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Now showing at City Screen Picturehouse 13-17,Coney Street,York,Yorkshire YO1 9QL 0871 902 5726

  • A Bigger Splash
  • Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip
  • Casablanca
  • Chemsex
  • Dad's Army
  • Dad's Army (Parent And Baby Screening)
  • Dad's Army (Subtitled)
  • Gueros
  • I'll See You In My Dreams
  • Spotlight
  • Ted 16: Dream Opening Night
  • The Big Short
  • The Good Dinosaur
  • The Revenant

A Bigger Splash 4 stars

David Bowie-esque glam rock doyenne Marianne Lane is recuperating from surgery on her vocal chords. She has retreated to a villa on the rugged Sicilian island of Pantelleria with her boyfriend, documentary filmmaker Paul De Smedt. During a lazy afternoon on a secluded beach, Marianne receives a telephone call from her old flame, boorish record producer Harry Hawkes, who has arrived unexpectedly on the island. It's clear that Harry has arrived with an ulterior motive - to drive a wedge between the couple.

  • GenreAdaptation, Drama, Romance, Thriller
  • CastMatthias Schoenaerts, Dakota Johnson, Tilda Swinton, Ralph Fiennes.
  • DirectorLuca Guadagnino.
  • WriterDavid Kajganich.
  • CountryIta/Fr
  • Duration124 mins
  • Official sitewww.facebook.com/ABiggerSplash
  • Release12/02/2016 (selected cinemas)

Sun, sea, sex and skulduggery are the key ingredients of writer-director Luca Guadagnino's spicy cinematic cocktail, which elegantly updates the erotically charged 1969 thriller La Piscine from St Tropez to the rugged Sicilian island of Pantelleria.

Simmering sexual tensions of the original have been turned up to a furious boil in A Bigger Splash, which demands full-frontal nudity from almost the entire cast as the battle of the sexes claims at least one casualty. The striking backdrop of a volcanic Mediterranean island is an apt metaphor for the dormant desires of morally conflicted characters, who threaten to erupt under sustained provocation.

The four protagonists all seem capable of inflicting a fatal blow and breaking the heady spell of the untamed idyll. It's this air of uncertainty and impending doom which electrifies every frame of Guadagnino's stylistically specific vision.

Once again, the filmmaker collaborates with Oscar-winning British actress Tilda Swinton and gifts her a plum role as a David Bowie-esque glam rock doyenne called Marianne Lane, who is recuperating from surgery on her vocal chords.

Medically enforced silence forces Swinton to convey tortuous emotions through movement rather than words, allowing her co-stars to inflict damage with their well-placed verbal grenades. Marianne has retreated to a villa on Pantelleria with her boyfriend, documentary filmmaker Paul De Smedt (Matthias Schoenaerts), who has tamed her wild, drug-crazed excesses while shaking himself free of alcoholism.

During a lazy afternoon on a secluded beach, Marianne receives a telephone call from her old flame, boorish record producer Harry Hawkes (Ralph Fiennes), who has arrived unexpectedly on the island.

It's clear that Harry has arrived with an ulterior motive - to drive a wedge between the couple - and he has brought along his alluring teenage daughter, Penelope (Dakota Johnson), to distract Paul. "Underneath, she's a lovely bitch like her mother," jokes Harry.

Worming his way into the guest room at Marianne's secluded villa, Harry charms housekeeper Clara (Elena Bucci) and wallows in nostalgia to remind the hostess of happy times with him. Marianne remains by Paul's side until the two men finally lock horns.
"You have no idea of the stuff I got her off," rages Harry.
"I got her off you," counters Paul bluntly.

Sharing its title with a 1967 David Hockney painting, A Bigger Splash is energised by Fiennes' unflinching portrayal of an emotional wrecking ball. A centrepiece sequence of the actor gyrating wildly to The Rolling Stones' hit Emotional Rescue - an ironic musical choice - truly smacks our gobs.

Swinton is in imperious form and on-screen chemistry with Schoenaerts is molten like freshly spewed lava. Johnson is scorched by her co-stars, but shows greater depth than Fifty Shades Of Grey afforded her.

Writer-director Guadagnino repeatedly turns up the heat until we're itching for a cooling dip in the ominously blue waters of Marianne's pool.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016
Monday 15th February 2016
Tuesday 16th February 2016
Wednesday 17th February 2016
Thursday 18th February 2016

This film is also showing at:

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip 3 stars

Dave has been dating Samantha for several months. Alvin, Simon and Theodore would be delighted except Samantha's teenage son Miles bullies them mercilessly. The chipmunks discover an engagement ring in Dave's bag and realise that their pal is poised to go down on bended knee. This would be a disaster because the trio would have to suffer Miles for the rest of their lives, so they hatch a cunning plan to sabotage the relationship before Dave can produce the ring.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Animation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastJosh Green, Jason Lee, Matthew Gray Gubler, Justin Long, Jesse McCartney, Kimberly Williams-Paisley.
  • DirectorWalt Becker.
  • WriterAdam Sztykiel, Randi Mayem Singer.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration92 mins
  • Official site
  • Release12/02/2016

Love is in the air in the fourth instalment of the Alvin And The Chipmunks series... but not for long if the helium-voiced furballs get their way. Walt Becker's ramshackle road movie contrives a flimsy excuse for singing rodents Alvin, Simon and Theodore to want to sabotage the flourishing romance of their surrogate father.

