North Yorkshire’s slavery links documented online

North Yorkshire’s links to the slave trade have been documented as part of a free online encyclopaedia project.

Records were kept of people who claimed for compensation in the years following the abolition of the slave trade in 1807.

Those archives, never systematically studied before, throw new light on how the slavery business contributed to Britain becoming the first industrial nation and its connections with some stately homes including Harewood House, near Harrogate, and Duncombe Park, near Helmsley.

The encyclopaedia at www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs records the 46,000 claims made for compensation, with information on the 3,000 or so Britons who lived in Britain but had property in people.

Professor Catherine Hall, from University College London, one of those behind the archive, told a national newspaper the aim was not to name and shame by focusing on slave owners.

“We seek to undo the forgetting: to re-remember and to recognise the ways in which the fruits of slavery are part of our collective history – embedded in our country and town houses, the philanthropic institutions, the art collections, the merchant banks and legal firms, the railways, and the ways we continue to think about race.”

Records show that during the 1830s Henry Lascelles, the Earl of Harewood, successfully claimed tens of thousands of pounds. The Lascelles family who own Harewood House had interests in 47 sugar plantations and owned thousands of slaves in Barbados and across the West Indies. They weren’t unique – most merchants of the period were involved in the slave trade.

The current Earl of Harewood, David Lascelles, said: “The source of the wealth that built Harewood is historical fact. There is nothing anyone can do to change the past, however appalling or regrettable that past might be. What we have tried to do here is engage with that legacy in a positive way.”

Records also show an unsuccessful claim for £1,844 made in 1837 on behalf of Charles, Baron Feversham of Duncombe Park for 111 slaves on the Caribbean island of Nevis. No one was available to comment when The Press contacted Duncombe Park.

Comments (7)

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8:02am Thu 28 Feb 13

chrisatyork says...

slavery= iss cleaners on the railway
slavery= iss cleaners on the railway chrisatyork

8:43am Thu 28 Feb 13

coldcoffee says...

'No one from the early nineteenth century was available to comment when The Press contacted Duncombe Park'.
'No one from the early nineteenth century was available to comment when The Press contacted Duncombe Park'. coldcoffee

9:22am Thu 28 Feb 13

Garrowby Turnoff says...

William Wilberforce from Hull and educated at Pocklington School, was the man who introduced the Bill to abolish slavery.

In 2004 he was named the 'Greatest ever Yorkshire Man' because of his driving force behind the abolition of the slave trade in Britain.

This somewhat redresses the shameful past other Yorkshiremen played in the slave trade.
William Wilberforce from Hull and educated at Pocklington School, was the man who introduced the Bill to abolish slavery. In 2004 he was named the 'Greatest ever Yorkshire Man' because of his driving force behind the abolition of the slave trade in Britain. This somewhat redresses the shameful past other Yorkshiremen played in the slave trade. Garrowby Turnoff

9:27am Thu 28 Feb 13

Kevin Turvey says...

Slavery was a terrible thing and a lot of people are still living from the profits. ie. old English families/landowners that have amassed huge property portfolios from other peoples misery.


‘chrisatyork says... 8:02am Thu 28 Feb 13
slavery= iss cleaners on the railway’

slavery
noun
1.
the condition of a slave; bondage.
2.
the keeping of slaves as a practice or institution.
3.
a state of subjection like that of a slave: He was kept in slavery by drugs.
4.
severe toil; drudgery.

However, ISS cleaners get paid, no matter how poorly and it’s their choice to turn up to work or work elsewhere!

Slaves do not and are/were at risk of being beaten and are owned by their master.

A huge difference, do not confuse a poorly paid optional job to slavery!

Think of all the tax free not talked about bonuses the ISS cleaners get.. all the choice pickings of the ‘lost property’ before it is ‘handed in’, like ipods/phones etc that are sold.

I know it happens as I know of somebody that has done it!

Try to get a grip on reality.
Slavery was a terrible thing and a lot of people are still living from the profits. ie. old English families/landowners that have amassed huge property portfolios from other peoples misery. ‘chrisatyork says... 8:02am Thu 28 Feb 13 slavery= iss cleaners on the railway’ slavery noun 1. the condition of a slave; bondage. 2. the keeping of slaves as a practice or institution. 3. a state of subjection like that of a slave: He was kept in slavery by drugs. 4. severe toil; drudgery. However, ISS cleaners get paid, no matter how poorly and it’s their choice to turn up to work or work elsewhere! Slaves do not and are/were at risk of being beaten and are owned by their master. A huge difference, do not confuse a poorly paid optional job to slavery! Think of all the tax free not talked about bonuses the ISS cleaners get.. all the choice pickings of the ‘lost property’ before it is ‘handed in’, like ipods/phones etc that are sold. I know it happens as I know of somebody that has done it! Try to get a grip on reality. Kevin Turvey

9:54am Thu 28 Feb 13

capt spaulding says...

I recently visited the Maritime Museam at Docklands where there is extensive information about the slave trade.

I was amazed to see how much a slave cost in the early 1800s £80.00.
A considerable major investment at that time.
I am wondering how much that would be in todays money ?
I recently visited the Maritime Museam at Docklands where there is extensive information about the slave trade. I was amazed to see how much a slave cost in the early 1800s £80.00. A considerable major investment at that time. I am wondering how much that would be in todays money ? capt spaulding

1:31pm Thu 28 Feb 13

Bucktrout says...

capt spaulding wrote:
I recently visited the Maritime Museam at Docklands where there is extensive information about the slave trade. I was amazed to see how much a slave cost in the early 1800s £80.00. A considerable major investment at that time. I am wondering how much that would be in todays money ?
To give you some idea, the price in 1900 (according to http://www.thisismon
ey.co.uk/money/bills
/article-1633409/His
toric-inflation-calc
ulator-value-money-c
hanged-1900.html) would be approximately £8,022.

Go back another hundred years and I would dread to think!
[quote][p][bold]capt spaulding[/bold] wrote: I recently visited the Maritime Museam at Docklands where there is extensive information about the slave trade. I was amazed to see how much a slave cost in the early 1800s £80.00. A considerable major investment at that time. I am wondering how much that would be in todays money ?[/p][/quote]To give you some idea, the price in 1900 (according to http://www.thisismon ey.co.uk/money/bills /article-1633409/His toric-inflation-calc ulator-value-money-c hanged-1900.html) would be approximately £8,022. Go back another hundred years and I would dread to think! Bucktrout

4:21pm Thu 28 Feb 13

again says...

capt spaulding wrote:
I recently visited the Maritime Museam at Docklands where there is extensive information about the slave trade.

I was amazed to see how much a slave cost in the early 1800s £80.00.
A considerable major investment at that time.
I am wondering how much that would be in todays money ?
I'd imagine quite a large proportion of the sum would be needed to cover transportation costs and the fact that for every slave who survived the journey rather a lot didn't.
[quote][p][bold]capt spaulding[/bold] wrote: I recently visited the Maritime Museam at Docklands where there is extensive information about the slave trade. I was amazed to see how much a slave cost in the early 1800s £80.00. A considerable major investment at that time. I am wondering how much that would be in todays money ?[/p][/quote]I'd imagine quite a large proportion of the sum would be needed to cover transportation costs and the fact that for every slave who survived the journey rather a lot didn't. again

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