York Book Fair attendance figures expected to have topped 1,000 for the first time

York Press: June Yates admires her book-themed book ends at York Book Fair at the racecourse June Yates admires her book-themed book ends at York Book Fair at the racecourse

ORGANISERS of a celebration of books held in York this weekend hope it will have broken visitor records.

The York Book Fair returned to York Racecourse for the 12th time in as many years on Saturday, with York author Toni Bunnell the star attraction as she signed copies of her new The Fidgit, a collection of fairy stories, and chatted about her writing, music – and love of hedgehogs.

Attendance figures are expected to have topped 1,000 for the first time.

More than 120 sellers exhibited at the country’s largest one-day book fair, with more than 40,000 second-hand and antiquarian books on sale alongside prints, maps and ephemera.

Toni has been writing songs since she was ten and has published five e-books, while she is also a wildlife biologist and runs a York hedgehog rescue centre.

Fair manager Arthur Cunningham said: “The number of people who come to the fair increases every year.

“Most of the dealers were happy and there were a lot of smiles, handshakes and slaps on the back at the end, so we’re very pleased with how it went.”

The fair is organised by the Provincial Booksellers Fairs Association, founded in York in 1974. It has more than 400 members and holds more than 100 book fairs each year, including another at the Racecourse in September.

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5:09pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Caecilius says...

Well, I'ld like to suggest that, if the organisers are determined to insist that everybody has to hand in their coat before they go in, they should resource their makeshift cloakroom properly. Having to queue up while two young ladies do their best to process everyone's coat and bags, then queue up all over again to get a ticket, doesn't get things off to a good start. When I came to leave, there was complete chaos in the 'cloakroom' - in reality, just a small area into which a couple of clothes rails had been jammed. Despite giving everyone a numbered ticket, the staff were struggling to find the matching item among all the clothes and bags squeezed onto the rails (apparently at random), draped over chairs or crammed into odd corners. They'd even had to allow one gentleman behind the counter so he could hunt for his property himself - and he was still searching for it when I finally got my own coat back. Meanwhile, other people were coming in and queuing up to hand their coats in.

None of the other book fair venues that I've been to over the last 30 years or so - bar one - have found this measure necessary, although they're attended by many of the same traders and if anything, being in a smaller space, are more crowded. The single exception I can think of was the Barbican, when this same fair used to be held there.
Well, I'ld like to suggest that, if the organisers are determined to insist that everybody has to hand in their coat before they go in, they should resource their makeshift cloakroom properly. Having to queue up while two young ladies do their best to process everyone's coat and bags, then queue up all over again to get a ticket, doesn't get things off to a good start. When I came to leave, there was complete chaos in the 'cloakroom' - in reality, just a small area into which a couple of clothes rails had been jammed. Despite giving everyone a numbered ticket, the staff were struggling to find the matching item among all the clothes and bags squeezed onto the rails (apparently at random), draped over chairs or crammed into odd corners. They'd even had to allow one gentleman behind the counter so he could hunt for his property himself - and he was still searching for it when I finally got my own coat back. Meanwhile, other people were coming in and queuing up to hand their coats in. None of the other book fair venues that I've been to over the last 30 years or so - bar one - have found this measure necessary, although they're attended by many of the same traders and if anything, being in a smaller space, are more crowded. The single exception I can think of was the Barbican, when this same fair used to be held there. Caecilius

5:34pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Garrowby Turnoff says...

Caecilius wrote:
Well, I'ld like to suggest that, if the organisers are determined to insist that everybody has to hand in their coat before they go in, they should resource their makeshift cloakroom properly. Having to queue up while two young ladies do their best to process everyone's coat and bags, then queue up all over again to get a ticket, doesn't get things off to a good start. When I came to leave, there was complete chaos in the 'cloakroom' - in reality, just a small area into which a couple of clothes rails had been jammed. Despite giving everyone a numbered ticket, the staff were struggling to find the matching item among all the clothes and bags squeezed onto the rails (apparently at random), draped over chairs or crammed into odd corners. They'd even had to allow one gentleman behind the counter so he could hunt for his property himself - and he was still searching for it when I finally got my own coat back. Meanwhile, other people were coming in and queuing up to hand their coats in.