Of course, the mischievous trio learn the error of their ways en route to a sentimental reconciliation that emphasises the importance of family over fame with all the subtlety of a swift kick to the sternum. Randi Mayem Singer and Adam Sztykiel's script trades in recycled humour and repeatedly makes pointless narrative detours to allow Alvin, Simon and Theodore to perform their high energy cover versions.

Thus the chipmunks swing their hips to Gloria Estefan's Conga at the mere mention of Miami and a detour to New Orleans provides the perfect excuse for a toe-tapping rendition of Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars' disco-flavoured floor filler Uptown 'Munk during Mardi Gras.

Dave (Jason Lee) has been dating Samantha (Kimberly Williams-Paisley) for several months and decides to introduce his sweetheart to his surrogate children. Alvin (voiced by Justin Long), Simon (Matthew Gray Gubler) and Theodore (Jesse McCartney) should be delighted, except Samantha's teenage son Miles (Josh Green) bullies them mercilessly when the parents' backs are turned.

The chipmunks discover an engagement ring and realise that Dave is poised to go down on bended knee to Samantha during a business trip to Miami to promote the album of superstar Ashley Grey (Bella Thorne).

Wedding bells toll disaster - the trio will be stuck with Miles - so the chipmunks hatch a cunning plan to sabotage the proposal. "People look out for themselves. It's what animals do," snarls Miles, who was abandoned at an early age by his no-good father.

He pledges support to Alvin, Simon and Theodore to prevent another man from hurting his mother. The quartet embarks on disaster-prone misadventures from Los Angeles to Miami including a tangle with a tenacious air marshal (Tony Hale).

Meanwhile, the feisty Chipettes - Brittany (Christina Applegate), Eleanor (Kaley Cuoco) and Jeanette (Anna Faris) - begin their stint as judges on TV talent show American Idol.

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip is cast in the mould of previous films, replete with bouts of chipmunk flatulence and slapstick humour. Hale's relentless air marshal is the butt of most of the jokes, including a face plant into a road sign during one madcap chase.

Lee is reduced to looking exasperated or proud as required. Polished digital effects seamlessly blend the rapping rodents with exaggerated real life, including one scene at a courthouse that comes surprisingly close to genuine heart-tugging emotion.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016
Monday 15th February 2016
Tuesday 16th February 2016
Wednesday 17th February 2016
Thursday 18th February 2016

This film is also showing at:

Casablanca 5 stars

Re-release of the classic 1942 wartime romance with one of cinema's most memorable farewells. American expatriate Rick Blaine runs a cafe in the centre of town, where Europeans often come to obtain exit visas to escape the Nazis. When old flame Ilsa and her husband, resistance leader Victor Laszlo, turn up in Casablanca, Rick faces an agonising moral dilemma: help the woman he loves and lose her forever, or betray her husband to the Germans.

  • GenreAdaptation, Classic, Drama, Romance
  • CastHumphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Peter Lorre, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Claude Rains.
  • DirectorMichael Curtiz.
  • WriterJulius J Epstein, Philip G Epstein, Howard Koch.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration102 mins
  • Official site
  • Release14/02/2007 (selected cinemas); 10/02/2012 (selected cinemas); 15/02/2015 (selected cinemas)

Re-release of Michael Curtiz's classic 1942 wartime romance with one of cinema's most memorable farewells. Humphrey Bogart stars as American expatriate Rick Blaine, who runs a cafe in the centre of town, where Europeans often come to obtain exit visas to escape the Nazis. When old flame Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) and her husband, resistance leader Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid), turn up in Casablanca, Rick faces an agonising moral dilemma: help the woman he loves and lose her forever, or betray her husband to the Germans.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016

Chemsex 3 stars

There has been a worrying rise in HIV diagnoses among London's gay community. Group sex parties, fuelled by crystal meth, GHB and mephedrone, are seen by some sexual health workers as a contributing factor to this alarming statistic. This documentary examines the trend for narcotic-fuelled, uninhibited gratification - known as chemsex - by talking candidly to some of the men who attend the parties and have been affected as a result.

