School buses to get seatbelts

Published in News

ALL school buses used by City of York Council could be fitted with seatbelts from next year.

Currently, just over half of the buses provided by the council do not have seatbelts because it is not a legal requirement.

Of 30 school buses which transporting 1,551 children to and from school, 14 of the buses – which together transport 758 children – do not have seat belts.

The council has now said it will look into making it compulsory when contracts go out to tender in early 2013.

Coun Janet Looker, cabinet member for education, children and young people’s services, said: “Every single bus that we commission that takes primary-school children to their schools are all well and truly fitted with seat belts.

“Obviously the issue around the older schoolchildren is slightly more complicated, but it is an issue we have very much in our minds.

“It’s one of the factors that we will be putting into our new contract system.”

York Outer MP Julian Sturdy, pictured, said he would be pushing for all buses to have seatbelts.

He said: “I’m pleased to see the council is taking action on this.

“We need to be looking to make this mandatory for all local authorities across the country for all school transport, not just primary schools.”

Hugh Bayley, MP for York Central, said he was in agreement with Mr Sturdy.

He said: “It’s safer to wear a seatbelt and school buses should be safe. I would support that there should be a change in the law nationally."

In Wales, seat belts will be compulsory on school buses from 2014 under legislation passed by the Welsh assembly.

Comments (4)

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11:20am Wed 14 Nov 12

Guy Fawkes says...

Good. The same should apply to all public transport vehicles, and standing in them should be outlawed.

I cannot understand why the wearing of seatbelts is mandatory in private cars and passenger aircraft; but not only is it not requried in buses and coaches, but most don't even have them. Those buses use the same road as private cars, and thus are subject to most of the same accident risks (though the drivers are probably trained to a higher standard than those of most private cars). So why is it acceptable to be exposed to those risks in someone else's bus, but not your own car?

There was a story over the weekend about a young woman who was killed when the car she was travelling in was hit by a drunk driver on the M62. She was not wearing a seat belt. The other occupants of the car, who were, survived. Last year several people were seriously injured when their National Express coach overturned on a slip road onto the M1. They weren't wearing belts, and the other passengers who were got out with cuts and bruises at most. A couple of months ago I was on a plane over the middle of the Atlantic that hit nasty turbulence. A passenger a few rows in front of me was knocked over and broke her arm. She was up and out of her seat, ignoring the 'fasten seat belt' sign. The report into the Selby train crash concluded that there probably would not have been any deaths if all the passengers had been seated and strapped in. The evidence is overwhelming that in many if not most accident scenarios, the use of a seatbelt means the difference between being unhurt and being killed.
Good. The same should apply to all public transport vehicles, and standing in them should be outlawed. I cannot understand why the wearing of seatbelts is mandatory in private cars and passenger aircraft; but not only is it not requried in buses and coaches, but most don't even have them. Those buses use the same road as private cars, and thus are subject to most of the same accident risks (though the drivers are probably trained to a higher standard than those of most private cars). So why is it acceptable to be exposed to those risks in someone else's bus, but not your own car? There was a story over the weekend about a young woman who was killed when the car she was travelling in was hit by a drunk driver on the M62. She was not wearing a seat belt. The other occupants of the car, who were, survived. Last year several people were seriously injured when their National Express coach overturned on a slip road onto the M1. They weren't wearing belts, and the other passengers who were got out with cuts and bruises at most. A couple of months ago I was on a plane over the middle of the Atlantic that hit nasty turbulence. A passenger a few rows in front of me was knocked over and broke her arm. She was up and out of her seat, ignoring the 'fasten seat belt' sign. The report into the Selby train crash concluded that there probably would not have been any deaths if all the passengers had been seated and strapped in. The evidence is overwhelming that in many if not most accident scenarios, the use of a seatbelt means the difference between being unhurt and being killed. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

4:50pm Wed 14 Nov 12

lowbeam says...

And just how are you going to enforce this? Who is going to tell a bus full of secondary school kids to 'belt up'?
And just how are you going to enforce this? Who is going to tell a bus full of secondary school kids to 'belt up'? lowbeam
  • Score: 0

2:50pm Thu 15 Nov 12

Guy Fawkes says...

And just how are you going to enforce this?


Exactly the same way that the current seatbelt law for private cars is enforced. If cars don't have working seatbelts fitted, they don't pass the MOT (apart from a tiny number of classic cars that never had them in the first place). I agree that it's impossible to prevent people from refusing to wear them, but that also applies to passengers in cars, and no-one is arguing that the inability to enforce the law on the minority who refuse to obey it means that the law should not exist.
[quote]And just how are you going to enforce this?[/quote] Exactly the same way that the current seatbelt law for private cars is enforced. If cars don't have working seatbelts fitted, they don't pass the MOT (apart from a tiny number of classic cars that never had them in the first place). I agree that it's impossible to prevent people from refusing to wear them, but that also applies to passengers in cars, and no-one is arguing that the inability to enforce the law on the minority who refuse to obey it means that the law should not exist. Guy Fawkes
  • Score: 0

9:21pm Tue 20 Nov 12

bicky98 says...

At Archbishop Holgates School York the 637 From the School to York Via Heworth gets packed out and lots of people standing and i think on any school bus people will just not wear them
At Archbishop Holgates School York the 637 From the School to York Via Heworth gets packed out and lots of people standing and i think on any school bus people will just not wear them bicky98
  • Score: 0

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