Longer waits for patients at York Hospital’s A&E

York Press: Ambulances queue at York Hospital Ambulances queue at York Hospital

NEW evidence showing the extent of York Hospital’s A&E crisis has emerged as it struggles to cope with longer waiting times, missed targets, and reduced staff numbers.

Last year, 64 patients waited more than twelve hours in A&E before being discharged or moved to another department. This is more than seven times the number of patients who had to wait over 12 hours in 2011/12.

Campaigners claim the waiting times are “a local symptom of a national problem”, but said there needed to be “more local input” into the hospital trust and one described the figures as “alarming”.

One patient had to wait for nearly 24 hours to be treated, the figures released under the Freedom of Information Act reveal. This compares to the longest waiting time of 15 hours 32 minutes in 2011/12.

At weekends there is just one consultant available from 8am to 10pm, while overnight there is no on-site consultant. One middle grade doctor is available in the emergency department overnight to support the consultant throughout the week, and during weekends. The hospital says its coverage is “better than most.”

Some patients have had to be cared for in a corridor until a suitable clinical space was made available.

A recent report by Vale of York CCG found that in September the hospital missed its targets for the percentage of patients that wait no longer than four hours in A & E. The target of 95 per cent has missed by 878 incidents resulting in an actual performance of 92.8 per cent.

The report says staffing levels are now being reviewed as a result.

Dr Mick Phythian, of Defend The NHS York, said the increase in waiting times was “a local symptom of a national problem caused by the coalition Government spending on bureaucracy rather than patient needs.”

Martin Brampton of Keep Our NHS Public said: “The figures are alarming, especially as the York NHS Walk-in Centre has been relocated into the emergency department of York Hospital.”

A spokeswoman for York Teaching Hospital said: “Year on year there has been an increase in attendance at A&E. Throughout the year there are inevitably peaks and troughs in demand and last winter the hospital had a prolonged spell on red alert which had an effect on our Emergency Departments.

“This was due to a combination of being at the peak of winter pressures, where we see a lot more very sick patients, and a prolonged outbreak of a diarrhoea and vomiting virus which closed wards and reduced available beds.”

She said staff worked tirelessly to ensure patients were prioritised according to clinical needs and said that regrettably meant some had to wait longer than others, as at all hospitals.

She said: “We are working hard to improve our performance as we would not want any of our patients waiting an excessive length of time.

“Despite these pressures, we are pleased that most of our patients give positive feedback.”

Comments (20)

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9:46am Mon 6 Jan 14

Shouter says...

And this is before the 22,000 new homes are built! If it can't cope now, imagine what it will be like with at least another 50,000 people living in York.
And this is before the 22,000 new homes are built! If it can't cope now, imagine what it will be like with at least another 50,000 people living in York. Shouter

10:16am Mon 6 Jan 14

Digeorge says...

I see them working very hard, a job I would hate to do but am surprised that there is no consultant during the weekend. Pretty poor really, given that I have a brother who is in a similar position in another hospital and does work weekends.

But my visit to A&E, well it wasn't what they diagnosed me with but something that should have been treated and admitted which has now being diagnosed properly in Newcastle. A little thought into the matter when the condition is entirely complicated and the extensive medical records were on the system would have been appreciated.

A few bloods on the long wait would have aided it from the triage nurse would have speeded the process as would the nurse contacting the consultant or on-call registrar directly. That didn't happen.

Something also radically needs to happen with complex patients like myself who are mostly managed in the community but has a multi-disciplinary team, the communication does not seem to happen when in A&E and no doubt they will be treating me if having a seizure as 'epilepsy' when I have 'hypoparathyroidism' and require calcium or looking at drugs.

I have also seen patients in corridors during my trips to see my consultant.
I see them working very hard, a job I would hate to do but am surprised that there is no consultant during the weekend. Pretty poor really, given that I have a brother who is in a similar position in another hospital and does work weekends. But my visit to A&E, well it wasn't what they diagnosed me with but something that should have been treated and admitted which has now being diagnosed properly in Newcastle. A little thought into the matter when the condition is entirely complicated and the extensive medical records were on the system would have been appreciated. A few bloods on the long wait would have aided it from the triage nurse would have speeded the process as would the nurse contacting the consultant or on-call registrar directly. That didn't happen. Something also radically needs to happen with complex patients like myself who are mostly managed in the community but has a multi-disciplinary team, the communication does not seem to happen when in A&E and no doubt they will be treating me if having a seizure as 'epilepsy' when I have 'hypoparathyroidism' and require calcium or looking at drugs. I have also seen patients in corridors during my trips to see my consultant. Digeorge

10:59am Mon 6 Jan 14

Digeorge says...