  • GenreAdult, Documentary, Indie, LGBT
  • DirectorMax Gogarty, Will Fairman.
  • WriterMax Gogarty, Will Fairman.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration81 mins
  • Official sitewww.twitter.com/chemsexmovie
  • Release04/12/2015 (selected cinemas)

There has been a worrying rise in HIV diagnoses among London's gay community. Group sex parties, fuelled by crystal meth, GHB and mephedrone, are seen by some sexual health workers as a contributing factor to this alarming statistic. Documentary filmmakers William Fairman and Max Gogarty examine the trend for narcotic-fuelled, uninhibited gratification - known as chemsex - by talking candidly to some of the men who attend the parties and have been affected as a result. Containing graphic scenes of real sex and drug use, the film pulls no punches in its depiction of a hedonistic subculture that craves heightened pleasure but is sometimes blind to the devastating repercussions of its actions.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 15th February 2016

Dad's Army 2 stars

England, 1944. The Second World War is on a knife edge and in the cosy community of Walmington-on-Sea, blustering bank manager George Mainwaring proudly leads the local Home Guard. Colonel Theakes reveals that he intends to sort the military wheat from the chaff and "Walmington feels chaffy." Soon after, Mainwaring learns that a German spy has infiltrated the town and is transmitting secrets back to Berlin.

  • GenreComedy, Historical/Period, War
  • CastCatherine Zeta-Jones, Michael Gambon, Bill Nighy, Daniel Mays, Bill Paterson, Toby Jones, Tom Courtenay, Blake Harrison.
  • DirectorOliver Parker.
  • WriterHamish McColl.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration100 mins
  • Official site
  • Release05/02/2016

How do you improve on the perfection of Jimmy Perry and David Croft's sitcom Dad's Army, which began active service in 1968 and remains a jewel in the crown of the BBC comedy archives? You don't.

If you're director Oliver Parker and screenwriter Hamish McColl, you pepper a flimsy plot that would barely stretch to one TV episode let alone 100 minutes with the show's catchphrases and pray our abiding affection for the characters will compensate for long passages without a discernible punchline.

Original cast members Ian Lavender and Frank Williams are conscripted to cameo roles to heighten the whiff of nostalgia. Limp innuendo-laden banter about sausages barely merits a smirk, pratfalls are predictable and a terrific ensemble cast of gifted comic actors go on patrol without an arsenal of decent one-liners.

From uninspired beginning to muddled end, it's a cultural smash'n'grab that goes through the motions and will ultimately be remembered as a badly missed opportunity.

England, 1944. The Second World War is on a knife edge and in the cosy community of Walmington-on-Sea, blustering bank manager George Mainwaring (Toby Jones) proudly leads the local Home Guard. His hapless rank and file includes Sergeant Wilson (Bill Nighy), Lance Corporal Jones (Tom Courtenay) and Privates Frazer (Bill Paterson), Pike (Blake Harrison), Walker (Daniel Mays) and Godfrey (Michael Gambon), a mild-mannered soul who frequently drifts off into his own world.

The fate of the Home Guard hangs in the balance when Colonel Theakes (Mark Gatiss) reveals that he intends to sort the military wheat from the chaff and "Walmington feels chaffy." Soon after, Mainwaring learns that a German spy has infiltrated the town and is transmitting secrets back to Berlin.

This search for a traitor coincides with the arrival of glamorous magazine writer Rose Winters (Catherine Zeta-Jones), who intends to pen a flattering article about the heroics of the Home Guard. George is smitten and finds Rose most charming and agreeable.

"They said that about the Ripper," coldly retorts Mrs Mainwaring (Felicity Montagu), hard-nosed leader of Walmington-on-Sea's women's auxiliary army, which includes Pike's mother (Sarah Lancashire) and Walker's sweetheart Daphne (Emily Atack).

Dad's Army opens with a limp set piece involving a stand-off between the Home Guard and runaway livestock. "We're supposed to be locking horns with the Hun not Bertie the bull!" despairs one of the men, echoing our mounting frustration.

Jones lightens the darkening mood with a few moments of physical humour, including choking on a slice of cake, while Nighy relies on his usual snorts and tics for merriment. Montagu, Lancashire and co bring a diluted degree of girl power to proceedings that might be dismissed as tokenism without their characters' pivotal involvement in the hare-brained and lacklustre denouement.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016
Monday 15th February 2016
Tuesday 16th February 2016
Wednesday 17th February 2016
Thursday 18th February 2016

This film is also showing at:

Dad's Army (Parent And Baby Screening) 2 stars

England, 1944. The Second World War is on a knife edge and in the cosy community of Walmington-on-Sea, blustering bank manager George Mainwaring proudly leads the local Home Guard. Colonel Theakes reveals that he intends to sort the military wheat from the chaff and "Walmington feels chaffy." Soon after, Mainwaring learns that a German spy has infiltrated the town and is transmitting secrets back to Berlin.

  • GenreComedy, Family, Historical/Period, War
  • CastCatherine Zeta-Jones, Michael Gambon, Bill Nighy, Daniel Mays, Bill Paterson, Toby Jones, Tom Courtenay, Blake Harrison.
  • DirectorOliver Parker.
  • WriterHamish McColl.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration100 mins
  • Official site
  • Release05/02/2016

How do you improve on the perfection of Jimmy Perry and David Croft's sitcom Dad's Army, which began active service in 1968 and remains a jewel in the crown of the BBC comedy archives? You don't.

