Telan Carlton dies after months in damp Chapelfields council flat

Kia Stone at her council flat in Bramham Road, Chapelfields

Baby Telan pictured with one of her toys

First published in Stamp Out Poverty news by

TELAN Carlton was born at ten minutes to midnight on November 8, 2011, at York Hospital. She was, in the words of her mother, Kia Stone, a “gorgeous, perfect little angel”.

“She just had these gorgeous little eyes that looked up at you,” Kia said. “She didn’t cry. She was happy, so innocent, not a care in the world.”

Telan died at 9.43pm on October 6, 2012, at York Hospital, after suddenly being taken ill at the family’s one-bed council flat in Chapelfields.

Shortly after feeding her from a bottle and putting her down in her cot, her mother heard her coughing. She rushed through to find the little girl had stopped breathing.

Telan was two days short of being 11 months old. For her mother, who was at her side as medics at York Hospital struggled to resuscitate her, it was as though the bottom had dropped out of her world.

“I just fell down next to the bed when they told me there was nothing more they could do,” said Kia, 24. “I was just begging her to wake up.”

Nobody knows yet why Telan died. An inquest has been opened and adjourned, while histology and toxicology tests are awaited. But Kia wonders if the damp and mould in the tiny, one-bed flat in which she lived with Telan, her son Taran, four, and her partner, Simon, may have contributed to her daughter’s death.

“Personally, I think the conditions of the flat may have contributed to what happened,” she said. City of York council does not accept that. The little girl’s death was a tragedy, said Steve Waddington, the authority’s assistant director for housing and community safety.

“It is very, very sad. But there is no evidence to suggest that the damp and conditions in the property have been an influencing factor in Telan’s death.”

Whatever the cause of the little girl’s death, her short life highlights the huge extremes of wealth and poverty that still continue to blight our society – even in a city as apparently prosperous as York.

Telan’s family had lived in their one-bed flat for almost three years. Before that, Kia and her son had lived in a privately rented two-bed house in Acomb. A fulltime mum, she paid the rent out of benefits.

Then, Kia said, the landlord decided to put the house up for sale. The asking price was £113,000.

“I didn’t have that kind of money.” Her tenancy agreement offered her no protection, because she was at the end of her one-year contract.

The city council offered her accommodation at the one-bed flat in Chapelfields. Kia was told she could reapply for a larger property once her son reached the age of two.

She did so. But with almost 4,800 people on the authority’s housing waiting list – hundreds of them assessed as being a greater priority than Telan and her family – and with only 500 or so council properties becoming available every year, the wait dragged on.

At first, when there were only her son and herself in the small flat, it wasn’t too bad, Kia said.

But then her partner, Simon, moved in too – and Telan was born. There were four of them in a cramped flat. A video commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation for a series on poverty shows the bedroom: with a double bed for the adults, a single bed for Taran, and a cot for Telan, all crammed in together.

It was the damp and mould which bothered Kia most, however.

The bedroom wall was wet with condensation, and covered with mould.

Kia and Simon tried keeping the windows open, and cleaning and washing the walls with anti-fungal solution. But the mould always came back.

She complained repeatedly to the council, who sent a workman round to install humidity-controlled fans, which Kia says didn’t help.

The authority says it advised the family on how to reduce condensation.

It accepts that part of the problem was that there were four people and a dog living in a onebed flat.

But there is a massive shortage of housing in the city, Mr Waddington stressed. The council followed its housing policy to the letter.

A recent study commissioned by the council revealed the extent of the “poverty gap” in York. It showed a child born in the poorest parts of the city could expect, on average, to live 11 years less than a child born in a wealthy part of the city.

Telan Carlton’s life was a great deal shorter even than that. Kia has now been offered a larger flat.

“It is too little, too late,” she said.

 

It seemed like a normal day

OCTOBER 6 began just like any other day for Telan Carlton and her family. Mum Kia, step-dad Simon, brother Taran and little Telan herself had all gone into the centre of York for a day out, Telan in her pushchair.

They had tea at Wetherspoons, then went back home to their flat in Bramham Road, Chapelfields.

At 7.30pm, Kia fed Telan from a bottle, then put the little girl in her cot.

A short time later, Kia thought she heard coughing. She rushed through to check on her daughter. “She had stopped breathing,” she said.

Kia carried her through to the living room, where she, Simon and a neighbour tried desperately to revive the little girl while the ambulance was on its way.

