Trees at Beningbrough Hall named among the best in North Yorkshire

York Press: Tom Longridge, gardener at Beningbrough Hall, with the Duke of Cambridge variegated oak planted by the last Duke to hold the title in 1898 Tom Longridge, gardener at Beningbrough Hall, with the Duke of Cambridge variegated oak planted by the last Duke to hold the title in 1898

TREES at a North Yorkshire stately home have been named among the best in the county.

The Tree Register, a national database, has identified four “champion” trees at Beningbrough Hall and Gardens, after the gardener Tom Longridge read about the scheme.

He said: “I found out about champion trees some time ago: the tallest and largest trees for each species in the country.

“Browsing through the register in a bookstore I couldn’t help but feel some of the Beningbrough trees were not only beautiful but might be in with a chance.”

Tom and his team had recently cleared a great deal of shrubbery at the National Trust site, and a particularly rare variety of beech was made accessible.

The Cockscomb Beech in the American Garden has only been in cultivation since the 1830s but is one of the larger trees on the property and experts were brought in to check its height, girth and estimated age.

A team from the Tree Registry came to take measurements, and confirmed it is a Yorkshire champion.

They also found the largest of the cherry trees on the Cherry Lawn is a Yorkshire champion for girth, the whitebeam in the playground is a Yorkshire champion for height and the Hungarian oak near the estate yard is a Yorkshire champion for height and girth.

Tom said: “I have my favourite trees in the garden, and discovering we have champion trees has not changed that, but now I have greater appreciation for those notable trees that hitherto might have been overlooked.”

The site is open to the public and guided garden tours will be held from March 1.

Comments (2)

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12:21pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Ignatius Lumpopo says...

As a truly arboreal ignoramus, I love trees, but I love them even more when they have a label identifying them on their trunk. Places like York's Museum Gardens have the occasional name plaque on their trees - but can we have more, please? Hasn't the Tree Registry a warehouse full of them they could go around nailing into trunks as they undertake their national appraisals? It's not a lot of use them knowing what everything is and not letting the rest of us learn.
As a truly arboreal ignoramus, I love trees, but I love them even more when they have a label identifying them on their trunk. Places like York's Museum Gardens have the occasional name plaque on their trees - but can we have more, please? Hasn't the Tree Registry a warehouse full of them they could go around nailing into trunks as they undertake their national appraisals? It's not a lot of use them knowing what everything is and not letting the rest of us learn. Ignatius Lumpopo
  • Score: 3

4:14pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Priapus says...

Good job, that tree doesn't belong to York Council they'd have it chopped down in an instant. Look at those branches - one might fall on a child!
Good job, that tree doesn't belong to York Council they'd have it chopped down in an instant. Look at those branches - one might fall on a child! Priapus
  • Score: 3

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