If you're director Oliver Parker and screenwriter Hamish McColl, you pepper a flimsy plot that would barely stretch to one TV episode let alone 100 minutes with the show's catchphrases and pray our abiding affection for the characters will compensate for long passages without a discernible punchline.

Original cast members Ian Lavender and Frank Williams are conscripted to cameo roles to heighten the whiff of nostalgia. Limp innuendo-laden banter about sausages barely merits a smirk, pratfalls are predictable and a terrific ensemble cast of gifted comic actors go on patrol without an arsenal of decent one-liners.

From uninspired beginning to muddled end, it's a cultural smash'n'grab that goes through the motions and will ultimately be remembered as a badly missed opportunity.

England, 1944. The Second World War is on a knife edge and in the cosy community of Walmington-on-Sea, blustering bank manager George Mainwaring (Toby Jones) proudly leads the local Home Guard. His hapless rank and file includes Sergeant Wilson (Bill Nighy), Lance Corporal Jones (Tom Courtenay) and Privates Frazer (Bill Paterson), Pike (Blake Harrison), Walker (Daniel Mays) and Godfrey (Michael Gambon), a mild-mannered soul who frequently drifts off into his own world.

The fate of the Home Guard hangs in the balance when Colonel Theakes (Mark Gatiss) reveals that he intends to sort the military wheat from the chaff and "Walmington feels chaffy." Soon after, Mainwaring learns that a German spy has infiltrated the town and is transmitting secrets back to Berlin.

This search for a traitor coincides with the arrival of glamorous magazine writer Rose Winters (Catherine Zeta-Jones), who intends to pen a flattering article about the heroics of the Home Guard. George is smitten and finds Rose most charming and agreeable.

"They said that about the Ripper," coldly retorts Mrs Mainwaring (Felicity Montagu), hard-nosed leader of Walmington-on-Sea's women's auxiliary army, which includes Pike's mother (Sarah Lancashire) and Walker's sweetheart Daphne (Emily Atack).

Dad's Army opens with a limp set piece involving a stand-off between the Home Guard and runaway livestock. "We're supposed to be locking horns with the Hun not Bertie the bull!" despairs one of the men, echoing our mounting frustration.

Jones lightens the darkening mood with a few moments of physical humour, including choking on a slice of cake, while Nighy relies on his usual snorts and tics for merriment. Montagu, Lancashire and co bring a diluted degree of girl power to proceedings that might be dismissed as tokenism without their characters' pivotal involvement in the hare-brained and lacklustre denouement.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 17th February 2016

Dad's Army (Subtitled) 2 stars

England, 1944. The Second World War is on a knife edge and in the cosy community of Walmington-on-Sea, blustering bank manager George Mainwaring proudly leads the local Home Guard. Colonel Theakes reveals that he intends to sort the military wheat from the chaff and "Walmington feels chaffy." Soon after, Mainwaring learns that a German spy has infiltrated the town and is transmitting secrets back to Berlin.

  • GenreComedy, Historical/Period, War
  • CastCatherine Zeta-Jones, Michael Gambon, Bill Nighy, Daniel Mays, Bill Paterson, Toby Jones, Tom Courtenay, Blake Harrison.
  • DirectorOliver Parker.
  • WriterHamish McColl.
  • CountryUK
  • Duration100 mins
  • Official site
  • Release05/02/2016

How do you improve on the perfection of Jimmy Perry and David Croft's sitcom Dad's Army, which began active service in 1968 and remains a jewel in the crown of the BBC comedy archives? You don't.

If you're director Oliver Parker and screenwriter Hamish McColl, you pepper a flimsy plot that would barely stretch to one TV episode let alone 100 minutes with the show's catchphrases and pray our abiding affection for the characters will compensate for long passages without a discernible punchline.

Original cast members Ian Lavender and Frank Williams are conscripted to cameo roles to heighten the whiff of nostalgia. Limp innuendo-laden banter about sausages barely merits a smirk, pratfalls are predictable and a terrific ensemble cast of gifted comic actors go on patrol without an arsenal of decent one-liners.

From uninspired beginning to muddled end, it's a cultural smash'n'grab that goes through the motions and will ultimately be remembered as a badly missed opportunity.

England, 1944. The Second World War is on a knife edge and in the cosy community of Walmington-on-Sea, blustering bank manager George Mainwaring (Toby Jones) proudly leads the local Home Guard. His hapless rank and file includes Sergeant Wilson (Bill Nighy), Lance Corporal Jones (Tom Courtenay) and Privates Frazer (Bill Paterson), Pike (Blake Harrison), Walker (Daniel Mays) and Godfrey (Michael Gambon), a mild-mannered soul who frequently drifts off into his own world.