I would also like to see a proper plan for those patients with extremely complicated cases like myself and have a clinical co-ordinator appointed to manage these patients whilst in hospital. I became a 'vulnerable adult' due to medical abuse in 2013 because of what has happened in my care at two hospitals locally, one of which apologised to me for the other day for the standards of care which I have received over the years and became apparent in Newcastle.

My medical abuse starts with the wrong medical professionals and only vulnerable as to when in hospital as a result of rarity and complexity. There are some people in that hospital who still believe certain doctors who are no longer in my care and gone down the wrong track.
I would also like to see a proper plan for those patients with extremely complicated cases like myself and have a clinical co-ordinator appointed to manage these patients whilst in hospital. I became a 'vulnerable adult' due to medical abuse in 2013 because of what has happened in my care at two hospitals locally, one of which apologised to me for the other day for the standards of care which I have received over the years and became apparent in Newcastle. My medical abuse starts with the wrong medical professionals and only vulnerable as to when in hospital as a result of rarity and complexity. There are some people in that hospital who still believe certain doctors who are no longer in my care and gone down the wrong track. Digeorge

11:35am Mon 6 Jan 14

markymmark says...

At weekends there is just one consultant available from 8am to 10pm, while overnight there is no on-site consultant. One middle grade doctor is available in the emergency department overnight to support the consultant throughout the week, and during weekends. The hospital says its coverage is “better than most.”

Unless of course you are - (a) Rich
(b) Famous
or (c) even better - both of the above !
At weekends there is just one consultant available from 8am to 10pm, while overnight there is no on-site consultant. One middle grade doctor is available in the emergency department overnight to support the consultant throughout the week, and during weekends. The hospital says its coverage is “better than most.” Unless of course you are - (a) Rich (b) Famous or (c) even better - both of the above ! markymmark

11:49am Mon 6 Jan 14

Daisy75 says...

We wouldn't be in this situation if the last government hadn't allowed GPs to give up on call work to out of hours services that are barely manned and staffed by expensive locum doctors from all over the place. And at the same time doubled their salaries... There is no incentive for GPs to go back to doing evening and weekends, so this situation will continue.
We wouldn't be in this situation if the last government hadn't allowed GPs to give up on call work to out of hours services that are barely manned and staffed by expensive locum doctors from all over the place. And at the same time doubled their salaries... There is no incentive for GPs to go back to doing evening and weekends, so this situation will continue. Daisy75

12:14pm Mon 6 Jan 14

CHISSY1 says...

Daisy75 wrote:
We wouldn't be in this situation if the last government hadn't allowed GPs to give up on call work to out of hours services that are barely manned and staffed by expensive locum doctors from all over the place. And at the same time doubled their salaries... There is no incentive for GPs to go back to doing evening and weekends, so this situation will continue.
It is no good banging on apportioning blame on governments,they are all the same,out of touch,useless,lying,
two faced idiots. Who con gullible people into voting for them.
[quote][p][bold]Daisy75[/bold] wrote: We wouldn't be in this situation if the last government hadn't allowed GPs to give up on call work to out of hours services that are barely manned and staffed by expensive locum doctors from all over the place. And at the same time doubled their salaries... There is no incentive for GPs to go back to doing evening and weekends, so this situation will continue.[/p][/quote]It is no good banging on apportioning blame on governments,they are all the same,out of touch,useless,lying, two faced idiots. Who con gullible people into voting for them. CHISSY1

12:19pm Mon 6 Jan 14

meme says...

Perhaps if we all thought twice about attending the A and E units for things that are not urgent but could be dealt with later then they would not be under such pressure
its called accident and emergency and it should do what it says on tin not 'colds,sprains and scrapes!'
Perhaps if we all thought twice about attending the A and E units for things that are not urgent but could be dealt with later then they would not be under such pressure its called accident and emergency and it should do what it says on tin not 'colds,sprains and scrapes!' meme

12:26pm Mon 6 Jan 14

yorkshirelad says...

Lots of axes to grind whenever health comes up, but anyway.