Telan was rushed to York Hospital, where medics battled desperately to revive her. “I saw her laid there with all little tubes coming out everywhere,” Kia said.

Kia went outside for a moment – and when she came back in, it was all over.

“They told me there was nothing more they could do.”

Telan was buried at Fulford Cemetery on October 26. A couple of weeks later, on what would have been her first birthday - November 8 – the family held a celebration.

Telan’s brother, Taran, insisted, Kia says.

“He said we had to have a birthday cake because it was her birthday.”

 

Almost 4,800 on housing list

AS OF October this year, there were almost 4,800 people on City of York Council’s housing waiting list. With only about 500 to 550 council properties – and some others run by local housing authorities – becoming available each year, that can still mean a long wait for families who aren’t rated as being in most urgent need.

Telan’s family were rated as a silver priority – along with 1,949 others in York.

There are almost 340 families rated a gold priority – where there are two bedrooms fewer than the family needs, or there is a real health issue – and a very small number of emergency cases.

Telan’s family were rated only silver because while their flat was overcrowded, they were – within the terms of the council's housing policy – only one bedroom short of what they needed. It was expected that the two children should be able to share a bedroom.

The council admits that there is a massive housing shortage in York.

It estimates that York needs to build 778 new, affordable homes every year. With the recession having put a brake on development, that is not happening.

Recently, the council held a housing week to look at ways of encouraging more housebuilding.

It is also looking at ways of building new council homes, encouraging families to move into smaller council homes where appropriate, releasing larger homes for those who need them; and bringing more empty homes back into use.

The authority accepts that there is a real link between quality of housing and health.

A recent study commissioned by the council revealed that a child born in the poorest parts of York can expect to live 11 years less than a child born in a wealthier area of the city.

 

Foundation’s battle against poverty

THE York-based Joseph Rowntree Foundation has set up a programme of work to try to fight poverty in the UK.

It is working to challenge the myths and stereotypes surrounding people who are struggling to make ends meet and is encouraging a national debate to find out what can be done.

The foundation has commissioned analysis and research, including a series of films on the frontline of poverty made for The Guardian newspaper by filmmaker Peter Gordon.

To find out more, go to jrf.org.uk and to view the films go to guardian.co.uk/society/video

 

Comments from City of York Council

Councillor Tracey Simpson-Laing, City of York Council's Cabinet Member for Health, Housing and Adult Social Services said: “My thoughts are with Kia and her family during this incredibly sad time and I am working with officers to ensure that support is provided to the family both in dealing with their loss and in moving to their new home.

“Here in York we have huge demand for our housing services and this is set to grow, with the current economy and York’s high house prices a significant contributing factor. This is not a situation unique to York however, it is reflected nationally. Legislation coming into force in April 2013 could impact further those people living in overcrowded conditions, as households eligible for housing benefit in registered social housing will be expected to contribute more to their rent if their number of bedrooms exceeds new Department for Work and Pensions guidelines.”


Sally Burns, City of York Council’s Director of Communities and Neighbourhoods said:
"Our heartfelt sympathies go to the Stone family for their tragic loss. At this very sad time and alongside the relevant partners we are supporting the family while they prepare to move into a home that better suits their needs.

"In York, as is the case in many other areas, we are seeing the impact of the current economic climate result in increased demand for our housing services, in particular access to housing. Our local housing market is also characterised by high house prices, which means those on lower incomes find it more difficult to get onto the housing ladder. We are also seeing the impact of reduced housing benefit entitlements and changes to the local housing allowance are impacting on lower income households.

“Against these pressures, we are working with partners to provide support for those families on our waiting list and to ensure that this is fair for all. We continue to operate within the national guidelines, alongside a number of housing associations, to increase the range of options open to people in need of housing and to work to address the issue of potential overcrowding.

“We must also continue to work to ensure people on our waiting lists are informed so that they understand the options open to them and to push forward with schemes such as the successful YorHome and the North Yorkshire Home Choice; to help people gain the right accommodate for their family, as quickly as possible.”

Comments (23)

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9:45am Wed 21 Nov 12

Theendoftheworld says...

This is a terrible tragey for the family and they have my sympathy but why keep a dog in a cramped flat?
This is a terrible tragey for the family and they have my sympathy but why keep a dog in a cramped flat? Theendoftheworld
  • Score: -1

9:51am Wed 21 Nov 12

Sawday2 says...