The fate of the Home Guard hangs in the balance when Colonel Theakes (Mark Gatiss) reveals that he intends to sort the military wheat from the chaff and "Walmington feels chaffy." Soon after, Mainwaring learns that a German spy has infiltrated the town and is transmitting secrets back to Berlin.

This search for a traitor coincides with the arrival of glamorous magazine writer Rose Winters (Catherine Zeta-Jones), who intends to pen a flattering article about the heroics of the Home Guard. George is smitten and finds Rose most charming and agreeable.

"They said that about the Ripper," coldly retorts Mrs Mainwaring (Felicity Montagu), hard-nosed leader of Walmington-on-Sea's women's auxiliary army, which includes Pike's mother (Sarah Lancashire) and Walker's sweetheart Daphne (Emily Atack).

Dad's Army opens with a limp set piece involving a stand-off between the Home Guard and runaway livestock. "We're supposed to be locking horns with the Hun not Bertie the bull!" despairs one of the men, echoing our mounting frustration.

Jones lightens the darkening mood with a few moments of physical humour, including choking on a slice of cake, while Nighy relies on his usual snorts and tics for merriment. Montagu, Lancashire and co bring a diluted degree of girl power to proceedings that might be dismissed as tokenism without their characters' pivotal involvement in the hare-brained and lacklustre denouement.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 16th February 2016

Gueros 3 stars

Teenage rebel Tomas drives his mother to distraction by tormenting neighbours and passersby in their hometown of Veracruz. In desperation, the mother sends Tomas away to stay with his older brother Federico, who is a student in Mexico City. When Tomas arrives, he discovers that Federico is on strike along with the other students and is killing time with flat mate Santos in an apartment that doesn't have any electricity.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, World
  • CastSebastian Aguirre, Tenoch Huerta, Ilse Salas.
  • DirectorAlonso Ruiz Palacios.
  • WriterAlonso Ruiz Palacios, Gibran Portela.
  • CountryMex
  • Duration108 mins
  • Official site
  • Release20/11/2015 (selected cinemas)

Filmed in striking black and white, Alonso Ruizpalacios' offbeat comedy is a memorable coming-of-age story set in 1990s Mexico. Teenage rebel Tomas (Sebastian Aguirre) drives his mother to distraction by tormenting neighbours and passersby in their hometown of Veracruz. In desperation, the mother sends Tomas away to stay with his older brother Federico (Tenoch Huerta), who is a student in Mexico City. When Tomas arrives, he discovers that Federico is on strike along with the other students and is killing time with flat mate Santos (Leonardo Ortizgris) in an apartment that doesn't have any electricity. While Federico and Santos are content to wile away their days doing nothing, Tomas needs a focus for his energy and when the teenager learns that his Mexican rock'n'roll idol, Epigmeneo Cruz (Alfonso Charpener), is close to death, he persuades the slackers to join him on an odyssey to the hospital to pay their final respects.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016

I'll See You In My Dreams 3 stars

One-time singer and widow Carol Petersen strikes up a tender friendship with her younger pool man, Lloyd, to the delight of Carol's coterie of gal pals, Georgina, Rona and Sally. Carol is persuaded to try her hand at speed dating, which doesn't unfold as expected. However, she does accept an invitation of a date from Bill, who has a passion for Miles Davis. Meanwhile, Carol must rebuild bridges to her daughter Katherine, or risk losing her forever.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Indie, Romance
  • CastMartin Starr, Sam Elliott, Blythe Danner, Mary Kay Place, June Squibb, Rhea Perlman.
  • DirectorBrett Haley.
  • WriterMarc Basch, Brett Haley.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration94 mins
  • Official site
  • Release12/02/2016 (selected cinemas)

Blythe Danner delivers a tour-de-force lead performance in writer-director Brett Haley's assured comedy drama, co-written by Marc Basch, which proves you're never too old to gain a new lease on life. One-time singer and widow Carol Petersen (Danner) has a familiar and cosy day-to-day routine, which is temporarily thrown into disarray when she is compelled to put down her trusty pet dog. Soon after, a rat startles Carol in her home and she asks her pool man Lloyd (Martin Starr) for help to get rid of the vermin. Friendship blossoms with the much younger man, to the delight of Carol's coterie of gal pals, Georgina (June Squibb), Rona (Mary Kay Place) and Sally (Rhea Perlman). Carol is persuaded to try her hand at speed dating, which doesn't unfold as expected. However, she does accept an invitation of a date from Bill (Sam Elliott), who has a passion for Miles Davis. Meanwhile, Carol must rebuild bridges to her daughter Katherine (Malin Akerman), or risk losing her forever.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Thursday 18th February 2016

Spotlight 4 stars

Deputy Managing Editor Ben Bradlee Jr presides over the Boston Globe newsroom and has direct responsibility for the Spotlight team led by Walter "Robby" Robinson. Down in the basement, Robby and his colleagues Michael Rezendes, Sacha Pfeiffer and Matt Carroll are hard at work on a potentially explosive story. Attorney Mitchell Garabedian claims to have documents which prove Cardinal Bernard Law knew about sexual abuse within the diocese and did nothing.

