can be a bit South American. Take the train from Edinburgh to Plymouth any afternoon, five coaches often not very clean, poor "catering" and the prospect of a cramped nine hours. One thing which SNCF has done is wipe out a lot of the domestic air travel. We have some way to go.
Finland came out top in an international survey, Britain (excluding NI) second. Yes, Belgian and German info is pretty impressive (and a lot of similar information is available in this country but, for some reason, is rarely published) but their railways are part privatised too. And I'll stick with what i say about the SNCF. Try and get from Geneva to Bordeaux at the speed you can travel from Leeds to Bristol without going via the capita. And some of those German trains around the Baltic can be pretty pokey...
[quote][p][bold]Alf Garnett[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ignatius Lumpopo[/bold] wrote: French railways - high quality services? Hardly. Just because the TGVs streaking through the empty countryside at hugely subsidised cost look good doesn't mean they're high quality services. Try trundling cross-country on French trains - chances are you'll be turfed onto a bus because they've given up repairing the track. Local regional trains, even the new ones, are filthy dirty, daubed in graffiti and notorious for being delayed - and, unlike the UK, you don't get your money back if they're delayed. And the strikes? Don't get me started. State ownership of French railways is a money pit, and because it's the state wasting the money, it can't be held to account.. There's only one country in Europe with a better train service than the UK and that's Finland. And it's only better because it's tiny and not as difficult to coordinate.[/p][/quote]Belgium. Catch a train there and the timetable will tell you which platform the train goes from. In Germany, as you approach a station, the announcement, in German and English, will tell you which platform connecting services leave from. Many West European stations have announcements in English and the local language. No railway service runs absolutely on time (except Japan) and could hardly be expected to, like planes and buses and cars they all have delays. SNCF may or may not be a money pit but you can get across the country, which is big, pretty easily and quickly. There are poor local services in places but as I said above, some regional cross country routes in this country can be a bit South American. Take the train from Edinburgh to Plymouth any afternoon, five coaches often not very clean, poor "catering" and the prospect of a cramped nine hours. One thing which SNCF has done is wipe out a lot of the domestic air travel. We have some way to go.[/p][/quote]Finland came out top in an international survey, Britain (excluding NI) second. Yes, Belgian and German info is pretty impressive (and a lot of similar information is available in this country but, for some reason, is rarely published) but their railways are part privatised too. And I'll stick with what i say about the SNCF. Try and get from Geneva to Bordeaux at the speed you can travel from Leeds to Bristol without going via the capita. And some of those German trains around the Baltic can be pretty pokey... Ignatius Lumpopo

5:23pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Caecilius says...

YorkPatrol wrote:
MouseHouse wrote:
"ideological obsession" - not quite. Some things are natural monopolies - energy, rail and water for example. The nonsense that currently is the state of our railways costs us far more then BR did, and we end up with some of the highest fares in Europe. It's a lose / lose for the public. The Green agenda is the way to a happier, more equitable and more sustainable future. The difficulty is that very few governments have the luxury of taking a long term view. Mrs. Thatcher and Tony Blair did in the full knowledge that the opposition of the time were wholly unelectable, and both of those were right wing privatisers.
Rail travel is a much improved experience when compared to the dark days of BR. Privatisation, albeit not perfect has made the railway better – only a non traveller with no experience of rail travel under BR could deny that, or a few that are stuck in the steam age where only two trains ran per day.