Dear York Press - repeating the article doesn't make it any better, or worse.
What on earth are CYC thinking of allowing their properties to get in such a state? They wouldn't let a private landlord get away with it.
Dear York Press - repeating the article doesn't make it any better, or worse. What on earth are CYC thinking of allowing their properties to get in such a state? They wouldn't let a private landlord get away with it. Sawday2
  • Score: 1

10:13am Wed 21 Nov 12

inthesticks says...

So sorry for the terrible loss of this baby, I can`t think of anything worse than losing a child.
Everyone seems to do a lot of talking about what can be done about housing issues but not much seems to change. The council just come across as impotent, both with house building action and also with making it easier for people to swap. Comment yesterday (on waiting list story) from someone who wanted to swap to a smaller home but on the homeswap website they were only banded as silver! What on earth is going on here? They have too many bedrooms yet the system was not letting them give it up. That`s just a kick in the teeth for people like Kia who were living in tiny unacceptable conditions with four in a room and nowhere for a toddler to play.
I asked a Housing Manager at the council if there were incentives to give up larger homes and he didn`t know and said he would find out - 3 weeks ago, still no reply and we have a housing crisis.
According to the article above: quote " It is also looking at ways of building new council homes, encouraging families to move into smaller council homes where appropriate, releasing larger homes for those who need them; and bringing more empty homes back into use." -Yet their own housing managers do not know if there is any way they can encourage tenants to give up 2/3/4 bedroom homes!
Sort it out Steve Waddington and stop making excuses, give incentives for people to swap larger homes and make it easier to do so. You are head of housing but I wonder what you are actually doing all day!
So sorry for the terrible loss of this baby, I can`t think of anything worse than losing a child. Everyone seems to do a lot of talking about what can be done about housing issues but not much seems to change. The council just come across as impotent, both with house building action and also with making it easier for people to swap. Comment yesterday (on waiting list story) from someone who wanted to swap to a smaller home but on the homeswap website they were only banded as silver! What on earth is going on here? They have too many bedrooms yet the system was not letting them give it up. That`s just a kick in the teeth for people like Kia who were living in tiny unacceptable conditions with four in a room and nowhere for a toddler to play. I asked a Housing Manager at the council if there were incentives to give up larger homes and he didn`t know and said he would find out - 3 weeks ago, still no reply and we have a housing crisis. According to the article above: quote " It [the council] is also looking at ways of building new council homes, encouraging families to move into smaller council homes where appropriate, releasing larger homes for those who need them; and bringing more empty homes back into use." -Yet their own housing managers do not know if there is any way they can encourage tenants to give up 2/3/4 bedroom homes! Sort it out Steve Waddington and stop making excuses, give incentives for people to swap larger homes and make it easier to do so. You are head of housing but I wonder what you are actually doing all day! inthesticks
  • Score: 0

10:53am Wed 21 Nov 12

inthesticks says...

Re: above quote from Tracey Simpson-Laing;
"Legislation coming into force in April 2013 could impact further those people living in overcrowded conditions, as households eligible for housing benefit in registered social housing will be expected to contribute more to their rent if their number of bedrooms exceeds new Department for Work and Pensions guidelines.”
Have I misunderstood something there? Surely this is for people who have too many rooms for their needs and will encourage people claiming housing benefit to move to a smaller home. Did I miss your point, I don`t see how that impacts on people in overcrowded conditions. If i`m being thick and havn`t read that correctly then will someone explain why it will impact on people who are overcrowded?
However, people on housing benefit would almost surely need help with the costs relating to moving, have you considered that Tracey?
Also, as I understand the new legislation, no one dares to mention asking anyone of pension age to pay extra for unused bedrooms to encourage them to move (even those who are eligible for housing benefit, which is what the criteria is), because they are scared of the public outcry I assume, but there are hundreds of them, just in York alone, in council houses that are way too big for them.
Re: above quote from Tracey Simpson-Laing; "Legislation coming into force in April 2013 could impact further those people living in overcrowded conditions, as households eligible for housing benefit in registered social housing will be expected to contribute more to their rent if their number of bedrooms exceeds new Department for Work and Pensions guidelines.” Have I misunderstood something there? Surely this is for people who have too many rooms for their needs and will encourage people claiming housing benefit to move to a smaller home. Did I miss your point, I don`t see how that impacts on people in overcrowded conditions. If i`m being thick and havn`t read that correctly then will someone explain why it will impact on people who are overcrowded? However, people on housing benefit would almost surely need help with the costs relating to moving, have you considered that Tracey? Also, as I understand the new legislation, no one dares to mention asking anyone of pension age to pay extra for unused bedrooms to encourage them to move (even those who are eligible for housing benefit, which is what the criteria is), because they are scared of the public outcry I assume, but there are hundreds of them, just in York alone, in council houses that are way too big for them. inthesticks
  • Score: 0

11:37am Wed 21 Nov 12

Daisy75 says...