  • GenreBiography, Drama, Historical/Period, Thriller
  • CastRachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery, Stanley Tucci.
  • DirectorTom McCarthy.
  • WriterTom McCarthy, Josh Singer.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration129 mins
  • Official sitewww.spotlightthefilm.com
  • Release29/01/2016

At its best, investigative journalism is a scalpel that slices through fatty rhetoric and cuts readers to the bones of institutions that should be defending our interests. In early 2002, the Spotlight Investigations team of the Boston Globe ran a series of meticulously researched articles, exposing the sexual abuse of minors in the Boston archdiocese.

Coverage of the scandal rippled far beyond the city boundaries and compelled other victims to come forward and share their horrific testimonies, which sent shockwaves through the Roman Catholic Church.

The newspaper was subsequently awarded the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in Journalism for its courageous and comprehensive coverage, which lifted a heavy veil of secrecy stretching back several decades.

Thomas McCarthy's impeccably crafted drama pays tribute to the close-knit team of tenacious editors and reporters, who tirelessly pursued the truth and wrung their blood, sweat and tears into the exposes.

Deputy Managing Editor Ben Bradlee Jr (John Slattery) presides over the Boston Globe newsroom and has direct responsibility for the Spotlight team led by Walter "Robby" Robinson (Michael Keaton).

Down in the basement, Robby and his colleagues Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams) and Matt Carroll (Brian d'Arcy) invest thousands of hours following leads and gathering evidence. Their work is valuable but costly and incoming Boston Globe editor Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber) makes clear he is willing to make difficult cuts.

"I'm focused on finding a way to make this paper essential to its readers," he tells Robby. The team is hard at work on a potentially explosive story. Attorney Mitchell Garabedian (Stanley Tucci) claims to have documents which prove Cardinal Bernard Law (Len Cariou) knew about sexual abuse within the diocese and did nothing.

Marty authorises Robby to quietly pursue the story before he is personally summoned to a meeting with the Cardinal.
"I find that this city flourishes when its great institutions work together," purrs the holy man.
"I'm of the opinion that for the paper to best perform its function, it needs to stand alone," boldly retorts Marty.

Battle lines are drawn and Robby pleads with his writers so keep their emotions in check as they are confronted with horrific stories of shattered innocence. "I don't want the Chancery getting wind of this before we know what we have," he implores.

Spotlight is a clinical, precise and riveting dramatisation of a protracted search for the ugly truth in a city in the thrall of the church. The ensemble cast are exemplary with Ruffalo gifted the film's stand-out scene of unfettered indignation that undoubtedly secured him his Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor.

Some of the characters don't feel fully formed, sacrificed perhaps in favour of a forensic pursuit of the facts. Josh Singer and director McCarthy's script crackles with tension and as the printing presses of the Globe begin to roll, we finally relax.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016
Monday 15th February 2016
Tuesday 16th February 2016
Wednesday 17th February 2016
Thursday 18th February 2016

This film is also showing at:

Ted 16: Dream Opening Night 3 stars

Formed in 1984 as a conference where technology, entertainment and design converged, TED has blossomed into a global non-profit movement devoted to spreading ideas that could change the world. This year's conference, hosted by curator Chris Anderson in Vancouver, Canada brings together some of the world's most prominent thinkers, artists and storytellers to share their vision. For the first time, the public is invited to witness the opening night of the event.

  • GenreDocumentary, Shorts, Special
  • Duration120 mins
  • Official site
  • Release16/02/2016 (selected cinemas)

Formed in 1984 as a conference where technology, entertainment and design converged, TED has blossomed into a global non-profit movement devoted to spreading ideas that could change the world. This year's conference, hosted by curator Chris Anderson in Vancouver, Canada brings together some of the world's most prominent thinkers, artists and storytellers to share their vision. For the first time, the public is invited to witness the opening night of the event featuring speeches from 10-yr-old Ishita Katyal, Astro Teller, head of Alphabet/Google's X group, Riccardo Sabatini, TV showrunner Shonda Rhimes, Dan Pallotta and a closing performance from iconic choreographer Bill T Jones.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 16th February 2016

This film is also showing at:

The Big Short 5 stars

In 2008, quixotic hedge fund manager Michael Burry spots the credit and housing bubble is about to burst and he bets millions against the American economy. Other financial wizards get wind of the deal including deeply cynical hedge fund manager Mark Baum and his team. Inexperienced investors Charlie Geller and Jamie Shipley use personal ties to retired banker Ben Rickert to orchestrate their own high risk bets as financial authorities ignore warning signs and Lehman Brothers prepares to fall.