The railways are currently more expensive due to the amount of investment required for expansion and improvement of the railway infrastructure - much needed due to years of underfunding and neglect under BR and the disaster that was Railtrack whereby the company was run by aging, stubborn and disgruntled ex BR directors/managers
I had something like a quarter of a century of regular rail travel with BR. Yes, the service was often poor - but fares were reasonable: I could afford the freedom to decide where I wanted to take a leisure trip on the spur of the moment, and the flexibility to catch the trains that suited me best on the day. Moreover, when something went wrong, there was no doubt who was accountable. Since privatisation, I've travelled widely with companies like Central Trains, WAGN and Cross Country, who were/are as bad as BR ever was. Late running, failure to honour reservations, clapped-out trains breaking down or pulling down power lines, bringing the whole ECML to a grinding halt...... On one recent return journey north, all three trains - run by three different companies - were late (the first one only had to come from the York carriage sheds but the crew just CBA), the reserved seats we had on two of them weren't reserved, and the other one turned up late, then promptly broke down at the platform, so we all had to decamp to a spare set that luckily happened to be parked up elsewhere on Newcastle station. Morpeth station (run by Northern Rail) was cold, dark, unmanned and insecure, with all the waiting facilities locked up - nice, when your train's half an hour late. A similar thing happened last time we ventured to Norwich. And in return for this level of service, you either pay sky-high fares (and, via your taxes, more subsidy to the private sector 'businesses' (sic) than BR ever got) or have to shackle yourself well in advance to specific trains. By the far the best quality service is provided by East Coast - we need it returned to the failed dogma of privatisation like we need a hole in the head.
[quote][p][bold]YorkPatrol[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MouseHouse[/bold] wrote: "ideological obsession" - not quite. Some things are natural monopolies - energy, rail and water for example. The nonsense that currently is the state of our railways costs us far more then BR did, and we end up with some of the highest fares in Europe. It's a lose / lose for the public. The Green agenda is the way to a happier, more equitable and more sustainable future. The difficulty is that very few governments have the luxury of taking a long term view. Mrs. Thatcher and Tony Blair did in the full knowledge that the opposition of the time were wholly unelectable, and both of those were right wing privatisers.[/p][/quote]Rail travel is a much improved experience when compared to the dark days of BR. Privatisation, albeit not perfect has made the railway better – only a non traveller with no experience of rail travel under BR could deny that, or a few that are stuck in the steam age where only two trains ran per day. The railways are currently more expensive due to the amount of investment required for expansion and improvement of the railway infrastructure - much needed due to years of underfunding and neglect under BR and the disaster that was Railtrack whereby the company was run by aging, stubborn and disgruntled ex BR directors/managers[/p][/quote]I had something like a quarter of a century of regular rail travel with BR. Yes, the service was often poor - but fares were reasonable: I could afford the freedom to decide where I wanted to take a leisure trip on the spur of the moment, and the flexibility to catch the trains that suited me best on the day. Moreover, when something went wrong, there was no doubt who was accountable. Since privatisation, I've travelled widely with companies like Central Trains, WAGN and Cross Country, who were/are as bad as BR ever was. Late running, failure to honour reservations, clapped-out trains breaking down or pulling down power lines, bringing the whole ECML to a grinding halt...... On one recent return journey north, all three trains - run by three different companies - were late (the first one only had to come from the York carriage sheds but the crew just CBA), the reserved seats we had on two of them weren't reserved, and the other one turned up late, then promptly broke down at the platform, so we all had to decamp to a spare set that luckily happened to be parked up elsewhere on Newcastle station. Morpeth station (run by Northern Rail) was cold, dark, unmanned and insecure, with all the waiting facilities locked up - nice, when your train's half an hour late. A similar thing happened last time we ventured to Norwich. And in return for this level of service, you either pay sky-high fares (and, via your taxes, more subsidy to the private sector 'businesses' (sic) than BR ever got) or have to shackle yourself well in advance to specific trains. By the far the best quality service is provided by East Coast - we need it returned to the failed dogma of privatisation like we need a hole in the head. Caecilius

2:52am Fri 31 Jan 14

Magicman! says...

Our current railway situation is due to a hotchpotch of part-private and part-public sections... Network Rail is a public company, yet the train operating companies are private... the TOC's get charged to use the tracks which are maintained by the public company... there's more holes than a sieve in the current setup.

BUT, the current ECML services run by East Coast work - they are the best they have ever been since the first 2-3 years of GNER. Ever since then the service provision went downhill as the government demanded higher and higher premium payments from the company running trains on the route, right up until National Express's east coast division went bankrupt: and it was excessive premium payment demands that made the company go bankrupt.

Re-privatising the ECML route will NOT work, it will just cause another company to go bankrupt. It might not be until 2020, but it will happen.
Our current railway situation is due to a hotchpotch of part-private and part-public sections... Network Rail is a public company, yet the train operating companies are private... the TOC's get charged to use the tracks which are maintained by the public company... there's more holes than a sieve in the current setup. BUT, the current ECML services run by East Coast work - they are the best they have ever been since the first 2-3 years of GNER. Ever since then the service provision went downhill as the government demanded higher and higher premium payments from the company running trains on the route, right up until National Express's east coast division went bankrupt: and it was excessive premium payment demands that made the company go bankrupt. Re-privatising the ECML route will NOT work, it will just cause another company to go bankrupt. It might not be until 2020, but it will happen. Magicman!

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