This is a terrible tragedy, and an awful loss for the family. However, presumably she knew the size of the flat before she moved boyfriend in and had the baby. If the flat was in such poor condition, why did she bring another baby into the world until she had better housing? I appreciate she was hoping the additional boyfriend and baby would boost her up the housing list, and she didn't anticipate this terrible outcome, but it was obviously an unsuitable situation for a newborn. I'd also be interested to know if her partner has a job, or are they both living off the State?
This is a terrible tragedy, and an awful loss for the family. However, presumably she knew the size of the flat before she moved boyfriend in and had the baby. If the flat was in such poor condition, why did she bring another baby into the world until she had better housing? I appreciate she was hoping the additional boyfriend and baby would boost her up the housing list, and she didn't anticipate this terrible outcome, but it was obviously an unsuitable situation for a newborn. I'd also be interested to know if her partner has a job, or are they both living off the State? Daisy75
  • Score: 1

11:50am Wed 21 Nov 12

Von_Dutch says...

Ditto to Daisy75's comments.

I do think the Press is once again being irresponsible with publishing this article: "Nobody knows yet why Telan died. An inquest has been opened and adjourned, while histology and toxicology tests are awaited"

Speculation does no one any good.
Ditto to Daisy75's comments. I do think the Press is once again being irresponsible with publishing this article: "Nobody knows yet why Telan died. An inquest has been opened and adjourned, while histology and toxicology tests are awaited" Speculation does no one any good. Von_Dutch
  • Score: -1

12:03pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Blythespirit says...

What a tragic story - I saw the video on The Guardian website yesterday and was absolutely appalled at the conditions this family were having to live in. Overcrowding aside, that flat, with the level of mould and damp it had, was not fit for anyone to live in - let alone a family with very young children. I do know the council is under enormous pressure regarding housing. Very few properties become available and those that do, because of the law, get given to people classed as homeless (and these are usually families requiring two or more bedrooms) and existing tenants who now need more space have very little chance of getting rehoused. When the council is aware of people living in drastically overcrowded conditions, they should be adapting those homes to help ease the pressure on these families. For example, wall folding double beds could be installed in living rooms, giving space during the day but providing comfortable sleeping arrangements for parents at night. Not ideal I know but, having lived in similar conditions myself when I was younger, every little thing does help when dealing with that kind of overcrowding. However, all said, nobody should be living in the kind of unsanitary, unhealthy conditions this family had to put up with.
What a tragic story - I saw the video on The Guardian website yesterday and was absolutely appalled at the conditions this family were having to live in. Overcrowding aside, that flat, with the level of mould and damp it had, was not fit for anyone to live in - let alone a family with very young children. I do know the council is under enormous pressure regarding housing. Very few properties become available and those that do, because of the law, get given to people classed as homeless (and these are usually families requiring two or more bedrooms) and existing tenants who now need more space have very little chance of getting rehoused. When the council is aware of people living in drastically overcrowded conditions, they should be adapting those homes to help ease the pressure on these families. For example, wall folding double beds could be installed in living rooms, giving space during the day but providing comfortable sleeping arrangements for parents at night. Not ideal I know but, having lived in similar conditions myself when I was younger, every little thing does help when dealing with that kind of overcrowding. However, all said, nobody should be living in the kind of unsanitary, unhealthy conditions this family had to put up with. Blythespirit
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Wed 21 Nov 12

inthesticks says...