In terms of GPs, the old system of your own doctor being on call when the surgery was closed is dead in the water. Rocketing demand and changing attitudes eventually made that impossible. But, there is an out-of-hours GP system 24/7/265 whenever the surgeries are closed...it's staffed by qualified GPs and pretending this service doesn't exist is no excuse to misuse A&E.

Although politically some people like to go on about the new contract for GPs, sadly the evidence does not back this. The Kings Fund nailed this one in April this year ...see http://www.kingsfund
.org.uk/blog/2013/04
/are-accident-and-em
ergency-attendances-
increasing... they simply changed the way A&E attendances were counted at roughly the same time the GP contract changes came in.

Using out-of-hours GP services and A&E responsibly will help but in reality as demand rises we need to ask serious questions about funding both GP out of hours services but also A&E.
Lots of axes to grind whenever health comes up, but anyway. In terms of GPs, the old system of your own doctor being on call when the surgery was closed is dead in the water. Rocketing demand and changing attitudes eventually made that impossible. But, there is an out-of-hours GP system 24/7/265 whenever the surgeries are closed...it's staffed by qualified GPs and pretending this service doesn't exist is no excuse to misuse A&E. Although politically some people like to go on about the new contract for GPs, sadly the evidence does not back this. The Kings Fund nailed this one in April this year ...see http://www.kingsfund .org.uk/blog/2013/04 /are-accident-and-em ergency-attendances- increasing... they simply changed the way A&E attendances were counted at roughly the same time the GP contract changes came in. Using out-of-hours GP services and A&E responsibly will help but in reality as demand rises we need to ask serious questions about funding both GP out of hours services but also A&E. yorkshirelad

1:23pm Mon 6 Jan 14

Digeorge says...

Lots of axes to grind whenever health comes up, but anyway here goes:

PLEASE NOTE THE WORD "APOLOGY" was astonished but the events over the past year that have transpired have taken me back 20 years to the start of my patient pathway here in Yorkshire! Three consultants including I have to say a Medical Director near York. Very long overdue, shame that hospital can't do the same.

"Using out-of-hours GP services and A&E responsibly will help but in reality as demand rises we need to ask serious questions about funding both GP out of hours services but also A&E".

Thanks to Yorvik Medical Practice in supporting me through this difficult patient pathway and the Endocrinology team at York. As for the Dr Bull-**** glad to get rid of them and don't need any more! Nobody at that practice envisaged the same events happening in 2010 again, it did.
Lots of axes to grind whenever health comes up, but anyway here goes: PLEASE NOTE THE WORD "APOLOGY" was astonished but the events over the past year that have transpired have taken me back 20 years to the start of my patient pathway here in Yorkshire! Three consultants including I have to say a Medical Director near York. Very long overdue, shame that hospital can't do the same. "Using out-of-hours GP services and A&E responsibly will help but in reality as demand rises we need to ask serious questions about funding both GP out of hours services but also A&E". Thanks to Yorvik Medical Practice in supporting me through this difficult patient pathway and the Endocrinology team at York. As for the Dr Bull-**** glad to get rid of them and don't need any more! Nobody at that practice envisaged the same events happening in 2010 again, it did. Digeorge

2:02pm Mon 6 Jan 14

smudge2 says...

NEW evidence showing the extent of York Hospital’s A&E crisis has emerged as it struggles to cope with longer waiting times, missed targets, and reduced staff numbers.....and more migrants using the NHS that have not paid into the system or use it privately and then go back to there own country without paying..Try doing this in any other country apart fron the UK and see what happens.
NEW evidence showing the extent of York Hospital’s A&E crisis has emerged as it struggles to cope with longer waiting times, missed targets, and reduced staff numbers.....and more migrants using the NHS that have not paid into the system or use it privately and then go back to there own country without paying..Try doing this in any other country apart fron the UK and see what happens. smudge2

2:17pm Mon 6 Jan 14

Stroppiness says...

yorkshirelad wrote:
Lots of axes to grind whenever health comes up, but anyway. In terms of GPs, the old system of your own doctor being on call when the surgery was closed is dead in the water. Rocketing demand and changing attitudes eventually made that impossible. But, there is an out-of-hours GP system 24/7/265 whenever the surgeries are closed...it's staffed by qualified GPs and pretending this service doesn't exist is no excuse to misuse A&E. Although politically some people like to go on about the new contract for GPs, sadly the evidence does not back this. The Kings Fund nailed this one in April this year ...see http://www.kingsfund .org.uk/blog/2013/04 /are-accident-and-em ergency-attendances- increasing... they simply changed the way A&E attendances were counted at roughly the same time the GP contract changes came in. Using out-of-hours GP services and A&E responsibly will help but in reality as demand rises we need to ask serious questions about funding both GP out of hours services but also A&E.
"But, there is an out-of-hours GP system 24/7/265 whenever the surgeries are closed...it's staffed by qualified GPs and pretending this service doesn't exist is no excuse to misuse A&E."

