York health chiefs accused of putting lives of diabetic patients at risk

York Press: York Central MP Hugh Bayley York Central MP Hugh Bayley

HEALTH chiefs have been accused of putting the lives of thousands of diabetic patients at risk as they try to slash their debts.

Diabetes UK’s York and District Voluntary Group says debts inherited by the Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group are having an enormously detrimental effect on all diabetic patients attending York Hospital.

Spokesman Howard Steel said in a letter to the group that a squeeze on funding caused by debts left by its predecessor, the former primary care trust, appeared to be putting York patients at an unfair disadvantage compared with others elsewhere in the country.

In the old trust area, there were about 33,000 people diagnosed with diabetes and an estimated 16,000 others who had it without knowing.

Mr Steel said members were horrified at the speed with which hospital consultants had been asked to discharge large numbers of diabetic patients back into the care of the community, before GPs had had time to prepare for a huge influx of patients.

“Many of these people need to see specialists in order to ensure that small changes in their health will not lead to life-threatening changes in their conditions,” he said. “This action is both unfair on the GPs and unsafe for the patients.”

He feared many diabetes patients were unaware of the changes and that there could be a loss of expertise at the diabetes centre at York Hospital.

“People who are worried about their diabetes will no longer be able to phone and ask to see someone at the centre but will have to see their GP first and then wait for an appointment to become available. Often, such a delay can cause life-threatening complications to worsen.”

York Central MP Hugh Bayley said York patients should get the same standard of care as those elsewhere under a national health service.

“If the Government won’t set national standards for care, Parliament should pass a law to make them do it,” he said, adding that he would re-introduce his previous NHS Right to Care Bill to re-start a debate in the Commons.

A CCG spokeswoman said it had worked closely with York Hospital’s clinical leads and consultants, who recognised the urgency of a service review.

“After much consideration and the evaluation of patients’ needs, York Hospital took the decision to begin the discharge of patients,” she said.

“After a thorough study of performance, the hospital became aware of the fact that annual out-patient reviews often prevented the hospital from providing appointments for patients with more complex needs. Until recently, there was a high level of duplication. Many patients were already receiving annual reviews through their practice.”

She said patients could be assured their GP could provide the same levels of quality care and monitoring of their condition as they would get in a hospital setting.

Their care would be equally as effective as their previous hospital healthcare offer, along with the added benefit of being more efficient; both for the patient’s time and on local healthcare resources.

Comments (7)

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10:53am Fri 16 Aug 13

inthesticks says...

I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?
I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that? inthesticks

11:26am Fri 16 Aug 13

Just zis guy, you know? says...

inthesticks wrote:
I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?
I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in:

In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans)

There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate.

For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.
[quote][p][bold]inthesticks[/bold] wrote: I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?[/p][/quote]I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in: In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans) There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate. For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent. Just zis guy, you know?

11:48am Fri 16 Aug 13

perplexed says...

Just zis guy, you know? wrote:
inthesticks wrote:
I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?
I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in:

In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans)

There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate.

For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.
i wasn't aware that diabetes patients could self refer to Hospital ? Surely those patients who have previously been treated by Hospital were referred by their GP's in their first place because they needed additional input they themselves could not offer. Therefore either the Hospital consultants have been keeping patients on their books who could have reasonably been discharged back to their GP's sooner or this is yet another cost cutting measure at the expense of patient care. Interestingly, another CCG is about to implement a scheme whereby GPs will receive a one-off fee of £30 per patient for carrying out a review of all patients being managed by the diabetes in Hospital in order to have them
discharged and managed in primary care.

It is good to know that some diabetes suffers have been managed successfully in the community by GP's but equally it is alarming to learn that others who were sent to Hospital by the same GP's are now being discharged without any consultation whatsoever!
[quote][p][bold]Just zis guy, you know?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]inthesticks[/bold] wrote: I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?[/p][/quote]I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in: In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans) There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate. For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.[/p][/quote]i wasn't aware that diabetes patients could self refer to Hospital ? Surely those patients who have previously been treated by Hospital were referred by their GP's in their first place because they needed additional input they themselves could not offer. Therefore either the Hospital consultants have been keeping patients on their books who could have reasonably been discharged back to their GP's sooner or this is yet another cost cutting measure at the expense of patient care. Interestingly, another CCG is about to implement a scheme whereby GPs will receive a one-off fee of £30 per patient for carrying out a review of all patients being managed by the diabetes in Hospital in order to have them discharged and managed in primary care. It is good to know that some diabetes suffers have been managed successfully in the community by GP's but equally it is alarming to learn that others who were sent to Hospital by the same GP's are now being discharged without any consultation whatsoever! perplexed

5:14pm Fri 16 Aug 13

TheTruthHurts says...