Daisy75 wrote:
This is a terrible tragedy, and an awful loss for the family. However, presumably she knew the size of the flat before she moved boyfriend in and had the baby. If the flat was in such poor condition, why did she bring another baby into the world until she had better housing? I appreciate she was hoping the additional boyfriend and baby would boost her up the housing list, and she didn't anticipate this terrible outcome, but it was obviously an unsuitable situation for a newborn. I'd also be interested to know if her partner has a job, or are they both living off the State?
To answer your last question - watch the JRF video as suggested in the article.
And `living off the state` is not living as you will see.
I hope people will not resort to comments with `attitude` as a valuable point will be missed if they are removed.
[quote][p][bold]Daisy75[/bold] wrote: This is a terrible tragedy, and an awful loss for the family. However, presumably she knew the size of the flat before she moved boyfriend in and had the baby. If the flat was in such poor condition, why did she bring another baby into the world until she had better housing? I appreciate she was hoping the additional boyfriend and baby would boost her up the housing list, and she didn't anticipate this terrible outcome, but it was obviously an unsuitable situation for a newborn. I'd also be interested to know if her partner has a job, or are they both living off the State?[/p][/quote]To answer your last question - watch the JRF video as suggested in the article. And `living off the state` is not living as you will see. I hope people will not resort to comments with `attitude` as a valuable point will be missed if they are removed. inthesticks
  • Score: 0

12:36pm Wed 21 Nov 12

atorycouncil2014 says...

inthesticks wrote:
Re: above quote from Tracey Simpson-Laing;
"Legislation coming into force in April 2013 could impact further those people living in overcrowded conditions, as households eligible for housing benefit in registered social housing will be expected to contribute more to their rent if their number of bedrooms exceeds new Department for Work and Pensions guidelines.”
Have I misunderstood something there? Surely this is for people who have too many rooms for their needs and will encourage people claiming housing benefit to move to a smaller home. Did I miss your point, I don`t see how that impacts on people in overcrowded conditions. If i`m being thick and havn`t read that correctly then will someone explain why it will impact on people who are overcrowded?
However, people on housing benefit would almost surely need help with the costs relating to moving, have you considered that Tracey?
Also, as I understand the new legislation, no one dares to mention asking anyone of pension age to pay extra for unused bedrooms to encourage them to move (even those who are eligible for housing benefit, which is what the criteria is), because they are scared of the public outcry I assume, but there are hundreds of them, just in York alone, in council houses that are way too big for them.
Absolutely spot on the legislation is there to help this situation. What people ignore is that it is not always a lackof housing as people in "inapproriate" housing. How many single people or couples continue to live in large family homes (costing significantly more to run) when they could mover to much smaller properties.

We have 1 and 2 people living in three bedroom houses and four people living in single bed flats
[quote][p][bold]inthesticks[/bold] wrote: Re: above quote from Tracey Simpson-Laing; "Legislation coming into force in April 2013 could impact further those people living in overcrowded conditions, as households eligible for housing benefit in registered social housing will be expected to contribute more to their rent if their number of bedrooms exceeds new Department for Work and Pensions guidelines.” Have I misunderstood something there? Surely this is for people who have too many rooms for their needs and will encourage people claiming housing benefit to move to a smaller home. Did I miss your point, I don`t see how that impacts on people in overcrowded conditions. If i`m being thick and havn`t read that correctly then will someone explain why it will impact on people who are overcrowded? However, people on housing benefit would almost surely need help with the costs relating to moving, have you considered that Tracey? Also, as I understand the new legislation, no one dares to mention asking anyone of pension age to pay extra for unused bedrooms to encourage them to move (even those who are eligible for housing benefit, which is what the criteria is), because they are scared of the public outcry I assume, but there are hundreds of them, just in York alone, in council houses that are way too big for them.[/p][/quote]Absolutely spot on the legislation is there to help this situation. What people ignore is that it is not always a lackof housing as people in "inapproriate" housing. How many single people or couples continue to live in large family homes (costing significantly more to run) when they could mover to much smaller properties. We have 1 and 2 people living in three bedroom houses and four people living in single bed flats atorycouncil2014
  • Score: 0

1:07pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Digeorge says...

Sad loss for the family and I hope that they get to the bottom of whatever caused the death and may not even be related to the damp problems and there is an Inquest. It is usually sub jucide to prejudge the outcome of an Inquest and the Press should know that.

Turning to the housing problems and stock, next year will be even worse with householders being forced out into smaller properties because of the Localism Act and benefit changes to come and have been on a number of these courses. Watch this space, it will get worse.
Sad loss for the family and I hope that they get to the bottom of whatever caused the death and may not even be related to the damp problems and there is an Inquest. It is usually sub jucide to prejudge the outcome of an Inquest and the Press should know that. Turning to the housing problems and stock, next year will be even worse with householders being forced out into smaller properties because of the Localism Act and benefit changes to come and have been on a number of these courses. Watch this space, it will get worse. Digeorge
  • Score: 0

1:15pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Digeorge says...