I agree that A&E is misused, and I don't know where you live, but if in York, you are in for a shock. There is NO GP out of hours service any longer for the majority of York GP patients. The only out of hours service for me and lots more patients is that "wouldn't use it even if I was dying" number, 111. That is the service that Minster Health use, and as far as I'm aware, most surgeries in York. That phone line isn't staffed by nurses or doctors, so no concrete clinical advice there - it's staffed by school leavers and non clinical people reading off a crib sheet - I know because I have a friend who works for it and even she says she would never rely on the advice given on that help line. As soon as you mention "chest pain" or "migraine type headache" they signpost yoou to A&E in any event. The NHS drop in centre moved to A & E at least 18 months ago and that is staffed by nurses, not doctors.

This is a genuine question - could you enlighten us (if you are in York) to the GP surgery you belong to and which has a GP staffed out of hours service? Or are you making sweeping assumptions that people can have access to a GP because it is not something that you have had to use recently?
[quote][p][bold]yorkshirelad[/bold] wrote: Lots of axes to grind whenever health comes up, but anyway. In terms of GPs, the old system of your own doctor being on call when the surgery was closed is dead in the water. Rocketing demand and changing attitudes eventually made that impossible. But, there is an out-of-hours GP system 24/7/265 whenever the surgeries are closed...it's staffed by qualified GPs and pretending this service doesn't exist is no excuse to misuse A&E. Although politically some people like to go on about the new contract for GPs, sadly the evidence does not back this. The Kings Fund nailed this one in April this year ...see http://www.kingsfund .org.uk/blog/2013/04 /are-accident-and-em ergency-attendances- increasing... they simply changed the way A&E attendances were counted at roughly the same time the GP contract changes came in. Using out-of-hours GP services and A&E responsibly will help but in reality as demand rises we need to ask serious questions about funding both GP out of hours services but also A&E.[/p][/quote]"But, there is an out-of-hours GP system 24/7/265 whenever the surgeries are closed...it's staffed by qualified GPs and pretending this service doesn't exist is no excuse to misuse A&E." I agree that A&E is misused, and I don't know where you live, but if in York, you are in for a shock. There is NO GP out of hours service any longer for the majority of York GP patients. The only out of hours service for me and lots more patients is that "wouldn't use it even if I was dying" number, 111. That is the service that Minster Health use, and as far as I'm aware, most surgeries in York. That phone line isn't staffed by nurses or doctors, so no concrete clinical advice there - it's staffed by school leavers and non clinical people reading off a crib sheet - I know because I have a friend who works for it and even she says she would never rely on the advice given on that help line. As soon as you mention "chest pain" or "migraine type headache" they signpost yoou to A&E in any event. The NHS drop in centre moved to A & E at least 18 months ago and that is staffed by nurses, not doctors. This is a genuine question - could you enlighten us (if you are in York) to the GP surgery you belong to and which has a GP staffed out of hours service? Or are you making sweeping assumptions that people can have access to a GP because it is not something that you have had to use recently? Stroppiness

4:53pm Mon 6 Jan 14

Phil(ip) Hall says...

George Osborne says it time for the British public to fac "hard truths". The truth is that the state has effectively declared war on society for the benefit of the rich. While the rich are protected (given open, free and unlimited access to all the best that our civilization has to offer; free to exercise their money power without responsibility or restraint), the rest of us are lectured about the virtues of personal responsibility and austerity.

However, if we really want to understand what is happening, not only to UK but in the capitalist world in general, then we have to look beyond monied individuals (who should nevertheless be held to account) and look at the whole picture.

As a world economic system capitalism is inherently and increasingly crisis prone: that's its “natural” state. In fact, since the 1970s the rate of crises has speeded up with crises regularly occurring throughout every decade. So, what does that mean for contemporary capitalism and the future of the welfare state.?