  • GenreAdaptation, Biography, Comedy, Drama, Historical/Period
  • CastSteve Carell, Christian Bale, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt.
  • DirectorAdam McKay.
  • WriterAdam McKay, Charles Randolph.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration130 mins
  • Official sitewww.thebigshortmovie.com
  • Release22/01/2016

A fool and his hard-earned money are soon parted and in 2008, many of us turned out to be unwitting fools when the mortgage crisis in America catalysed the collapse of financial institutions, resulting in an ice age of global austerity that has yet to thaw. Bankers were demonised, political establishment passed bucks as if they were handling red-hot potatoes and hard-working families paid an eye-watering price.

The Wall Street meltdown don't sound like ripe fruit for a cocktail of potty-mouthed hilarity and heartbreaking drama but Adam McKay, director of the Anchorman films, begs to differ. Stepping away from the dim-witted Will Ferrell comedies that have made his name, McKay draws inspiration from Michael Lewis's non-fiction account of the housing and credit bubble to dramatise the incredible true story of the men, who made a killing by wagering against the US economy.

"While the whole world was having a big ol' party, a few outsiders and weirdos saw what no one else could," explains sharp-suited narrator, Jared Vennett (Ryan Gosling), a bond salesman at Deutsche Bank with a keen nose for profits.

He is our wise-cracking guide to this high pressure world of bulls, bears and multi-million dollar trades. However, Jared is not the first person to spot impending doom. That honour goes to quixotic hedge fund manager Michael Burry (Christian Bale).

"It's a time bomb... and I want to short it," Burry informs his incredulous boss (Tracy Letts) and bets against the housing market. Jared gets wind of the deal and follows suit, drawing in deeply cynical hedge fund manager Mark Baum (Steve Carell) and his team: Danny Moses (Rafe Spall), Porter Collins (Hamish Linklater) and Vinnie Daniel (Jeremy Strong).

Inexperienced investors Charlie Geller (John Magaro) and Jamie Shipley (Finn Wittrock) use personal ties to retired banker Ben Rickert (Brad Pitt) to orchestrate their own high risk bets as financial authorities ignore warning signs and Lehman Brothers prepares to fall.

The Big Short is a blisteringly funny and provocative portrait of irresponsibility, fraud and gaudy excess, brought vividly to life by a superb ensemble cast. Carell and Bale shine brightest in the glittering firmament, imbuing their socially awkward oddballs with vulnerability and regret.

McKay's film is acutely aware that most of us don't speak the Wall Street lingo so the writer-director cutely interrupts the wheeler dealing with glossy edutainment spots. Wolf On Wall Street star Margot Robbie sexes up subprime mortgages while sipping champagne in a bubble bath, celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain explains a collateralized debt obligation (CDO) using leftover seafood, and actress and singer Selena Gomez makes sense of synthetic CDOs over a game of blackjack.

We might not always keep up with McKay's dazzling film and its rapid-fire, whipsmart dialogue but by the end credits, we're not far behind.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016
Monday 15th February 2016
Tuesday 16th February 2016
Wednesday 17th February 2016
Thursday 18th February 2016

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The Good Dinosaur 4 stars

Prehistoric beasts thrive including a family of Apatosaurus comprising patriarch Henry, his wife Ida and three children Buck, Libby and Arlo. A tragic accident robs the siblings of their father and soon after, Arlo falls into a river and is swept far away from his loved ones. Lost in the wilderness, Arlo meets a feral cave boy called Spot, who becomes the dinosaur's protector. Beast and human child embark on a magical adventure to return Arlo to his home in the shadow of the Clawed-Tooth Mountains.

  • GenreAdventure, Animation/Cartoon, Children, Children's, Comedy
  • CastFrances McDormand, Jeffrey Wright, Raymond Ochoa, Jack Bright.
  • DirectorPeter Sohn.
  • WriterMeg LeFauve.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration101 mins
  • Official site
  • Release27/11/2015