Quote from the Press:

"Whatever the cause of the little girl’s death, her short life highlights the huge extremes of wealth and poverty that still continue to blight our society – even in a city as apparently prosperous as York".

York Press - Sterotyping again. I live in York and suffered the loss of a child. I don't for one minute think that I am poor nor do I think that many of my friends with disabled children/child deaths are poor either. As someone that has health problems actually I find it quite offensive! Sort of things that doctors do too.

I hope though they get to the bottom of what caused it and be able to get a better house.

If there is no Inquest, then my apologies.
Quote from the Press: "Whatever the cause of the little girl’s death, her short life highlights the huge extremes of wealth and poverty that still continue to blight our society – even in a city as apparently prosperous as York". York Press - Sterotyping again. I live in York and suffered the loss of a child. I don't for one minute think that I am poor nor do I think that many of my friends with disabled children/child deaths are poor either. As someone that has health problems actually I find it quite offensive! Sort of things that doctors do too. I hope though they get to the bottom of what caused it and be able to get a better house. If there is no Inquest, then my apologies. Digeorge
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Wed 21 Nov 12

anistasia says...

It's so sad this day and age things like this still happen it will only get worse as people can't afford to have their heating on cold and damp are killers and the government let the gas and electric companies charge over the odds look at the profit these companies make shame on them all.rest in peace little one.
It's so sad this day and age things like this still happen it will only get worse as people can't afford to have their heating on cold and damp are killers and the government let the gas and electric companies charge over the odds look at the profit these companies make shame on them all.rest in peace little one. anistasia
  • Score: 0

1:27pm Wed 21 Nov 12

xtc says...

This family should have had help from the midwife and care worker to get moved,this should nt have happened and is just an example of corner cutting and cost saving by the council not to repair it I hope the family sue,tragic r.i.p. little one.
This family should have had help from the midwife and care worker to get moved,this should nt have happened and is just an example of corner cutting and cost saving by the council not to repair it I hope the family sue,tragic r.i.p. little one. xtc
  • Score: 0

1:36pm Wed 21 Nov 12

anistasia says...

What a shame this day and age something can still happen like this personally I blame the government not stopping gas & electric companies making millions in clear proffit tragic cases will be more prominent as people struggle to pay their heating bills we will have more cases the government should stop all this proffitearing at bad times like these rest in peace little one.
What a shame this day and age something can still happen like this personally I blame the government not stopping gas & electric companies making millions in clear proffit tragic cases will be more prominent as people struggle to pay their heating bills we will have more cases the government should stop all this proffitearing at bad times like these rest in peace little one. anistasia
  • Score: 0

2:04pm Wed 21 Nov 12

lowbeam says...

Dear sweet Kia,I have not the words in my heart to tell you how i feel for your loss,You,Simon and Telan are forever in my thoughts,
I remember you from times past,always happy and smiling,you will smile again Kia

sleep softly Telan
Dear sweet Kia,I have not the words in my heart to tell you how i feel for your loss,You,Simon and Telan are forever in my thoughts, I remember you from times past,always happy and smiling,you will smile again Kia sleep softly Telan lowbeam
  • Score: 0

2:35pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Vicki-AmDram says...

Black mould can cause allergies that can cause respiratory problems. The council cannot be so quick to dismiss the possibility that this could be the case here. I just pray that there is some sort of explanation for this poor family. My thoughts are with you xxx
Black mould can cause allergies that can cause respiratory problems. The council cannot be so quick to dismiss the possibility that this could be the case here. I just pray that there is some sort of explanation for this poor family. My thoughts are with you xxx Vicki-AmDram
  • Score: 0

2:38pm Wed 21 Nov 12

anybody says...

What an indictment of our society in the 21st century!
We can bail out banks and pour any amount of money into them, yet small innocent children have to live and then die in this type of inadequate housing. City of York Council has a duty to its residents of council properties to renovate and restore so that people can live in a healthy, damp free and warm environment. What a useless response in this case to send out workmen with fans!