According to David Harvey: A crisis is “(a)n irrational, rationalizer of an irrational system; the irrationality of the system right now being masses of capital and masses of labour side by side in the midst of a world that is full of social need.

How stupid is that?

The rationalization that capital is looking for is the re-establishment of the basis for the extraction of surpluses: to re-establish the profit rate. The irrationality in which they (capitalists) are going about this is to actually suppress these possibilities by suppressing labour and suppressing the circulation of capital.

As socialists there is another way of rationalizing; the big question is how to take all that equipment and all that labour and put it together so that it meets human need? That is the rationality that we should be looking for right now, at a moment of crisis, at a moment of opportunity to think about the transition to socialism”.

Make no mistake, austerity is a class project the aim of which is to roll back the advances made by working people for the further enrichment of the ruling class. Austerity isn't intended as a short/medium term measure, it is, as Cameron said, forever.

Surrounded by the opulence of the Guildhall’s grandest room, Cameron addressed 900 rich and well-pampered guests enjoying a sumptuous banquet, courtesy of the City of London Corporation. He used the annual speech at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet to declare that the devastating austerity being imposed by his government will be “permanent.”

Chancellor George Osborne’s Autumn Statement announced further billions in spending and welfare cuts. The “recovery” hailed by Osborne is actually the slowest in more than 100 years, with the economy more than 3 percent smaller than before the 2008 crash.

The UK economy has only been able to remain afloat through a guarantee of cheap money via the £375 billion of quantitative easing that been made available to the banks. This could rise to as much as £425 billion.

Through the progressive commodification of the means of social reproduction (education, health, welfare, etc.), the neoliberal state has engineered a social catastrophe. The goal is to finally destroy what remains of the Keynesian welfare state that emerged during the long post war boom, and replace it with a neoliberal "workfare" state.

Whereas the role of the state in the Keynesian model was to try to extend the social rights of its citizens, the "workfare" model is concerned to provide welfare services that benefit business, both national and international. The net result is that the needs of the individual/society will take second place to capital accumulation forever.

Permanent austerity is a class project under taken by states on behalf of the rich. It is class war pure and simple.
George Osborne says it time for the British public to fac "hard truths". The truth is that the state has effectively declared war on society for the benefit of the rich. While the rich are protected (given open, free and unlimited access to all the best that our civilization has to offer; free to exercise their money power without responsibility or restraint), the rest of us are lectured about the virtues of personal responsibility and austerity. However, if we really want to understand what is happening, not only to UK but in the capitalist world in general, then we have to look beyond monied individuals (who should nevertheless be held to account) and look at the whole picture. As a world economic system capitalism is inherently and increasingly crisis prone: that's its “natural” state. In fact, since the 1970s the rate of crises has speeded up with crises regularly occurring throughout every decade. So, what does that mean for contemporary capitalism and the future of the welfare state.? According to David Harvey: A crisis is “(a)n irrational, rationalizer of an irrational system; the irrationality of the system right now being masses of capital and masses of labour side by side in the midst of a world that is full of social need. How stupid is that? The rationalization that capital is looking for is the re-establishment of the basis for the extraction of surpluses: to re-establish the profit rate. The irrationality in which they (capitalists) are going about this is to actually suppress these possibilities by suppressing labour and suppressing the circulation of capital. As socialists there is another way of rationalizing; the big question is how to take all that equipment and all that labour and put it together so that it meets human need? That is the rationality that we should be looking for right now, at a moment of crisis, at a moment of opportunity to think about the transition to socialism”. Make no mistake, austerity is a class project the aim of which is to roll back the advances made by working people for the further enrichment of the ruling class. Austerity isn't intended as a short/medium term measure, it is, as Cameron said, forever. Surrounded by the opulence of the Guildhall’s grandest room, Cameron addressed 900 rich and well-pampered guests enjoying a sumptuous banquet, courtesy of the City of London Corporation. He used the annual speech at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet to declare that the devastating austerity being imposed by his government will be “permanent.” Chancellor George Osborne’s Autumn Statement announced further billions in spending and welfare cuts. The “recovery” hailed by Osborne is actually the slowest in more than 100 years, with the economy more than 3 percent smaller than before the 2008 crash. The UK economy has only been able to remain afloat through a guarantee of cheap money via the £375 billion of quantitative easing that been made available to the banks. This could rise to as much as £425 billion. Through the progressive commodification of the means of social reproduction (education, health, welfare, etc.), the neoliberal state has engineered a social catastrophe. The goal is to finally destroy what remains of the Keynesian welfare state that emerged during the long post war boom, and replace it with a neoliberal "workfare" state. Whereas the role of the state in the Keynesian model was to try to extend the social rights of its citizens, the "workfare" model is concerned to provide welfare services that benefit business, both national and international. The net result is that the needs of the individual/society will take second place to capital accumulation forever. Permanent austerity is a class project under taken by states on behalf of the rich. It is class war pure and simple. Phil(ip) Hall