Just zis guy, you know? wrote:
inthesticks wrote:
I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?
I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in:

In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans)

There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate.

For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.
Type 2 Diabetes is a whole different ball game completely to Type 1. So much so that they shouldnt really be compared
[quote][p][bold]Just zis guy, you know?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]inthesticks[/bold] wrote: I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?[/p][/quote]I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in: In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans) There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate. For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.[/p][/quote]Type 2 Diabetes is a whole different ball game completely to Type 1. So much so that they shouldnt really be compared TheTruthHurts

6:24pm Fri 16 Aug 13

big boy york says...

unfortunatly this is the state of the nhs today due to government incompetence, this is not only happening with diabetes, a friend of mines son has cerebral palsy & needs splints for his legs, his parents from surrey have recently been told that due to cutbacks the orthotic dept there will no longer be able to provide splints or lycra bandages for there child unless they pay for them, shame on this government for making the nhs a 3rd world organisation,
unfortunatly this is the state of the nhs today due to government incompetence, this is not only happening with diabetes, a friend of mines son has cerebral palsy & needs splints for his legs, his parents from surrey have recently been told that due to cutbacks the orthotic dept there will no longer be able to provide splints or lycra bandages for there child unless they pay for them, shame on this government for making the nhs a 3rd world organisation, big boy york

9:03pm Fri 16 Aug 13

Just zis guy, you know? says...

TheTruthHurts wrote:
Just zis guy, you know? wrote:
inthesticks wrote:
I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?
I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in:

In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans)

There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate.

For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.
Type 2 Diabetes is a whole different ball game completely to Type 1. So much so that they shouldnt really be compared
Fair point - Type 1 is a different ball game entirely, but even so in a lot of cases treatment can be carried out at the 'community' level (my father is late-onset Type 1 so I've seen at first hand how his treatment etc. is handled)
[quote][p][bold]TheTruthHurts[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Just zis guy, you know?[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]inthesticks[/bold] wrote: I don`t see an issue with having more treatments at local GP`s surgeries. Surely it`s easier for people to attend their local GP, who should have knowledge of diabetes as well as other common diseases. Isn`t the majority of treatment for diabetes medicinal and giving information about diet? Do you need a hospital visit for that?[/p][/quote]I'll ignore the fact that Bayley is probably indulging in a bit of political posturing and soundbite generation, and put my two-bobsworth in: In my particular situation, the answer is 'no' - in fact, I can't remember the last time I had to visit the hospital for diabetes-related treatment. Everything, including retinopathy scans and blood tests, is handled either by my GP (in the case of medication reviews, tests etc.) or at one of the local surgeries (in the case of retinopathy scans) There will undoubtedly be cases where treatment at the hospital is required (eg. liver/kidney related issues, 'training' in the administration of insulin etc.) but its by no means necessary. In my opinion, that is - I'm a type 2 diabetic and most of my treatment is indeed related to administration of appropriate medication, for which a hospital appointment would be wholly inappropriate. For what its worth, the standard of care I've had since being diagnosed over 10 years ago has been nothing short of excellent.[/p][/quote]Type 2 Diabetes is a whole different ball game completely to Type 1. So much so that they shouldnt really be compared[/p][/quote]Fair point - Type 1 is a different ball game entirely, but even so in a lot of cases treatment can be carried out at the 'community' level (my father is late-onset Type 1 so I've seen at first hand how his treatment etc. is handled) Just zis guy, you know?

9:07pm Fri 16 Aug 13

Just zis guy, you know? says...

big boy york wrote:
unfortunatly this is the state of the nhs today due to government incompetence, this is not only happening with diabetes, a friend of mines son has cerebral palsy & needs splints for his legs, his parents from surrey have recently been told that due to cutbacks the orthotic dept there will no longer be able to provide splints or lycra bandages for there child unless they pay for them, shame on this government for making the nhs a 3rd world organisation,
Don't worry, there'll be nice cushy directorships for Call Me Dave and his cronies once they've finished riding the political gravy train.

We're all in this together, remember.
[quote][p][bold]big boy york[/bold] wrote: unfortunatly this is the state of the nhs today due to government incompetence, this is not only happening with diabetes, a friend of mines son has cerebral palsy & needs splints for his legs, his parents from surrey have recently been told that due to cutbacks the orthotic dept there will no longer be able to provide splints or lycra bandages for there child unless they pay for them, shame on this government for making the nhs a 3rd world organisation,[/p][/quote]Don't worry, there'll be nice cushy directorships for Call Me Dave and his cronies once they've finished riding the political gravy train. We're all in this together, remember. Just zis guy, you know?

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