Shame on all those who oppose and obstruct the building of new affordable homes built to modern eco standards.
What an indictment of our society in the 21st century! We can bail out banks and pour any amount of money into them, yet small innocent children have to live and then die in this type of inadequate housing. City of York Council has a duty to its residents of council properties to renovate and restore so that people can live in a healthy, damp free and warm environment. What a useless response in this case to send out workmen with fans! Shame on all those who oppose and obstruct the building of new affordable homes built to modern eco standards. anybody
  • Score: 0

3:09pm Wed 21 Nov 12

lowbeam says...

Vicki-AmDram wrote:
Black mould can cause allergies that can cause respiratory problems. The council cannot be so quick to dismiss the possibility that this could be the case here. I just pray that there is some sort of explanation for this poor family. My thoughts are with you xxx
Sadly vicki,this is not something new,34 years ago my youngest daughter caught pneumonia,ten days in an oxygen tent,we thought we had lost her..she survived..guess what caused it? Black mould in our council house,it was all shoved under the table.
The council never has and will never care for the people of York
[quote][p][bold]Vicki-AmDram[/bold] wrote: Black mould can cause allergies that can cause respiratory problems. The council cannot be so quick to dismiss the possibility that this could be the case here. I just pray that there is some sort of explanation for this poor family. My thoughts are with you xxx[/p][/quote]Sadly vicki,this is not something new,34 years ago my youngest daughter caught pneumonia,ten days in an oxygen tent,we thought we had lost her..she survived..guess what caused it? Black mould in our council house,it was all shoved under the table. The council never has and will never care for the people of York lowbeam
  • Score: 0

3:15pm Wed 21 Nov 12

lowbeam says...

Oh and as a rider,before anyone starts complaining.. I worked for York city council(as was then known) I worked for Resources in the mornings and commercial services in the afternoons/evenings
Oh and as a rider,before anyone starts complaining.. I worked for York city council(as was then known) I worked for Resources in the mornings and commercial services in the afternoons/evenings lowbeam
  • Score: 0

3:23pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Digeorge says...

That means also going to get the blood results i.e. cultures from the hospital notes and records that is if they haven't removed them.
That means also going to get the blood results i.e. cultures from the hospital notes and records that is if they haven't removed them. Digeorge
  • Score: 0

3:32pm Wed 21 Nov 12

jmumof3 says...

Its true, council properties in York have terrible damp. I have kids and am constantly having to paint the walls with neat bleach, or property gets damaged. Its all over the ceilings, walls, and will even spread onto window frames and windowsills. I've had fungal infections from it. The council have checked and say its condensation (!) but the truth is they have no money to solve this problem. I honestly think its so bad the only answer is to start knocking places down, but then everything would go into meltdown.
Its true, council properties in York have terrible damp. I have kids and am constantly having to paint the walls with neat bleach, or property gets damaged. Its all over the ceilings, walls, and will even spread onto window frames and windowsills. I've had fungal infections from it. The council have checked and say its condensation (!) but the truth is they have no money to solve this problem. I honestly think its so bad the only answer is to start knocking places down, but then everything would go into meltdown. jmumof3
  • Score: 0

4:15pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Mr Happy says...

It is tragic that in 2012, a young baby has to spend its entire life in a damp, mouldy home. Every child is born helpless. But every single child is precious and needs the help of all in society, whatever the wealth and status of their parents.

Whatever the reasons behind baby Telan's tragic death, she was failed by the society we live in.
It is tragic that in 2012, a young baby has to spend its entire life in a damp, mouldy home. Every child is born helpless. But every single child is precious and needs the help of all in society, whatever the wealth and status of their parents. Whatever the reasons behind baby Telan's tragic death, she was failed by the society we live in. Mr Happy
  • Score: 0

5:39pm Wed 21 Nov 12

roxywright says...

Feels for kia and her family,Kia is an inspiration to other women she is a good mum and a very strong woman kia is an amazing person and a good friend, the council should of given kia a 2 bedroom house when kia left her old 2 bedroom house in acomb they knew kia had a son so why put her in a one bedroom flat? But instead they insisted on dumping her in a one bed flat which was absolutely stupid of them.My thoughts are with kia and her family xxxxxxxxxxxx
Feels for kia and her family,Kia is an inspiration to other women she is a good mum and a very strong woman kia is an amazing person and a good friend, the council should of given kia a 2 bedroom house when kia left her old 2 bedroom house in acomb they knew kia had a son so why put her in a one bedroom flat? But instead they insisted on dumping her in a one bed flat which was absolutely stupid of them.My thoughts are with kia and her family xxxxxxxxxxxx roxywright
  • Score: 0

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