5:44pm Mon 6 Jan 14

Teabag1 says...

What the hell are we paying for! god help us
What the hell are we paying for! god help us Teabag1

6:02pm Mon 6 Jan 14

spottycow says...

I THINK ITS THE MONKEYS IN CHARGE WHO ARE TO BLAME NOT THE HARDWORKING STAFF .
I THINK ITS THE MONKEYS IN CHARGE WHO ARE TO BLAME NOT THE HARDWORKING STAFF . spottycow

7:29am Tue 7 Jan 14

mortandindi says...

This isn't news... the A&E department has been a disaster for years. The doctors on duty are a total liability and should not be in the job at all. The clerical staff have no sense of urgency and only after having to get forceful do they ever do anything. I have personally been mis-diagnosed four times in York A&E in the last eight years!! the worst being told I had a torn hamstring only to find out nearly six months later that I have broken my leg in two places. Close it down until new staff with some sort of IQ can be found. To be honest the rest of the hospital is not much better either.
This isn't news... the A&E department has been a disaster for years. The doctors on duty are a total liability and should not be in the job at all. The clerical staff have no sense of urgency and only after having to get forceful do they ever do anything. I have personally been mis-diagnosed four times in York A&E in the last eight years!! the worst being told I had a torn hamstring only to find out nearly six months later that I have broken my leg in two places. Close it down until new staff with some sort of IQ can be found. To be honest the rest of the hospital is not much better either. mortandindi

8:52am Tue 7 Jan 14

nearlyman says...

If I have cause to attend, I am happy to wait if there are more urgent cases than mine. Patients must accept prioritisation dependent on the severity of their condition. If their condition worsens they will be seen sooner. Whilst not wishing to belittle 'complex medical conditions', this is a service for 'what it says on the tin', Accidents and emergencies,and should be used as such. Longer term problems should be dealt with elsewhere in the service. I am sure we would all like to be seen immediately, but realistically it simply is not possible.
If I have cause to attend, I am happy to wait if there are more urgent cases than mine. Patients must accept prioritisation dependent on the severity of their condition. If their condition worsens they will be seen sooner. Whilst not wishing to belittle 'complex medical conditions', this is a service for 'what it says on the tin', Accidents and emergencies,and should be used as such. Longer term problems should be dealt with elsewhere in the service. I am sure we would all like to be seen immediately, but realistically it simply is not possible. nearlyman

10:45am Tue 7 Jan 14

YorkPatrol says...

