A19 re-opens as floodwaters subside

A MAJOR route into York has re-opened after floodwaters subsided.

The A19 at Fulford was closed just hours into the New Year yesterday when the River Ouse rose to 4.5 metres above normal summer levels, following heavy rain on New Year’s Eve.

Commuters heading into York this morning on their first day back at work after the festive break had to take alternative routes, such as the A1079 Hull Road, which became congested.

The river had subsided by this morning to 4.2 metres above normal, and will continue to fall slowly, according to the Environment Agency, and City of York Council removed barriers blocking the A19 at 10am.

Comments (3)

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4:12pm Wed 2 Jan 13

capt spaulding says...

This is why we really need a housing development right on the flood plain area. Makes obvious sense dunnit.
This is why we really need a housing development right on the flood plain area. Makes obvious sense dunnit. capt spaulding

7:42pm Wed 2 Jan 13

bob the builder says...

capt spaulding wrote:
This is why we really need a housing development right on the flood plain area. Makes obvious sense dunnit.
Locals won't buy them, a good proportion will be bought by housing associations whose problem tenants come from elsewhere (old College site - just look at the no. of 1 and 2 year old homes on the market now - can't sell them), so if it's cut off by floodwaters that'll do the rest of the city a favour.
[quote][p][bold]capt spaulding[/bold] wrote: This is why we really need a housing development right on the flood plain area. Makes obvious sense dunnit.[/p][/quote]Locals won't buy them, a good proportion will be bought by housing associations whose problem tenants come from elsewhere (old College site - just look at the no. of 1 and 2 year old homes on the market now - can't sell them), so if it's cut off by floodwaters that'll do the rest of the city a favour. bob the builder

12:27pm Thu 3 Jan 13

the original Homer says...

bob the builder wrote:
capt spaulding wrote: This is why we really need a housing development right on the flood plain area. Makes obvious sense dunnit.
Locals won't buy them, a good proportion will be bought by housing associations whose problem tenants come from elsewhere (old College site - just look at the no. of 1 and 2 year old homes on the market now - can't sell them), so if it's cut off by floodwaters that'll do the rest of the city a favour.
Maybe the council is hiding a closet Luddite?

Get rid of the unreliable automated flood alarm machines, and replace them with humans - The screams of the new tenants will give the established locals an early warning of the rising water. Much more reliable.
[quote][p][bold]bob the builder[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]capt spaulding[/bold] wrote: This is why we really need a housing development right on the flood plain area. Makes obvious sense dunnit.[/p][/quote]Locals won't buy them, a good proportion will be bought by housing associations whose problem tenants come from elsewhere (old College site - just look at the no. of 1 and 2 year old homes on the market now - can't sell them), so if it's cut off by floodwaters that'll do the rest of the city a favour.[/p][/quote]Maybe the council is hiding a closet Luddite? Get rid of the unreliable automated flood alarm machines, and replace them with humans - The screams of the new tenants will give the established locals an early warning of the rising water. Much more reliable. the original Homer

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