None of the other book fair venues that I've been to over the last 30 years or so - bar one - have found this measure necessary, although they're attended by many of the same traders and if anything, being in a smaller space, are more crowded. The single exception I can think of was the Barbican, when this same fair used to be held there.
Did the books have jackets?
[quote][p][bold]Caecilius[/bold] wrote: Well, I'ld like to suggest that, if the organisers are determined to insist that everybody has to hand in their coat before they go in, they should resource their makeshift cloakroom properly. Having to queue up while two young ladies do their best to process everyone's coat and bags, then queue up all over again to get a ticket, doesn't get things off to a good start. When I came to leave, there was complete chaos in the 'cloakroom' - in reality, just a small area into which a couple of clothes rails had been jammed. Despite giving everyone a numbered ticket, the staff were struggling to find the matching item among all the clothes and bags squeezed onto the rails (apparently at random), draped over chairs or crammed into odd corners. They'd even had to allow one gentleman behind the counter so he could hunt for his property himself - and he was still searching for it when I finally got my own coat back. Meanwhile, other people were coming in and queuing up to hand their coats in. None of the other book fair venues that I've been to over the last 30 years or so - bar one - have found this measure necessary, although they're attended by many of the same traders and if anything, being in a smaller space, are more crowded. The single exception I can think of was the Barbican, when this same fair used to be held there.[/p][/quote]Did the books have jackets? Garrowby Turnoff

8:44pm Wed 15 Jan 14

adam reith says...

Caecilius wrote:
Well, I'ld like to suggest that, if the organisers are determined to insist that everybody has to hand in their coat before they go in, they should resource their makeshift cloakroom properly. Having to queue up while two young ladies do their best to process everyone's coat and bags, then queue up all over again to get a ticket, doesn't get things off to a good start. When I came to leave, there was complete chaos in the 'cloakroom' - in reality, just a small area into which a couple of clothes rails had been jammed. Despite giving everyone a numbered ticket, the staff were struggling to find the matching item among all the clothes and bags squeezed onto the rails (apparently at random), draped over chairs or crammed into odd corners. They'd even had to allow one gentleman behind the counter so he could hunt for his property himself - and he was still searching for it when I finally got my own coat back. Meanwhile, other people were coming in and queuing up to hand their coats in.

None of the other book fair venues that I've been to over the last 30 years or so - bar one - have found this measure necessary, although they're attended by many of the same traders and if anything, being in a smaller space, are more crowded. The single exception I can think of was the Barbican, when this same fair used to be held there.
Fair comment. As one of the organisers I think I can say that we'll probably scrap the cloakroom next time round.
[quote][p][bold]Caecilius[/bold] wrote: Well, I'ld like to suggest that, if the organisers are determined to insist that everybody has to hand in their coat before they go in, they should resource their makeshift cloakroom properly. Having to queue up while two young ladies do their best to process everyone's coat and bags, then queue up all over again to get a ticket, doesn't get things off to a good start. When I came to leave, there was complete chaos in the 'cloakroom' - in reality, just a small area into which a couple of clothes rails had been jammed. Despite giving everyone a numbered ticket, the staff were struggling to find the matching item among all the clothes and bags squeezed onto the rails (apparently at random), draped over chairs or crammed into odd corners. They'd even had to allow one gentleman behind the counter so he could hunt for his property himself - and he was still searching for it when I finally got my own coat back. Meanwhile, other people were coming in and queuing up to hand their coats in. None of the other book fair venues that I've been to over the last 30 years or so - bar one - have found this measure necessary, although they're attended by many of the same traders and if anything, being in a smaller space, are more crowded. The single exception I can think of was the Barbican, when this same fair used to be held there.[/p][/quote]Fair comment. As one of the organisers I think I can say that we'll probably scrap the cloakroom next time round. adam reith

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