Phil(ip) Hall wrote:
George Osborne says it time for the British public to fac "hard truths". The truth is that the state has effectively declared war on society for the benefit of the rich. While the rich are protected (given open, free and unlimited access to all the best that our civilization has to offer; free to exercise their money power without responsibility or restraint), the rest of us are lectured about the virtues of personal responsibility and austerity. However, if we really want to understand what is happening, not only to UK but in the capitalist world in general, then we have to look beyond monied individuals (who should nevertheless be held to account) and look at the whole picture. As a world economic system capitalism is inherently and increasingly crisis prone: that's its “natural” state. In fact, since the 1970s the rate of crises has speeded up with crises regularly occurring throughout every decade. So, what does that mean for contemporary capitalism and the future of the welfare state.? According to David Harvey: A crisis is “(a)n irrational, rationalizer of an irrational system; the irrationality of the system right now being masses of capital and masses of labour side by side in the midst of a world that is full of social need. How stupid is that? The rationalization that capital is looking for is the re-establishment of the basis for the extraction of surpluses: to re-establish the profit rate. The irrationality in which they (capitalists) are going about this is to actually suppress these possibilities by suppressing labour and suppressing the circulation of capital. As socialists there is another way of rationalizing; the big question is how to take all that equipment and all that labour and put it together so that it meets human need? That is the rationality that we should be looking for right now, at a moment of crisis, at a moment of opportunity to think about the transition to socialism”. Make no mistake, austerity is a class project the aim of which is to roll back the advances made by working people for the further enrichment of the ruling class. Austerity isn't intended as a short/medium term measure, it is, as Cameron said, forever. Surrounded by the opulence of the Guildhall’s grandest room, Cameron addressed 900 rich and well-pampered guests enjoying a sumptuous banquet, courtesy of the City of London Corporation. He used the annual speech at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet to declare that the devastating austerity being imposed by his government will be “permanent.” Chancellor George Osborne’s Autumn Statement announced further billions in spending and welfare cuts. The “recovery” hailed by Osborne is actually the slowest in more than 100 years, with the economy more than 3 percent smaller than before the 2008 crash. The UK economy has only been able to remain afloat through a guarantee of cheap money via the £375 billion of quantitative easing that been made available to the banks. This could rise to as much as £425 billion. Through the progressive commodification of the means of social reproduction (education, health, welfare, etc.), the neoliberal state has engineered a social catastrophe. The goal is to finally destroy what remains of the Keynesian welfare state that emerged during the long post war boom, and replace it with a neoliberal "workfare" state. Whereas the role of the state in the Keynesian model was to try to extend the social rights of its citizens, the "workfare" model is concerned to provide welfare services that benefit business, both national and international. The net result is that the needs of the individual/society will take second place to capital accumulation forever. Permanent austerity is a class project under taken by states on behalf of the rich. It is class war pure and simple.
What do you suggest then, Communism?

A “rich and poor divide”, like it or not is an absolute requirement to make a country tick – it’s what drives people to better themselves, educate themselves, start businesses and work up the career ladder. Everyone is driven by money even if it is just to live a moderate lifestyle. People at the lower end of the scale don’t like it (jealousy perhaps) but you simply can not blame the wealthy. A prime example of this is Richard Branson, a self made billionaire with a net worth of 4.6b, an entrepreneur with a drive for wealth and success but at the same time employing thousands of staff worldwide through global enterprises. Had it not been for his aspirations to be a wealthy man and live like a king, many would not be in employment and unable to put food on their tables. There are many that have also become extremely wealthy themselves on the back of Richard’s enterprises
[quote][p][bold]Phil(ip) Hall[/bold] wrote: George Osborne says it time for the British public to fac "hard truths". The truth is that the state has effectively declared war on society for the benefit of the rich. While the rich are protected (given open, free and unlimited access to all the best that our civilization has to offer; free to exercise their money power without responsibility or restraint), the rest of us are lectured about the virtues of personal responsibility and austerity. However, if we really want to understand what is happening, not only to UK but in the capitalist world in general, then we have to look beyond monied individuals (who should nevertheless be held to account) and look at the whole picture. As a world economic system capitalism is inherently and increasingly crisis prone: that's its “natural” state. In fact, since the 1970s the rate of crises has speeded up with crises regularly occurring throughout every decade. So, what does that mean for contemporary capitalism and the future of the welfare state.? According to David Harvey: A crisis is “(a)n irrational, rationalizer of an irrational system; the irrationality of the system right now being masses of capital and masses of labour side by side in the midst of a world that is full of social need. How stupid is that? The rationalization that capital is looking for is the re-establishment of the basis for the extraction of surpluses: to re-establish the profit rate. The irrationality in which they (capitalists) are going about this is to actually suppress these possibilities by suppressing labour and suppressing the circulation of capital. As socialists there is another way of rationalizing; the big question is how to take all that equipment and all that labour and put it together so that it meets human need? That is the rationality that we should be looking for right now, at a moment of crisis, at a moment of opportunity to think about the transition to socialism”. Make no mistake, austerity is a class project the aim of which is to roll back the advances made by working people for the further enrichment of the ruling class. Austerity isn't intended as a short/medium term measure, it is, as Cameron said, forever. Surrounded by the opulence of the Guildhall’s grandest room, Cameron addressed 900 rich and well-pampered guests enjoying a sumptuous banquet, courtesy of the City of London Corporation. He used the annual speech at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet to declare that the devastating austerity being imposed by his government will be “permanent.” Chancellor George Osborne’s Autumn Statement announced further billions in spending and welfare cuts. The “recovery” hailed by Osborne is actually the slowest in more than 100 years, with the economy more than 3 percent smaller than before the 2008 crash. The UK economy has only been able to remain afloat through a guarantee of cheap money via the £375 billion of quantitative easing that been made available to the banks. This could rise to as much as £425 billion. Through the progressive commodification of the means of social reproduction (education, health, welfare, etc.), the neoliberal state has engineered a social catastrophe. The goal is to finally destroy what remains of the Keynesian welfare state that emerged during the long post war boom, and replace it with a neoliberal "workfare" state. Whereas the role of the state in the Keynesian model was to try to extend the social rights of its citizens, the "workfare" model is concerned to provide welfare services that benefit business, both national and international. The net result is that the needs of the individual/society will take second place to capital accumulation forever. Permanent austerity is a class project under taken by states on behalf of the rich. It is class war pure and simple.[/p][/quote]What do you suggest then, Communism? A “rich and poor divide”, like it or not is an absolute requirement to make a country tick – it’s what drives people to better themselves, educate themselves, start businesses and work up the career ladder. Everyone is driven by money even if it is just to live a moderate lifestyle. People at the lower end of the scale don’t like it (jealousy perhaps) but you simply can not blame the wealthy. A prime example of this is Richard Branson, a self made billionaire with a net worth of 4.6b, an entrepreneur with a drive for wealth and success but at the same time employing thousands of staff worldwide through global enterprises. Had it not been for his aspirations to be a wealthy man and live like a king, many would not be in employment and unable to put food on their tables. There are many that have also become extremely wealthy themselves on the back of Richard’s enterprises YorkPatrol

