City is among worst places for hospital ‘bed blocking’

York Press: . .

YORK has been named as one of the worst places in England for hospital beds being blocked because of a lack of community care facilities.

NHS England figures for October showed patients were being kept in hospital despite being well enough to be discharged because there was no care available nearer their home. It meant 1,088 “lost bed days” within City of York Council’s boundaries that month, including 428 for acute care.

The study showed 757 “delayed days” were attributable to social care, 297 to the NHS and 34 to both areas.

In most other local authority areas, the majority of delays were due to NHS issues rather than social care.

The figures provided to NHS England by York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and the Leeds and York Mental Health Foundation Trust said that, for every 100,000 members of the population aged 18 or over, there were 461.6 days of delayed care transfers on average. A hospital spokeswoman said: “Clearly, we would like to see fewer patients delayed in hospital beds, whatever the reason, and we are working hard with our commissioners, local authorities and other providers to improve the way all parts of the system operate and to work towards ensuring only those patients who need acute care are in hospital.

“We need to make sure patients who are fit to leave hospital are discharged safely and able to recover in the right place with the right support. However, no patient should experience unnecessary delays.”

City of York Council said recent Audit Commission figures were “at odds” with NHS England’s statistics and it wanted to clarify this. Council leader Coun James Alexander said demand for social care was growing, care needs were becoming more complex, and the historic debt of the region’s former primary care trust had been a key factor.

“It is clear there has been a long-running, systemic problem going back ten years, and one consequence of this was that £1 million of reablement funding has not reached the council from the primary care trust,” he said.

“The problem has not been helped by the reorganisation of the NHS, and both of York’s MPs and the council have repeatedly raised funding issues with ministers. We have already begun to address these issues through a radical redesign and integration of services led by a new director of health and wellbeing. I have asked for an urgent review and I am expecting improvements within six months.”

Comments (3)

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8:00pm Wed 11 Dec 13

acomblass says...

I look forward to Cllr Fraser asking questions of his colleagues on this issue
I look forward to Cllr Fraser asking questions of his colleagues on this issue acomblass

9:58pm Wed 11 Dec 13

only human says...

quel surprise ! not
Cost cutting to elderly services is the main cause of this crisis and its so sad that the victims very ofeten dont make it back home.
Its a well known fact that elderly people are more suceptible to infections and falls whilst in hospital.
The sad fact is that such infections and falls can and do kill.
The other fact i would like to put across is that many so called bed blockers who happen to be elderly actually get admitted to hospital as they often live alone and have lack of family and friends in a lot of cases.
It may be that they have a fall in their home and possibly are fortunate enough to have an intercom system or telecare in place to summon help.
Paramedics often attend and air on the side of caution and take them to hospital to be checked over.
Once in the cubicles and hospital they can quickly become confused and disoriented and unable to get their self understood effectively.
They are often then sent up to an elderly ward pending further checks and assessment and this is where they end up in the backed up clogged up social care system.
It is extremely difficult to secure a quick home/care needs assessment in York.
There is always a massive backlog of cases and with peoples needs changing constantly there just arent enough care managers and home support services available.
The care budget has been slashed over recent years and nobody wants to pick the tab up any more for an ageing population.
Its a shambles and a real infringement of human rights to leave any human incarcerated in an almost institutionalised setting for months on end just through a lack of resources.
quel surprise ! not Cost cutting to elderly services is the main cause of this crisis and its so sad that the victims very ofeten dont make it back home. Its a well known fact that elderly people are more suceptible to infections and falls whilst in hospital. The sad fact is that such infections and falls can and do kill. The other fact i would like to put across is that many so called bed blockers who happen to be elderly actually get admitted to hospital as they often live alone and have lack of family and friends in a lot of cases. It may be that they have a fall in their home and possibly are fortunate enough to have an intercom system or telecare in place to summon help. Paramedics often attend and air on the side of caution and take them to hospital to be checked over. Once in the cubicles and hospital they can quickly become confused and disoriented and unable to get their self understood effectively. They are often then sent up to an elderly ward pending further checks and assessment and this is where they end up in the backed up clogged up social care system. It is extremely difficult to secure a quick home/care needs assessment in York. There is always a massive backlog of cases and with peoples needs changing constantly there just arent enough care managers and home support services available. The care budget has been slashed over recent years and nobody wants to pick the tab up any more for an ageing population. Its a shambles and a real infringement of human rights to leave any human incarcerated in an almost institutionalised setting for months on end just through a lack of resources. only human

11:21pm Thu 12 Dec 13

topumpire1 says...

only human wrote:
quel surprise ! not
Cost cutting to elderly services is the main cause of this crisis and its so sad that the victims very ofeten dont make it back home.
Its a well known fact that elderly people are more suceptible to infections and falls whilst in hospital.
The sad fact is that such infections and falls can and do kill.
The other fact i would like to put across is that many so called bed blockers who happen to be elderly actually get admitted to hospital as they often live alone and have lack of family and friends in a lot of cases.
It may be that they have a fall in their home and possibly are fortunate enough to have an intercom system or telecare in place to summon help.
Paramedics often attend and air on the side of caution and take them to hospital to be checked over.
Once in the cubicles and hospital they can quickly become confused and disoriented and unable to get their self understood effectively.
They are often then sent up to an elderly ward pending further checks and assessment and this is where they end up in the backed up clogged up social care system.
It is extremely difficult to secure a quick home/care needs assessment in York.
There is always a massive backlog of cases and with peoples needs changing constantly there just arent enough care managers and home support services available.
The care budget has been slashed over recent years and nobody wants to pick the tab up any more for an ageing population.
Its a shambles and a real infringement of human rights to leave any human incarcerated in an almost institutionalised setting for months on end just through a lack of resources.
And this will only get worse when councils (like the county) cut bus subsidies, so the sick have to get GPs to visit & HAVE to be admitted to hospital, as there is not enough council funded care!
NHS England must not just look at their money pot, but the whole pub lic (Taxes) money lake when considering cuts or otherwise
[quote][p][bold]only human[/bold] wrote: quel surprise ! not Cost cutting to elderly services is the main cause of this crisis and its so sad that the victims very ofeten dont make it back home. Its a well known fact that elderly people are more suceptible to infections and falls whilst in hospital. The sad fact is that such infections and falls can and do kill. The other fact i would like to put across is that many so called bed blockers who happen to be elderly actually get admitted to hospital as they often live alone and have lack of family and friends in a lot of cases. It may be that they have a fall in their home and possibly are fortunate enough to have an intercom system or telecare in place to summon help. Paramedics often attend and air on the side of caution and take them to hospital to be checked over. Once in the cubicles and hospital they can quickly become confused and disoriented and unable to get their self understood effectively. They are often then sent up to an elderly ward pending further checks and assessment and this is where they end up in the backed up clogged up social care system. It is extremely difficult to secure a quick home/care needs assessment in York. There is always a massive backlog of cases and with peoples needs changing constantly there just arent enough care managers and home support services available. The care budget has been slashed over recent years and nobody wants to pick the tab up any more for an ageing population. Its a shambles and a real infringement of human rights to leave any human incarcerated in an almost institutionalised setting for months on end just through a lack of resources.[/p][/quote]And this will only get worse when councils (like the county) cut bus subsidies, so the sick have to get GPs to visit & HAVE to be admitted to hospital, as there is not enough council funded care! NHS England must not just look at their money pot, but the whole pub lic (Taxes) money lake when considering cuts or otherwise topumpire1

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