Four instalments of monster mashing in Jurassic Park have taught us to be thankful that an asteroid supposedly impacted Earth around 66 million years ago and wiped out the various prehistoric predators. Pixar Animation Studios begs to differ. Director Peter Sohn and his animation wizards conjure an alternate version of events: the ill-fated asteroid bypassed our third rock from the sun, allowing Tyrannosaurus Rex and other hulking beasts to thrive. Consequently, the evolutionary food chain is reversed: dinosaurs learn to talk, build homes, raise dysfunctional families and expand their horizons while humans are an untamed species that roams the wilderness on all fours and communicates in crude howls and growls. It's a cute concept that provides a solid foundation for Sohn's life-affirming tale of friendship and loyalty, inverting the touching central relationship of How To Train Your Dragon with similarly teary-eyed results. At the heart of the film is a family of Apatosaurus comprising patriarch Henry (voiced by Jeffrey Wright), his wife Ida (Frances McDormand) and three children Buck (Marcus Scribner), Libby (Maleah Padilla) and Arlo (Raymond Ochoa). They own a farm and work hard to harvest crops for the bitter winter months. "You got to earn your mark by doing something big for something bigger than yourself," Henry teaches his offspring. A tragic accident robs the siblings of their father and soon after, Arlo tumbles into a raging river and is swept far away from his loved ones. Lost in the wilderness, Arlo meets a feral cave boy called Spot (Jack Bright), who becomes the dinosaur's protector. Beast and human embark on a magical adventure of self-discovery, bound for Arlo's home in the shadow of the Clawed-Tooth Mountains. En route, they fall foul of villainous Velociprators and a scavenging Pterodactyl called Thunderclap (Steve Zahn), and befriend a Tyrannosaurus herder called Butch (Sam Elliott) and his rootin' tootin' children Ramsey (Anna Paquin) and Nash (AJ Buckley). After the heartbreak, hilarity and narrative sophistication of Inside Out, The Good Dinosaur is a step backwards for Pixar. The plot is formulaic and predictable, and the finale is drizzled in emotional syrup. While the script lacks daring and invention, the visuals are truly jaw-dropping and push the boundaries of photo-realistic animation on the big screen. Gentle humour is concentrated in the opening hour, before the obligatory harsh life lessons including one pivotal scene in which Arlo and Spot communicate their loss and loneliness through actions rather than words. The pay-off is an emotional gut punch that has become the studio's trademark. The Good Dinosaur screens with the charming short Sanjay's Super Team directed by Sanjay Patel in which a young Indian boy daydreams about three Hindu gods becoming superheroes.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016

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The Revenant 4 stars

Hugh Glass guides a team of 19th-century fur trappers and hunters under the command of Captain Andrew Henry. The men come under attack from Native Americans and Glass is mauled by a grizzly bear, which is protecting its cubs. Captain Henry leaves behind two men, Fitzgerald and Bridger, to tend to Glass and his son, Hawk. Fitzgerald decides to expedite matters by killing Hawk and dragging Glass' near lifeless body into a freshly dug grave. The explorer regains consciousness and vows revenge.

  • GenreAction, Adventure, Drama, Romance, Western
  • CastLeonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hardy, Domhnall Gleeson, Will Poulter, Forrest Goodluck.
  • DirectorAlejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.
  • WriterAlejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Mark L Smith.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration156 mins
  • Official sitewww.foxmovies.com/movies/the-revenant
  • Release15/01/2016

If film awards were bestowed for dogged determination and perseverance in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, The Revenant would sweep the 2016 Oscars. Mexican auteur Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu chose to shoot his sprawling historical epic in chronological order using natural light.

These bold aesthetic choices limited filming to just a couple of hours each day and when Mother Nature decided to withhold snow from the unforgiving Canadian wilderness, the entire production moved to Argentina at considerable expense.

Actor Tom Hardy was forced to drop out of the comic book adventure Suicide Squad to accommodate the extended filming schedule, the budget ballooned and one crew member famously described the mood on set as "a living hell".

Trials and tribulations behind the scenes haven't tarnished Inarritu's audacious vision because The Revenant is a tour-de-force of technical brio and emotionally cold storytelling. It's not a journey into the heart of darkness for the sentimental or faint of heart. Explosions of violence are graphic and a horrifying bear attack early in the film unfolds in a single, unbroken take that shreds our nerves beyond repair.

Leading man Leonardo DiCaprio puts himself through the wringer for his art. In one stomach-churning scene, the fervent vegetarian eats a wild bison's liver on camera because the role demands it. Such unswerving dedication makes him a deserved frontrunner for the Academy Award.

He plays 19th-century explorer Hugh Glass, who guides a team of fur trappers and hunters under the command of Captain Andrew Henry (Domhnall Gleeson). The men come under attack from Native Americans led by tribal chief Elk Dog (Duane Howard), whose daughter Powaqa (Melaw Nakehk'o) has been kidnapped.

The interlopers flee for their lives and Glass is subsequently injured in a mauling from a grizzly bear, which is protecting its cubs. Henry leaves behind two men, Fitzgerald (Hardy) and Bridger (Will Poulter), to tend to Glass and his son, Hawk (Forrest Goodluck), while the rest of the trappers head for safety.

"Glass is to be cared for... as long as necessary," orders the Captain, "and a proper burial when it's time. He's earned that." Fitzgerald decides to expedite matters by killing Hawk and dragging Glass' near lifeless body into a freshly dug grave.

The explorer regains consciousness some time later and vows to hunt down the men who killed his boy. "I ain't afraid to die," growls Glass. "I done it already."

The Revenant is a gruelling two and a half hours in the company of a filmmaker who refused to compromise. Aided by cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki (Gravity, Birdman), Inarritu conjures a nightmarish and unflinching vision of a grieving father's revenge mission.

DiCaprio is mesmerising, dragging his wounded body across frozen landscapes before locking horns with Hardy's scowling rival in an adrenaline-pumped climax that leaves us gasping for air.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Sunday 14th February 2016
Wednesday 17th February 2016
Thursday 18th February 2016

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