10:49am Tue 7 Jan 14

inthesticks says...

mortandindi wrote:
This isn't news... the A&E department has been a disaster for years. The doctors on duty are a total liability and should not be in the job at all. The clerical staff have no sense of urgency and only after having to get forceful do they ever do anything. I have personally been mis-diagnosed four times in York A&E in the last eight years!! the worst being told I had a torn hamstring only to find out nearly six months later that I have broken my leg in two places. Close it down until new staff with some sort of IQ can be found. To be honest the rest of the hospital is not much better either.
Why don`t you just attend Leeds hospital & save the staff your `forceful` attitude? You sound like a dream of a patient.
[quote][p][bold]mortandindi[/bold] wrote: This isn't news... the A&E department has been a disaster for years. The doctors on duty are a total liability and should not be in the job at all. The clerical staff have no sense of urgency and only after having to get forceful do they ever do anything. I have personally been mis-diagnosed four times in York A&E in the last eight years!! the worst being told I had a torn hamstring only to find out nearly six months later that I have broken my leg in two places. Close it down until new staff with some sort of IQ can be found. To be honest the rest of the hospital is not much better either.[/p][/quote]Why don`t you just attend Leeds hospital & save the staff your `forceful` attitude? You sound like a dream of a patient. inthesticks

6:55pm Tue 7 Jan 14

AntMcM says...

How can they run an A&E department without a consultant there overnight? Answer: they can't, it's a disastrous department which regularly makes serious life-threatening mistakes. In the meantime the administrators' salaries continue to increase...
How can they run an A&E department without a consultant there overnight? Answer: they can't, it's a disastrous department which regularly makes serious life-threatening mistakes. In the meantime the administrators' salaries continue to increase... AntMcM

11:07pm Wed 8 Jan 14

hca2013 says...

I hate when you get story's like this as their so one sided. Its not just a and e in york its a nationwide problem and we all focus on the negatives and yet you never mention all the hard work that happens everyday , so what if waiting times are longer, take the time to think off the poor person who is not waiting and is serious york hospital covers such a large area and when smaller hospitals are shut weekends and out of hours doctors sometimes send people to a and e anyway. Why don't people volunteer and give up their time to campaign to improve it instead of just criticizing it.
I hate when you get story's like this as their so one sided. Its not just a and e in york its a nationwide problem and we all focus on the negatives and yet you never mention all the hard work that happens everyday , so what if waiting times are longer, take the time to think off the poor person who is not waiting and is serious york hospital covers such a large area and when smaller hospitals are shut weekends and out of hours doctors sometimes send people to a and e anyway. Why don't people volunteer and give up their time to campaign to improve it instead of just criticizing it. hca2013

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