Social care users slam new system

York Press: David Smith, former head of York Mind and now director of development at The Retreat, who spoke to City of York council’s health scrutiny committee David Smith, former head of York Mind and now director of development at The Retreat, who spoke to City of York council’s health scrutiny committee

PEOPLE who use social care services in York face being left isolated and insufficiently supported, a survey has found.

Findings were revealed in a report to City of York Council’s health scrutiny committee, which met to discuss findings from an ongoing study on the administration of personalised budget plans, which started in May 2012.

Budgets tailored to the individual are available to people with continuing health care needs from the Department of Health, and the council, and workshops were carried out with 34 service users to discuss what was and was not working.

The report showed that negative comments were more common than praise for the system.

Service users said they felt “feelings of social isolation, not helped by ‘poor’ transport links”, and not enough was done by community networks.

Others said getting support was “frustrating and challenging”, with “too much pressure on care managers to work quickly rather than well”.

The most critical comment on support staff care was: “Washed... Fed... You’re done”, and more felt financial services were not working well than felt they were working, with debts not taken into account, and the service and contracts being too inflexible.

David Smith, director of development at The Retreat, told the meeting: “Mental health is one of the more challenging areas in terms of personalisation.

“It’s given us better understanding of what the authorities understand about personalisation, but we’ve not managed to address the issue of why it’s not working.”

The workshops concluded there was a need for more investment and training for support staff, a more open assessment process that would be easier for users to understand, and “that care agencies should be given contracts based on quality care, not just the cheapest”.

The meeting said further lessons would be learned from the report, and research would continue to best tackle the concerns of service users.

Comments (2)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:49am Tue 3 Dec 13

smiler45 says...

Nothing in this article is a surprise to me, Community care is just a production line and all about money, it certainly isn't about providing the best quality of care for our elderly and vulnerable in society. Care agencies should be abolished!
Nothing in this article is a surprise to me, Community care is just a production line and all about money, it certainly isn't about providing the best quality of care for our elderly and vulnerable in society. Care agencies should be abolished! smiler45

5:52pm Tue 3 Dec 13

only human says...

I can fully understand the term "washed dressed , done " because thats exactly what the care in the individuals home is like now.
We have stripped the care budget back to the absolute bare bones for the most vulnerable of our elderly and disbled neighbours.
Having had a number of years working within the community care sector i can see first hand the detrimental effect that cutback in recent years have had to peoples lives.
Many people are slotted into 15 minute care calls and most common is the 4 calls per day.15 mins max.
First call.up washed dressed meds and fed.left in chair or bed.
Second call around lunchtime.Meds Micromeal or snack,drink and left in chair or bed.15 mins max.pad change or commoded
Third call ,teaplate,drink,meds
.left in chair or bed.,,pad change or commoded.
Fourth call around 6-8pm typically.undress and get into nightclothes ,clean pad or commoded.help into bed .
The lucky ones are those who are awarded a night call for toileting purposes but usually these are the extreme dementia cases or disabled rather than just elderly with poor mobility because these ones are just padded up for an average 12 hour night.
There is rarely time factored into any call time to interact and chat with customers.
For many of these people the carers are the only human contact they receive day to day.
Even in the sheltered housing facilities services outside of allocated or pre assessed/booked care calls are no longer there.
Supporting people has gone into reverse with the removal of the extra care service and the re instatement of the old style wardens who are more geared towards maintaining there paymasters building than taking an caring interest in their residents.
In these places when a resident becomes "a problem " or "nuisance " as they need extra care and keep summoning help on the intercom.The wardens now refer them on and that can mean moving people from their own homes and forcing into residential "institutional " style settings or even more extreme nursing homes.
There is little difference now between social and private sheltered housing, and these poor old folk who have paid into the state system for decades are now being let down significantly as privatisation and care for profit becomes the norm.
Funny enough though the mental health side of the care sector does seem to have faired better and many people seem to have support workers galore .It seems ironic that we can supply a support worker to take someone shopping twice a week or accompany to the cinema/theatre etc etc yet we cant seem to ensure the real housebound elderly have anyone to accompany them to appoinments essential to their health like dentists for good fitting dentures or regular eye tests or even just a trip to the local church or cafe.The whole system is a shambles and i dread to think what service awaits many of us whn our turn comes around,because it will.
I can fully understand the term "washed dressed , done " because thats exactly what the care in the individuals home is like now. We have stripped the care budget back to the absolute bare bones for the most vulnerable of our elderly and disbled neighbours. Having had a number of years working within the community care sector i can see first hand the detrimental effect that cutback in recent years have had to peoples lives. Many people are slotted into 15 minute care calls and most common is the 4 calls per day.15 mins max. First call.up washed dressed meds and fed.left in chair or bed. Second call around lunchtime.Meds Micromeal or snack,drink and left in chair or bed.15 mins max.pad change or commoded Third call ,teaplate,drink,meds .left in chair or bed.,,pad change or commoded. Fourth call around 6-8pm typically.undress and get into nightclothes ,clean pad or commoded.help into bed . The lucky ones are those who are awarded a night call for toileting purposes but usually these are the extreme dementia cases or disabled rather than just elderly with poor mobility because these ones are just padded up for an average 12 hour night. There is rarely time factored into any call time to interact and chat with customers. For many of these people the carers are the only human contact they receive day to day. Even in the sheltered housing facilities services outside of allocated or pre assessed/booked care calls are no longer there. Supporting people has gone into reverse with the removal of the extra care service and the re instatement of the old style wardens who are more geared towards maintaining there paymasters building than taking an caring interest in their residents. In these places when a resident becomes "a problem " or "nuisance " as they need extra care and keep summoning help on the intercom.The wardens now refer them on and that can mean moving people from their own homes and forcing into residential "institutional " style settings or even more extreme nursing homes. There is little difference now between social and private sheltered housing, and these poor old folk who have paid into the state system for decades are now being let down significantly as privatisation and care for profit becomes the norm. Funny enough though the mental health side of the care sector does seem to have faired better and many people seem to have support workers galore .It seems ironic that we can supply a support worker to take someone shopping twice a week or accompany to the cinema/theatre etc etc yet we cant seem to ensure the real housebound elderly have anyone to accompany them to appoinments essential to their health like dentists for good fitting dentures or regular eye tests or even just a trip to the local church or cafe.The whole system is a shambles and i dread to think what service awaits many of us whn our turn comes around,because it will. only human

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree